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June 08, 1973 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Louis Hamburger Marks 70th Birthday
Planting *INF Family Forest in Israel

Louis Hamburger honors
himself and his wife, Ethel,
on his 70th birthday with
the planting of a Hamburger
Jewish National Fund Forest
in Israel.
His announcement of a
gift to JNF for 10,000 trees
was accompanied by his re-
affirmation of many years of
service in behalf of Israel.
With his brother, Samuel
Hamburger, the septuagena-
rian has served for 11 years
as co-treasurer of the Allied
Jewish Campaign. He has
visited Israel several times
with his wife, has participat-
ed in UJA missions and his
interest in Israel led him
in 1971 to give to the Jew-
ish state a 42-foot diesel-
powered Commander, a
Chris-Craft boat which can
sleep a crew of six. It is
named Shifra and is being
used on the Sea of Galilee
for scientific marine re-
search.
Hamburger's many philan-
thropies include the Ham-
burger-Jospey Building at
Sinai Hospital, dedicated in
1964 for medical research
programs. It was given in be-
half of the Hamburger and
Jo s p e y families. Bearing ,
their names also is another
gift—the Hamburger Lobby
in the Jewish Center on Mey-
ers. financed by the Samuel
and Miriam Hamburger
Foundation and the Louis
and Ethel Hamburger Foun-
dation.
In memory of the Ham-
burgers' parents, these two
foundations also donated the
medical wings in the Bor-
man Hall of the Jewish Horne I
for the Aged. This wing in-
cludes the Home for Aged
pharmacy and medical and
dental facilities.
Louis and Ethel Hamburg-
er, benefactors of the Found-
ers Society of the Detroit In-
stitute of Art since 1962,
have donated notable art
works to the institute. The
Hamburger Foundations are
listed on the title plate of
the gallery in the Art Insti-
tute South Wing.
The Hamburgers also gave
support to Herman Kiefer

New Air Terminal
Is Open in Sinai

SHARM EL SHEIKH — A
$500,000 air terminal was in-
augurated recently at the
Ophira Airport.
The new air station is the
first contribution toward the
development of Ophira as a
civic center, said Reuven
Aloni, head of the civil ad-
ministration in the Solomon
area (south Sinai).
Aloni forsees that in five
years 1,000 families will be
living permanently in this
area and 2,000-bed hotels will
have been built. He has re-
quested the support of Shi-
mon Peres, minister of trans-
portation, so that Ophira may
became an international air-
port equipped for charter
flight planes.
Peres said last year there
was a flow of 72,000 passen-
gers at Ophira Airport, and
that in 1975 120,000 could be
expected. A second terminal
will be inaugurated shortly
at the St. Catherine Airport.
The minister mentioned the
opening of a bus station for
the development of the land
route, and expressed his hope
that a costal road would also
be opened. He said telephone
and wireless communication

are sought in the area.

Hospital and the University
of Detroit.
Born in Detroit, June 10,
1903. son of Harry B. and
Sarah Hamburger, immi-
grants from Latvia, Louis
Hamburger, together with
his brother Samuel, and two
brothers now deceased—Max
and Isadore — joined his
father in the family firm,
H. B. Hamburger Co., a con-
struction firm, in, 1925.
Later, Production Steel
was founded by Louis and
Samuel. Their nephew, Max-
well Jospey, who also is a

LOUIS HAMBURGER

12—Friday, June 8, 1973

past general chairman of the
Allied Jewish Campaign, be-
came associated with them in
their business as well as',
their philanthropic ventures.
Jospey, a vice-president of
the Jewish Welfare Federa-
tion, is now president of
Whittaker Steel Strip, for-
merly Production Steel.
Production was recently
sold to Whittaker and Louis
Hamburger and his son Rich-
ard remain consultants to
the new owners.
Louis Hamburger is a
graduate of Northern High
School where he was captain
of the football team. He was
named to the all-city and
all-state teams during his
high school career. At Wayne
University, he was a mem-
ber of the collegiate foot-
ball team.
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ham-
burger have a daughter,
Mrs. Lawrence L. (Gloria)
Stocker, two sons, Harry and
Richard, and 10 grandchil-
dren. They are members of
Shaarey Zedek and are af-
filiated with numerous ma-
jor Jewish movements.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Australian Honored

for Role in Statehood

JERUSALEM — "If there
is one man who is respon-
sible almost single-handedly
for getting the two votes of
Australia and New Zealand
in November 1947 for the
establishment of the Jewish
state, Max Freilich is the
man who did it," Hebrew
University comptroller Sim-
ha Pratt, former Israeli am-
bassador to Australia, said
at a university dinner honor-
ing Freilich, and his wife
Sasha. It was the occasion
of the Sydney manufacturer's
80th birthday and in recog-
nition of their longtime sup-
port of Israel and the He-
brew University.

fish, who abstained on that
resolution. It was Max Frei-
lich who contacted Peter
Fraser, then prime minister
of New Zealand, and got him
to instruct his representative
in New York to vote in favor
of the Jewish state.
"By these actions, Max
Freilich has secured a place
in the history of the Jewish
people," Pratt concluded.

Due to Freilich's friend-
ship with Dr. Herbert Evatt,
the Australian minister of
external affairs and later
chairman of the ad hoc Com-
mittee on Palestine, Freilich
succeeded in enlisting his
support for the idea of the
Jewish state in Palestine.
"And then almost single-
handedly he got the vote of
New Zealand. In those days
New Zealand followed very
closely the policy of the Bri-

Nature Lovers?

JERUSALEM — Hundreds
of young saplings carefully
planted by the Jerusalem
Municipality were damaged
or destroyed by the crowds
who came to watch the In-
dependence Day march-past.
Youngsters climbed to the
top of the steel frames enclos-
ing the saplings, broke off
the tops of the young trees
and sat on these perches to
watch the parade.

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