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July 20, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Pincus Elected to Head COJO; Plight of Jews in Moslem Lands
and Absorption Developments Reported at Geneva Sessions

(Continued from Page 1)
American Association for
Jewish Education, educa-
tional bodies in various coun-
tries, the universities of Is-
rael and the Israel ministry
of education." He said, how-
ever, that the commission
does not think in terms of a
world master plan for Jew-
ish education but in each
country tackles educational
problems separately in part-
nership with the local Jewish
community.
Additional officers elected
to the COJO presidium at
the closing plenary session
Monday were: David Mann,
chairman of the South Afri-
can Jewish Board of Depu-
ties, Prof. Ady Steg of the
CRIF in France, and one
additional member, unnamed
yet to the executive council
of Australian Jewry.
The conference heard an
optimistic report of a "sur-
prising resurgence of inter-
est, identity and commitment
among American Jews, in-
cluding young Jews of col-
lege age." Prof. Leonard
Fein of Brandeis University
cited the growth of depart-
ments and chairs of Judaic
studies, the "flourishing" of
Jewish journalism at univer-
sity level, the study of He-
brew and Yiddish by un-
precedented numbers of Jew-

ish people as evidence that
"the university campus in
the U.S. can no longer be
described as a 'disaster' area
for Jewish life."
Prof. Ady Steg, president
of the Representative Coun-
cil of French Jews (CRIF),
said the situation of Jewish
education in his country
"was not as dramatic as
some described it." Speaking
in Yiddish, Prof. Steg said
that more and more young
Jews examine world and
sociological problems in the
light of their "Jewishness"
which is playing an increas-
ingly important role in every-
day life.
Hebrew University Presi-
dent Avraham Harman said
that "Israel can play a role
as a model and resource in
the creation of indigenous
Jewish leadership and cul-
tural life outside Israel." He
"totally rejected" the view
that Jewish survival depend-
ed on Jewish catastrophe as
a binding force.
Prof. Nadav Safran of
Harvard University's De-
partment of Government,
criticized Israel for not do-
ing enough to encourage
Egypt's "liberal forces that
are willing to come to terms
with the Jewish state." He
called for the creation of an
Israeli "strategy of peace"

to make a concerted effort
to help Egypt's liberal ele-
ments prevail against con-
servative and radical ten-
dencies in that country.
Pincus. chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Execu-
tives, was unanimously elect-
ed chairman of COJO at the
close of the plenary meet-
ing. Dr. Joachim Prinz of
the World Jewish Congress,
and David Blumberg, inter-
national president of Bnai
Brith, were elected co-chair-
man of COJO. The vice
chairmen are: Sir Samuel
Fisher, president of the
Board of Deputies of British
Jews; Sol Kanee, president
of the Canadian Jewish Con-
gress; and Sion Cohen .mach
of the DAIA in Argentina.
Yehuda Hellman was re-
elected secretary general of
COJO.
In addition to these of-
ficers, Mrs. Charlotte Jacob-
son, chairman of the WZO-
American Section, Dr. Wil-
liam A. Wexler of Bnai Brith
and Tibor Rosenbaum of the
World Jewish Congress were
elected members of the pre-
sidium of COJO.
Pincus spoke on the prob-
lem of' absorbing Soviet
Jewish emigres in Israel and
the problem of those immi-
grants who decided not to re-

Sensational Business Deal: Israel Buys
100,000 Tons of Cement From USSR

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Is-
rael is buying 100,000 tons of
cement from the Soviet
Union in the first commercial
transaction between the two
countries since Moscow sev-
ered diplomatic relations
with Israel during the 1967
Six-Day War, it was reported
here Wednesday.
The first consignment —
20,000 tons — is expected
from Russia next month. It
will be the largest single
shipment of cement ever to
reach Israel and will be car-
ried in an American vessel
which will load the cement
at a Soviet port after dis-
charging a cargo of U.S.
wheat, the report said.
The report, carried by the
newspapers Maariv and Ye-

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diot Ahronot, said the price While Israel suffers short-
of the Russian cement is ages of cement and must im-
slightly higher than the cur- port large quantities, it re-
rent price on the internation- mained a mystery why Israel
al market. It was quoted at would go to the Soviet mar-
$28 a ton at a Russian port ket for the product.
The government indicated
and $35 per ton in Israel. But
it is not known what price recently that it intended to
Israel is paying under the encourage the establishment
deal. Payment will be ef- of new cement plants to sup-
fected through a third party, plement the Nesher monoply
the newspapers said.
which has been unable to
It has not been disclosed produce sufficient cement for
when the deal was made and domestic building need s.
whether it was negotiated di- Nesher is required to im-
rectly by Israel and the USSR port cement when it falls
or through a third party. short of its quotas.

Polish Jews See Dim Future,
Reports Bnai Brith Delegation

GENEVA (JTA) — A Bnai
B'rith delegation, headed by
David Blumberg, interna-
tional president, and Herman
Edelsberg, director of the
Bnai Brith International
Council, arrived here from
Warsaw and reported that
the Polish Jewish community
was discouraged about its
future but that the Polish
government wanted to im-
prove relations with world
Jewry.
"The leaders of the genu-
ine Jewish community, with
whom we met at length, were
discouraged about the future
of their aging and declining
community," Blumberg told
the JTA.
"It is discouraging, too, to
report that the leadership of
the government - supported
Jewish cultural and social
association has no interest in

But Blumberg stressed
that "We opened the door
for the first time since the
purges of 1968" and noted
that "we are encouraged
that many important leaders
of the Polish government
want to improve relations
with the Jews of the world."
The Bnai Brith president
said that the delegation em-
phasized to the Polish lead-
ers that "We're ready to help
remove the barriers that
separate us and to devote our
efforts to the building of

bridges of understanding."

While in Poland, the dele-
gation met with several high
officials, the American am-
bassador, Richard Davies,
the head of the Jewish reli-
gious community in Warsaw,
Isaac Frenkel, and with the
head of the Jewish religious
community in Cracow, A. A.
Jewish survival or in the JLkubovitz, and with the
other problems that vitally heads of the Jewish Cultural ,
concern world Jewry."
and Social Association.

REALTY

Herman. J. Gorman, Broker

main in Israel and whose
number, he said, was "minis-
cule" compared to the over-
all emigration. He noted that
a total of 95 Soviet Jews re-
turned to Vienna and 80 are
still there, reportedly seek-
ing re-admission to the So-
viet Union. He said there
were also about 400 re-
turnees in Rome waiting to
go elsewhere. "But these
figures should be viewed
against 60,000 Soviet olim
since Mt. No aliya ever
had such a miniscule per-
centage of yerida (re-
turnees)" he said.
Ambassador Shmuel Divon
of Israel, speaking about the
plight of Jews in Arab coun-
tries, said conditions were
"particularly deplorable" in
Syria where there are some
5,000 Jews "denied all civil
rights," He said "the re-
strictions placed on them
are crippling. They are also
subjected to cruel persecu-
tions, even dreadful torture
on occasions. The right of
immigration is totally denied
them."
In Iraq, where there are
some 400 Jews left, the situ-
ation has worsened of late,
Divon said, culminating in
the massacre of the Kash-
kosh family in their Baghdad
home. "If further outrages
are not prevented in time,
the tiny Jewish community
of Iraq will face total ex
Unction," he said.
Stanley Abramovitch, chair-
man of the COJO commis-
sion in Iran, reported that
there are presently 10,000
Jewish children receiving a
Jewish education in that
country. He said that two-
thirds of them are in pri-
mary schools and one-third
in secondary schools. There
are 100 Jewish teachers. "All
schools in Iran are govern-
ment-controlled, but the Jew-
ish schools have facilities
for 8-10 hours a week de-
voted to Jewish education,"
Abramovitch reported, add-
ing, "With all this there is
still much to do in Iran."
Mordechai
Kornhandler,
chairman of the Jewish edu-
cation committee in Argen-
tina reported that 25,000 Jew-
ish children there receive a
Jewish education but they
comprise only one-fourth of
the school-age Jewish chil-
dren in Argentina. "Jewish
education in Argentina is
nationally Jewish, Zionist
and Israel-oriented," he
said. "There are 2,000 Jew-
ish teachers in Argentina,
80 per cent of them born
and educated in the coun-
try" though 60 per cent have
had a period of study in Is-
rael.
Kornhandler said that in
Buenos Aires there are 4,500
Jewish children in kinder-
garten, 9,000 in primary
schools and 2,500 in high

schools and special schools.
The Jewish school system in
Argentina are all supported
by the Jewish community
with the help of the Jewish
Agency and the American
Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee, he said. Twenty
hours a week are devoted to
Jewish subjects in Jewish
high schools in Argentina.



8—Friday, July 20, 1973

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Native-Born Rabbi Expelled by Czechs

LONDON (JTA) — Dr. He returned to Czechoslo-
Ephraim P. Einhorn, a Czech- vakia in 1972 to join mem-
born rabbi who is an Ameri- bers of his family.
can citizen, was expelled
f r o m Czechoslovakia. A
Prague radio broadcast said
SPECIAL SUMMER
Dr. Einhorn was given 48
hours to leave the coun-
ADVANCED CLASSES
try for activities "incompati-
ble with the interests of the
$10 JULY & AUGUST
state." No elaboration of the
charge was given.
Mondays at 10 a.m.
Dr. Einhorn lived in Brit-
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ain during World War II and
was employed by the Brit-
LI 6-8040
ish Section of the World Jew-
ish Congress. He went to Is-
23029 COOLIDGE
rael after the war and later
OAK PARK
moved to the United States.

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