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October 05, 1973 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8-Story Hotel
in Jerusalem
Protested

JERUSALEM (JTA) — A
group of conservationists and
other citizens said they would
make an all-out effort to pre-
vent the construction of an
eight-story hotel in the Oma-
riyah Park in the center of
Jerusalem.
The group, calling itself the
Council for a Beautiful Is-
rael, claimed that a meeting
of the district planning com-
mittee which approved the
hotel was illegal because the
public was not represented
as required by law.
The proposed 350 - r o o m
hotel is to be built by El Al,
Israel's airline. Parents of
children attending a school
on the park grounds have
protested the planning com-
mittee's recommendation to
raze the school to make
room for the hotel. The con-
servationists are planning an
appeal to the National Plan-
ning and Building Council.
They say the hotel would ruin
the park and spoil the view
of the Old City skyline.

Lack of Cash Forces
Day School to Close

NEW YORK (JTA) — The
Solomon Schechter day high
school in Flushing was un-
able to open this month be-
cause of financial problems,
the first school in the Conser-
vative-sponsored day school
movement to discontinue op-
erations, according to Dr.
Morton Siegel, director of
the education department-of
the United Synagogue of
America.
The $2,000,000 Flushing
school building, which was
opened last year, is expected
to be sold. Sixty-six students
were enrolled.
Dr. Siegel emphasized that
the primary day school, of
which the defunct school
was a part, is operating suc-
cessfully.

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They See Up There!

Strange things have been
taking place!
High up in the astro-labs,
they have been making stud-
ies of the urban spread in
California and finding out
what crops are best suitable
for different localities in the
state. We understand, by re-
quest, they have made sim-
ilar studies of portions of Is-
rael's soil.
It would seem these stud-
ies could be better made in
the localities involved, but
apparently, way up in outer
space, thousands and thou-
sands of miles away, they
can see better what is taking
place here than we can on
earth.
There is an old Jewish
story. A hackman is driv-
ing the rabbi to a nearby
Polish village. On the way,
they pass a Polish noble-
man's estate and the hack-
man sees a bale of hay which
he could use. So he stops and
runs to the hay and is about
to move it when the rabbi
calls out, "They see! They
see!" Quickly the hackman
drops the hay and returns to
his wagon. He drives on but
looking back, he sees no one.

"Why," he asks the rabbi,
"did you say they see.? There
is no one there."
"Up there, they see," the
rabbi said, pointing to the
sky.
Seems like the rabbi was
right. They see up there what
we don't see so easily below.
Seeing has many peculiar-
ities. The Baal Shem Tov
pointed out that while we
can't see ourselves very well,
if we look at our neighbors,
they may serve as mirrors in
which we can see ourselves.
In their good and bad qual-
ities, we can study our good
and bad and the lesson that
he drew was that we should
use this "mirror" to develop
our good traits.
Apparently the move in
outer space is paying off.
"Meshaneh makom meshaneh
mazal" (change your place
and you change your luck)
says the Hebrew proverb.
There is generally some ben-
efit when we take any kind
of a trip.
When Columbus moved
across the seas, not only was
America discovered, but the
menus of the world were
changed. After Columbus, one

Israeli Stars
in NY Opera

14—Friday, October 5, 1973

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

BOOK COUZENS TRAVEL

could have a cup of cocoa
with his breakfast and have
some fried potatoes with his
eggs. Both cocoa and pota-
toes were unknown to the
Western world before, to say
nothing of tobacco.
When the Israelites took
that little trip out of Mitzra-
yim into the Sinai desert,
probably many of them said,
"Why didn't Moses take us
to Atlantic City instead?
There is nothing to see
here." What can you see in
a desert? A desert is like
outer space. Just because
there are no things to dis-
Double Occ.
tract your vision, you can
Child under 12 years old
see deepest and furthest, and
sharing room with adult
it was in the desert that the
Israelites learned that "they
see Up There.' They saw the
Highest Above and they saw
the deepest in themselves.
Tel Aviv — Hilton
It was in the desert they got
Jerusalem — King David
the Ten Commandments.
Kibbutz — Ayelet
There is a fantastic world
up there! You don't need any
Haifa — Dan Carmel
automobiles, you just swim
along. It is all due to the
fact that the Law of Gravi-
tation doesn't work there.
AN OVERNIGHT IN LONDON ON US
Maybe Congress should re-
Daily Complete Israeli Breakfast
peal the Law of Gravitation
so we wouldn't need any sub-
7 Days Sightseeing including Massada
ways, or buses. There are
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
no ups and downs, so you
Call Shirley Mopper
don't need elevators either.
The prophets of religion
were the first to realize "they
aments previously deployed see up there." They knew
along their border with Jor- that we inhabit a world of
wonders. The prophets were
dan to the Israeli front.
The move was seen by Is- the first scientists.
raeli authorities as a good-
will gesture toward Jordan in
view of the recently improved
relations between the two
countries. Syria has also bol-
stered its antiaircraft defens-
COMPLETE HOME MODERNIZATION
es between the Israeli border
and Damascus.
• RECREATION ROOMS
• GARAGES
The Suez Front remained
• ROOFING
• ATTICS
• PORCHES
quiet despite the Egyptian de-

SIDING

ADDITIONS
cision to order a full alert
there. Cairo alleged that Is-
FREE ESTIMATES
rael was massing troops on
the East Bank of the canal.
23120 MAJESTIC (25 Years of Quality Construction) OAK PARK
Israeli authorities said there
LI 4-3872 JO 4-5665 MON.-FRI. 9-7 SAT. & SUN. 10-4
have been no unusual Israel
troop movements in the area.

Syrian Forces Reported Shifting;
Golan Settlements Are Alerted

TEL AVIV (JTA)—The Is-
raeli military has taken pre-
cautionary measures along
the northern frontier in view
of a large-scale shift of Syr-
ian troops to that region in
recent days.
An alert was ordered at Is-
raeli settlements on the Gol-
an Heights although military
authorities do not believe the
Syrians are planning any mil-
itary intiatives an the border
in the foreseeable future, it
was stated here.
The Syrians were said to
have shifted troops and arm-

By DAVID SCHWARTZ

(Copyright 1973, JTA, Inc.)

presents a deluxe

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Dec. 23 - Jan. 3

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•••

Michael Li-Paz, basso, will
make his debut with the New
York City Opera Company
at Lincoln Center as "Dr.
Bartolo" in "The Barber of
Seville," Nov. 3. Li-Paz, the
first native Israeli to be en-
gaged by the New York City
Opera, will also appear in
the Nov. 8 and 11 produc-
tions. He has been asked to
prepare and has mastered a
new role for the 1973/4
season of the company,
"Baron Ochs" in Richard
Strauss' "Der Rosenkava-
lier."
Last season the young
basso made his debut as
"Dr. Bartolo" with the
Philadelphia Grand Opera at
the Academy of Music in
Philadelphia. He is sched-
uled to perform again this
season with the same com-
p-any as the king in Verdi's
"Aida."
In December, Li-Paz will
sing the role of "Ketzal" in
the new production of
Smetana's "The Bartered
Bride" at Lincoln Center in
New York.
Li-Paz, who will be fea-
tured this season in recitals
in New York, Cincinnati and
in Philadelphia, his current
home, is the recipient of a
grant from the America-
Israel Cultural Foundation.

It is the difference of opin-
ion that makes horse races.
—Mark Twain.

41 ) 9

4111EINSIP

With Heartfelt Gratitude ..

We express our appreciation to the hundreds of supporters of
Bar-Ilan University for their cooperation in making Detroit a leading
community of action in behalf of higher traditional education in Israel.

Our thanks go forth to our many friends, to Dr. Leon Fill and his
committee, for the successful 18th anniversary Dinner, on Sept. 20.

We take this opportunity to recall the pioneering efforts of those
families in whose homes our initial organizational meetings were held 18
years ago:

Daniel Temchin Family
Abraham Nusbaum Family
Irving W. Schlussel Family
Isaac and Minna Rosenthal Family

The families of these pioneers are always with us, and at this time
of sacred remembrance we are especially appreciative of their dedication
to our great tasks for Jewish learning.

Our blessings go forth to the pioniers and to all friends and associ-
ates for a Very Happy Year.

PHILLIP STOLLMAN

National Chairman, American Friends of
Bar-Han University

ZVI TOMKIEWICZ

Executive Director, Detroit Friends of
Bar-Han University

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