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April 27, 1973 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Detroit Heroes of Israel War of Independence
to Be Guests at ZOA TeHayim Party' Monday

Members of the Mahal who fought for Israel's lib-
group of American veterans I eration will be among those
I toasting Israel's 25th anni-
versary, at the "LeHayim
Israel" party of the Zionist
Fine Clothes For Over 36 Years
Organization of Detroit, at
the Zionist Cultural Center,
24750 TELEGRAPH
At 10 Mile Next to Dunkin' Donuts
8:30 p.m., M a y 7 — the
Open Doily to 6, Thursday to 8
actual date of Israel's Dec-
SUNDAY I 1 to 4 laration of Independence on

HARRY THOMA

Yiddish Daily Staff
in Argentina Forms
Co-op to Stay Alive

BUENOS AIRES (JTA)-
Di Yiddishe Zeitung, Buenos
Aires' Yiddish daily, resum-
ed publication last Friday
after suspending the two pre-
vious days fo rlack of funds.
The financially hard-pres-
sed newspaper informed its
readers that staff members
were organizing a coopera-
tive to take over publication
and asked for financial as-
sistance.
An ad hoc committee has
been formed to try to keep
the paper alive.
Its members are, among
others Zvi Fainguersch, for-
mer president of the Buenos
Aires Jewish Community
Council; Marcos Korenhend-
ler, vice-president of the
council; Herzl Gesang, vice
president of DAIA; and La-
zaro Rubinson, president of
Beersheba is organizing a the Agentine Zionist Organi-
professional chamber music zation.
orchestra and is advertising
for musicians that play vio-
People who ask for crit:
lin, viola, cello and double- icism are usually seeking
bass.
praise.

the Jewish calendar..
Charles "Chuck" Crudging-
ton, one of the first group of
pilots who fought for Israel,
and Harry Weinsaft, who
was a member of the crew
of the ill-fated Exodus, will
poin with Dr. Joel Hambur-
ger, Dr. Jack Greenberg,
Morris Jacobs and other
ZOD past presidents , in
saluting Israel.
The musical program that
evening will be provided by
Cantor Jacob H. Sonenklar.
Refreshments will be serv-
ed and the evening will be a
social as well as cultural
gathering to mark the cele-
bration. The entire com-
munity is invited. There will
be no admission charge and
no solicitations.

Scotch
for people
who know the
difference

Does it help that

Black & White Scotch

Friday, April 27, 1973 15

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

-

JDC/Malben Grant to Enlarge
Israel Library for the Blind

NATANYA — Israel's 20-
year-old Central Library for
the Blind, here will undergo
a major expansion this year
with the help of a IL 200,000
($47,600) grant made by Mal-
ben, the Joint Distribution
Committee program in Is-
rael.
The funds will be used for
recording on tape 100 addi-
tional books in Hebrew and
to transfer a selected number
of books from tapes to cas-
settes. Some of the money
also will be used to help
needy persons purchase play-
back machines.
Mrs. Chaya Boehm, direc-
tor of the library, said the
gift will help provide to 600
subscribers a larger number
and greater variety of books,
plays, magazine and news-
paper articles.
JDC/Malben is financed
mainly by the United Jewish
Appeal.
The library's free services
include an extensive range
of books in Braille, which
are supplied to primary and
high schools. Prayer books in
Braille also are popular.
Among the new publica-
tions are readers for pre-
school and school children.
A special feature of these
books is the combination of
the original printed books,
including the pictures, and
the Braille, which has been
added. In this way, a blind
parent can read to his sight-
ed child or grandchild, while
the child can enjoy listening
to the stories and look at the
pictures. Similarly, a blind

child can read the story in
Braille, while the sighted
parent follows his reading."
The "talking-book library"
includes some 350 books
taped in Hebrew. There are
others in English, French
and German. The most popu-
lar taped book continues to
be the Bible, recorded by
the late Yehoshua Bertonoff,
the noted Habima actor, on
67 tapes. George Orwell's
"1984" is recorded in Hebrew
on 11 tapes, while Alexander
Solzhcnitsyn's "First Circle"
required 25- tapes.
The Natanya Central Li-
brary is one of the many
forms of assistance provided
to blind Israelis by JDC/
Malben. The work of local
associations for and of the
blind is now coordinated by
a voluntary National Center
for the Blind which JDC
helped organize in 1968.
Among other projects the
Center assists are sheltered
workshops, a scholarship
program, a school to train
seeing-eye dogs and an an-
nual Hanuka candle fund-
raising campaign on behalf
of the blind.

`Gate of Peace

TEL AVIV — "Gate of
Peace," the first public
sculpture here, was unveiled
re c en t l y in Independence
Park facing the sea. The
massive structure weighing
112 tons and chiseled from
rough, antique stone, is the
work of Pietro Cascella, in-
ternationally known sculptor
and creator of the Memorial
Monument at Auschwitz.

is the smoothest of

them all?

It doesn't hurt.

Boris Smolar's

'Between You
and Me'

...

Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, JTA
(Copyright 1973, JTA Inc.)

'C? Rtft ag,Eft, THE Or"
Yew., 04St,c,fitil
a,c...4mi 4: Ca LTV.

BUCHANAN'S

B LENDED SCOTCH WHIS°

BLENDED AND BOTTLED I N SC°11

DISTILLERS
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SOU tatSTPial,,TCAR

117'CHM ANN OISTRLENG, C°"4-
NEW softx„ N.Y.

AGED, BLENDED, BOTTLED IN SCOTLAND 86 8 PROOF SCOTCH WHISKY THE FLEISCHMAN ■ ‘: ''ISTILLING CORP. NYC SOLE DISTRIBUTOR

BY BORIS SMOLAR
(Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, JTA)
(Copyright 1973, Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
HOLOCAUST REFLECTIONS: The 30th anniversary of
the uprising in the Warsaw Ghetto—proclaimed by the U.S.
Congress as a day of observance for April 29—evokes
painful feelings about the apathy shown by the U.S. gov-
ernment, and especially by the late President Roosevelt,
toward the fate of many thousands of Jews in Europe who
could have been saved from Nazi hands.
Today, refugees from Cuba, Uganda and other lands
of oppression—and Jews from the Soviet Union—are being
admitted to the United States as immigrants of a special
category, outside the immigration quota. But during the
years of the Roosevelt administration no such exceptions
were made for Jews who could have escaped Nazi annihila-
tion. Roosevelt was indifferent to pleas by Jewish leaders
to open the doors of the U.S. for Jews seeking escape. He
insisted on strict interpretation of the U.S. immigration
laws.
Never will it be forgotten that the S.S. St. Louis, carry-
ing 930 Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany was not permit-
ted to land its passengers on the American shores. The
Jews sent from the ship a desperate appeal to President
Roosevelt stressing that there were more than 400 women
and children among them. No answer came American
Jewish leaders intervened but with no effect. The ship was
turned back to Europe where most of the refugees later
fell into the hands of the Nazis in occupied lands. The New
York Times commented: "The crime of St. Louis cries
to high heaven of man's inhumanity to man."
Several years later, when other countries proved more
humane than the U.S. in admitting Jewish refugees from
Nazi-held territories Roosevelt did permit the admission
of a few hundred refugees from Europe outside of the im-
migration quota. However, he kept them isolated in a special
camp in Oswego, N.Y. They had to return to Europe when
the camp was later liquidated.
Empty troop ships were returning from Europe to the
United States during the war years. They were in a position
to carry thousands of Jews who could have been rescued
from Nazi-occupied countries.

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