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August 03, 1973 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U.S. Explains Veto of UN Resolution, Viewed as 'Setback 'to Peaceful Aims

(Continued from Page 1)
"When the Security Council
vote is seen in the context
of other recent events on the
international stage (the Nix-
on-Brezhnev summit, the
European security confer-
ence, the International Labor
Organization meeting in Ge-
neva) a clear picture emer-
ges: that there is no possi-
bility of breaking through the
deadlock by public invective
in international forums.
"On the other hand, the
gates to negotiations between
Israel and Egypt are wide
open and it is to be hoped
that Egypt, which initiated
this sterile debate, will now
study the need for negotia-
tions." Israeli diplomats in
several of the council mem-
ber states, including Britain
and France now will be in-
structed to register Israel's
displeasure at these states'
support for the anti-Israeli
resolution, Jerusalem sources
said.
- The ambassadors of Aus-
tralia, Britain, Austria and
perhaps some other Security
Council members were ex-
pected to be summoned to
the foreign ministry here to
be told of Israel's displeasure
at their support of the anti-
Israel draft.
Officials said the foreign
ministry was launching a
two-pronged campaign - to ex-
press its displeasure to the
council members with which
Israel has relations: in Jeru-
salem their envoys would be
called in, and in the various
capitals Israel's envoys
would make the govern-
ment's views known to their
host governments.
The political director of
the Austrian Foreign Minis-
try, Dr. Ludwig Steiner, is
visiting Israel.
(In New York, the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organiza-
tions and the Anti-Defama-
tion League of Bnai Brith
sent messages to John Scali,
U.S. ambassador to the UN,
praising his action in vetoing

Bulgaria Honors
Jewish Leaders

SOFIA (JTA)—The Jew-
ish Cultural Center of Sofia
recently honored the memory
of freedom fighters Leon Tag-
ger and Violetta Yacova.
Tagger, who would have
been 70 years in July and
Mrs. Yacova, 50, were honor-
ed for their "heroism in the
fight against Nazism."
The Bulgarian government
has awarded the "Order of
the Red Flag" to Dr. Sam-
uel Josef Avramov, a spe-
cialist in sports medicine.
The "Order of Popular La-
bor" was awarded to Albert
Josef Belo on his 50th birth-
day and to journalist Daniel
Shimon Nissim.
Also in Bulgaria, a Jewish
cultural center named after
the painter Jules Pasquin
(Julius Markus Pinkas)open-
ed recently in the town of
Vidin.
Pasquin, who was born in
Vidin, spent most of his life
in France. His works are ex-
hibited in galleries through-
out the world.

the resolution and noting
that his action marked
a continued search for peace
in the Middle East.)
* *
WASHINGTON (JTA) —
State Department spokesman
Charles Bray said the draft
resolution defeated in the
Security Council would have
"set back," not advanced
the chances for peaceful
settlement in the Middle
East.
U.S. delegate John Scali
vetoed the eight-nation Sec-
urity Council draft resolution
that deplored Israel's occu-
pation of territories taken
in 1967 late last Thursday
afternoon.
While the United States
was willing to offer amend-
ments which would have
"restored a degree of bal-
ance to the resolution," Bray
said, "the absence of a
serious response makes it
difficult not to conclude that
the principle purpose was to
draw an American veto."
Bray emphasized that the
U.S. continues to support a
negotiated settlement invol-
ving Israel and Egypt but
declined to state whether the
negotiated process . m u s t
necessarily be direct.
The U.S. veto came, he
said, because the resolution
would have "distorted and
changed the Security Council
Resolution 242 which is the
only agreed basis for a
settlement."
He explained that the de-
feated resolution referred to
withdrawal from "the" oc-
cupied territories rather than
the more general "with-
drawal from territories oc-
cupied . . ." in the Resolu-
tion 242. Introduction of the
word "the" would have
called on Israel to make a
total withdrawal from all
occupied territories before
negotiations would begin.
Thirteen of the 15 council
members voted in favor of
the resolution. The People's
Republic of China did not
participate in the vote.
The resolution drafted by
Guinea, India Indonesia,
Kenya, Panama, Peru, Su-
dan and Yugoslavia also ex-
pressed "serious concern at
Israel's lack of cooperation"
with Dr. Gunnar V. Jarring,
the special representative of
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim.
Huang Hua, the Chinese
ambassador, explained that
he did not participate in the
vote because a resolution
must "strongly condemn"
what he termed the Israeli-
Zionist clique for prolonged
aggression, must ask for im-
mediate and total with-
drawal, and call for the
restitution of the rights of
the Palestitnians. The draft
had cited "respect" for the
"rights and legitimate aspir-
ations" of the Palestinians.
After the vote, Scali said
the draft resolution was "un-
balanced" and "unrealistic"
and the U.S. had vetoed it
because the draft would have
undermined Resolution 242.
Scali said he was "deeply
disappointed by the outcome
of this debate" and noted the

JOHN SCALI

resolution, instead of focus-
ing on agreement, was more
concerned with judging the
past.
He reiterated that Resolu-
tion 242 is the only measure
agreed on by all the parties
in the Mid-east dispute and
remains the framework for
solving the conflict. "Casting
a veto is never easy," Scali
explained, but pointed out
that it was necessary in view
of the "unbalanced and par-
tisan resolution:"
Israeli Ambassador Yosef
Tekoah, exercising his right
to reply, told the council that
the veto "averted grave de-
velopments and it preserves
Resolution 242 as the basis
on which agreement can be
sought." He criticized Egypt
for its policies which he said
have not changed "since the
days of war when its goal
was to annihilate the Israeli
people."
The 13 nations who voted
for the draft resolution,
Tekoah declared, were "di-
vorced from the truth and
realities of the Middle East
conflict."
Soviet Ambassador Yakov
Malik, in his right of reply,
stated that the vote for the
resolution was proof of Is-
rael's international isolation
and that Israel's attacks on
the Soviet Union were in-

tended to turn American
Jews against the USSR.
Golda: No Comparison
Between Jews, Palestinians
JERUSALEM (JTA) —
Premier Golda Meir rejected
comparisons between the
situation of the Jewish people
and those of the Palestinian
Arabs.
Addressing the Knesset on
its last day before adjourn-
ing for the summer recess
and the October elections,
Mrs. Meir said such a com-
parison was a "complete
distortion."
While Jews around the
world lived outside of their
homeland, the Palestinian
Arabs can express their na-
tionality in Jordan, she said.
"Israel is the only country
in the world where the people
of Israel can live in Jewish
independence," Mrs. Meir
said.
She reiterated that between
the Mediterranean and the
eastern desert there was
room for two countries only,
a Jewish state and an Arab
state, Israel and Jordan. She
said "we oppose the creaticn
of an additional Arab state."
While the Palestinian refu-
gee problem was caused be-
cause the Arab states pre-
vented any solution in the
Middle East, Mrs. Meir said,
Israel had started after the
Six-Day War to rehabilitate
Arab refugees under its con-
trol. "We did and we shall
do our utmost, and we shall
try to obtain resources from
international sources to
achieve this goal," she said.
Mrs. Meir rejected the
possibility of Israel negoti-
ating with the Arab terrorist
organizations, saying, "It is
not acceptable that we shall
negotiate with murderous or-
ganizations which aspire to
destroy Israel and create in
its place a Palestinian
state."
She expressed surprise at

repeated mention in the UN
and other places of the
"legitimate interests" of the
Palestinian people. "These
statements do not contribute

6—Friday, August 3, 1973.

to the advancement of
peace," she said. They only
encourage the terror organ-
izations ideologically and
cause false hopes, she added.

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