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May 11, 1973 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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From onic oom;
Govt to Pay Injury

HAIFA — An Israeli Arab
woman was awarded the
quivalent of $2,678 by the
Israel government for injur-
r ies she suffered from a
horse frightened by the sup-
ersonic boom of a low-flying
air force plane.

Halima Muhammad Mali-
dna, 45, of Umm Al Fahm
will also have all medical
expenses paid by the state
according to a directive by
District Court Judge Yeho-
shua Gubernik. The accident
occurred in April 1970. •

The government previously
apposed the woman's claim
to $7,200 arguing that it bore
no responsibility for the
horse's reaction to the jet
boom.

W 7jahjana said she suf-
fereu. per cent permanent
Usability since she was
struck by the horse, which
was harnessed to a plow
when it ran wild in the street
in her village.

Rated No 1 in the U.S.A.
Come in and see why
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From $49.50

QUIST

TYPEWRITER
CO.
10622 W. 7 MILE ROAD
2 Mks. E. of Meyers
DI 2-1600

Philip "C incy" Sachs, one
Df the very great athletes of
this generation, who will be
honored by the Michigan
Sports Hall of Fame at a
dinner at Cobo Hall on May
21, was reminiscing this
week.
Tracing his love for basket-
ball when he first played with
the Tr-Square Club in the
Hannah Schloss Building on
High St., as a young lad
more than 60 years ago, he
had an explanation for the
disappearance of Jews from
major sports activities.
"Jews were tops in basket-
ball—and in the prizefighters
rings," Cincy recalled. It was
when there wasn't much mon-
ey — they were Depression
years—when there was noth-
ing to do. So—they played
basketball and they became
great athletes. Now?" He was
unhesitant in his indictment:
"There is too much affluence.
That's why there are so many
problems among the youth,
that is Why there are less of
our boys on the basketball
courts. and none among the
lightweights who at one time
dominate d the fighting
rings."
At the dinner on May 21,
Cincy — he earned that
nickname because he was
born in Cincinnati, April 1,
1902—will be the third Jew so
to be honored. The first was
another great in basketball,

MORRIS
BUICK

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Abandoning Basketball: Too Much Affluence

342-7100

PHILIP "CINCY" SACHS

Jacob Mazer, and the second
was Hank Greenberg, the
great Tiger star.
Reservations for the dinner
still are being taken by writ-
ing to P. 0. Box 613, Detroit
48221, or by calling 345-9523.
The dinner will be preceded
by a cocktail hour at 6 p.m.
Guests from many cities
will be at the dinner, includ-
ing Walter Kennedy, com-
missioner of the Professional
Basketball Association, Ed-
ward Gottlieb, of the South
Philadelphia Hebrew Associ-
ation, a longtime leader in
the basketball sport, and
others, including members of
the Sachs family from Cali-
fornia.
His love for the game be-
gan with the Tr-Squares and
he recalls nostalgically the
early Hannah Schloss days,
the Jewish Institute activi-
ties, the old YMHA, the
athletes in the Washington
Progressives.
He recalls that Marty Cav-
anaugh, a one-time great Ti-
ger first baseman, was the
coach for the Hannah Schloss'
YMHA basketball team.
Fred M. Butzel had taken
a deep interest in their work.
Gus Newman coached some
of the basketball teams, and
there were such greats in the
teams as Sam Raskin and
devoted lovers of the game
and participants as Hy Kei-
dan.
Among the stars who were
trained by Cincy Sachs were

the late Dr. Carl Gussin,
Suzie Schechter, who was lat-
er an All-American on the
New York City College un-
beaten team, Lloyd Goldstein
and many others who gained
fame in the sport.
While the basketball sport
now is dominated by Blacks,
Cincy commented that in
his day there was no ques-
tion about color or faith. "We
always welcomed the good
players, we always had Poles
and Negroes on our teams,"
Cincy said, "and we had
no prejudices. What counted
was ability. That's why, per-
haps, I never experienced
anti-Semitism. We didn't
know the meaning of bigotry
when there was true sports-
manship."
Cincy expressed pr id e
in the fact that he has been
chosen for an honor that had
been accorded to such greats
in athletics as Ty Cobb,
Fielding Yost, Willy Heston,
Charlie Gehringer, Gordie
Howe and others of fame.
For more than 50 years,
Cincy Sachs coached bas-
ketball. He conducted schools
for basketball players at the
University of Detroit, Grosse
Pointe University School, De-
troit Country Day School and
Boys Club on Michigan and
Livernois, and he taught the
sport to more than 2,000
youngsters.
The love youth had for him
was evidenced in his having
received the Country Day
School plaque naming him
the school's "Pied Piper,"
four years ago. He was a
leader of youth and he helped
many financially with college
tuitions and in other ways.
His brother David worked
closely with him as an asso-
ciate in manging teams, as a
player on many of the Sachs-
coached teams. David Sachs
also coached, for 11 years,
the St. Joseph Commercial
High School teams.
Cincy Sachs now lives in
Knob in the Woods with his
sisters, Clara Gilman and
Marion Sachs.

rDNI51)44FINIg-Arown Firma/7*K 'Tr 19/3-13

Soviet diplomats are studying
Hebrew in Moscow, it is re-
ported in the London press.
The speculation is that the
Kremlin wishes to prepare
its diplomats for that time
when relations will be re-
newed with the state of Is-
rael.

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