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April 06, 1973 - Image 51

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Homework and Farm Work for Young Detroit Student in Israel

BY HEIDI PRESS
A former Yeshiva student
from Oak Park who worked
in his father's fruit market in
his spare time is putting his
zeal for hard work to use at
the Mollie Goodman Aca-
ademic High School for
American students in Israel.
Mark Yarsike, 15, son of
the Sam Yarsikes of Coyle
Ave., is a 10th grader at the
high school. He is taking a
general curriculum, plays
basketball and is a member
Jf the student council.
In an interview with his
mother, Mrs. Sima Yarsike,
said Mark discovered the
school in a magazine ad.
"He wrote to New York
for information about the
school," she said. "He wanted
to be with all Jews and

wanted to try dormitory life
on his own."
Last summer, his dream
came true.
Mark goes to school Sun-
day t h rough Friday. His
classes include math, Eng-

MARK YARSIKE

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lish, Jewish studies, Hebrew
and world history. The school,
located near Ashkelon, shares
facilities with Kfar Silver
Agricultural a n d Technical
high schools for Israeli stu-
dents. Both are sponsored by
the Zionist Organization of
America.
"Right now, I work in the
chicken coop," he wrote. He
has also driven a tractor. In
his letters, he asks his mother
to send his blue jeans.
However, there is time for
relaxing at school. Mark's
parents have relatives in Is-
rael, and every other Friday,
he is allowed to leave the
school to see them. He takes
other side trips, sometimes
with counselors and students.
"Once he went to the Wail-
ing Wall to say a prayer for
his sick uncle," his mother
said. "It wasn't an open day,
but the prinicpal, Jacob
Leiter, let him go."
Mark, who likes to travel,
has seen most of Israel.
Earlier this month his class
got special permission from
the Israel army to visit the
Suez Canal. He has visited
Masada, Sinai, Eilat and fre-
quently goes into Ashkelon to
buy personal items. He takes
buses everywhere and al-
ways mentions that they are
expensive.
Mrs. Yarsike said that
Mark has changed since an
earlier letter in which he
expressed dissatisfaction with
the school_ "He's made a lot

of friends and likes the princ-
ipal and his teachers. His
most recent letter shows the
change. "The principal al-
ways says to me that I'm
doing great in school. I'm
doing the best in the math
class, I'm also one of the
best in Hebrew and world
history."
Mark has always been an
active student at the ZOA-
sponsored high school. He is
usually the captain of the
basketball team, wrote his
friend David Hochman from
Minnesota, who also attends
the school. Mark was elected
to the student council and he
co-authored a Hanuka play.
At Hanuka he wrote that he
opened a `dreidel casino' in
his room. "Thirty kids came,
and I won IL 4. (About $1)."
The Yarsike family is or-
thodox. When Mark first
came to the school he wasn't
accustomed to the food and
spent his pocket money on
chocolates and gum.
But the school observes
Kashrut, and Mark soon ad-
justed. Students attend Sab-
bath services on Friday
nights and Saturday morn-
ings. After services, Mark
usually visits relatives, most
of whom have emigrated from
Poland, his parents' native
country.
The second of four children,
Mark worked in his father's
store to help pay for his tui-
tion — $1,800 for the school
year beginning in September.
It covers the cost of registra-
tion, room, board, books,
laundry, tours and medical
care. Students must pay for

`Bat Mitzva Belles'
Explore Jewish Life
and Current Topics

Interdating and intermar-
riage, the meaning of kash-
rut and preparation of the
home for 'holidays are areas
explored by the "Bat Mitzva
Belles", a newly organized
group of seventh and eighth
grade girls in Cong. Beth
Shalom's Hebrew school.
Their monthly Sunday
morning meetings begin with
a prayer service in which
the girls take turns as lead-
ers. These services include
contemporary and traditional
prayers. Discussion groups
on current topics follow the
service, and often there are
lessons in the preparation of
special holiday dishes.
Mrs. David A. Nelson, wife
of the congregation's rabbi,
and Mrs. Edward Salem are
advisers.

Elizabeth Klein
Elected President
by Beth Jacob Girls

MAY

, p.m. — The Ron Maxwell Show: Ron Maxwell plays your
dedications and requests. Call Ron at 352-9744, or 352-WSHJ.

MONDAY

6:30 p.m. -- Hear Tonight: Will 1973 be the year of the
Tiger? Tim Downy, Mike Gordon and WSHJ sports director
Alan Muskovitz will discuss the Detroit Tigers upcoming season.

TUESDAY

6:30 p.m. — Entertainment Plus: Esther Wein reviews the longest
running off Broadway show "The Fantasticks," written by Tom
Jones and Harvey Schmidt.

WEDNESDAY

3:40 p.m. — Southfield High baseball: The WSHJ sports team of
Bob Garber and Larry Hersh bring you all the baseball action
as Southfield starts its season opener against Hazel Park.

6:30 p.m. — City Council Highlights: Howard Goldberg brings
you the highlights of Southfield's city council meetings.

THURSDAY

12:20 p.m. — A La Carte: Lindy Rich gives helpful ideas to
housewives.

Elizabeth Klein was elected
president of the student body
at Beth Jacob School in Oak
Park during recent elections.
Judy Kresch was elected
secretary and Anne Feibush
treasurer.
Following school tradition,
the 1973 seniors served as
the nominating committee,
choosing the three candidates
for each office.
The new officers will sit as
observers at all meetings till
the end of the year to become
acquainted with operations of
the student organization.
Campaigning was lively,
and the candidates vied for
votes with posters, souvenirs
and speeches. Marsha Fein
reports that the winners cele-
brated their victory by treat-
ing the losers to a game of
bowling, an old tradition at
Beth Jacob School.

transportation and small ex-
penses.
The 520-acre acmpus, es-
tablished in 1967, includes
dormitories, classrooms and
labs, a medical clinic, a syna-
gogue and kosher dining hall,
a library and auditorium, and
numerous sports facilities.
Mrs. Yarsike's son would
like to finish his high school
education in Israel, but she
would rather have her son at
home. Nevertheless, Mrs.
Yarsike did most of the plan-
ning for Mark's nine-month
stay in Israel.

Israel Role
Vital in Free
World: Begin

Friday, April 6, 1973-39

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Israeli Crime Rate Mounting

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Is-
rael's crime rate rose last
year by 4.3 per cent, com-
pared to a 6 per cent rise
in 1971 and a 9.5 per cent rise
in 1970, according to the an-
nual Israel Police Report.
The report revealed that
murder was up by 17 per cent
and rape by 30 per cent.
There were 49 murders in
1972 compared to 31 the year
before. There were 504 cases
or rape last year.
Armed robbery, one of the
largest causes of public con-
cern in recent years, dropped
by 3.1 per cent.
White collar crime such as
embezzlement and issuing
bad checks rose by 30 per
cent with 5,923 cases being
recorded. -
There was a significant
drop in the number of drug
offenses reported, which was
attributed to the declining
availability of drugs in the
country. The higher price of
drugs has also been a factor
in the decline, police said.
The decline of crime in the
Tel Aviv area was attributed

to the addition of border pol-
ice units in the city. Police
also reported success in curb-
ing hooliganism in the big
cities.
Traffic fatalities declined
by one per cent, as compared
to a 24 per cent increase the
year before. There were 661
fatalities in 1972. The num-
ber of traffic accidents rose
by 3.7 per cent, totaling
15,333.

If thou wouldst not be
known to do anything, never
do it.—Ralph Waldo Emerson

Bar Mitzva
Weddings - Etc.

INVITATIONS
25% Discount

NEW YORK (JTA)—Mena-
hem Begin, the Herut leader
and a leader of the Gahal
opposition faction in Israel,
Greeting Cards •
declared here Sunday that
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Israel still plays a role of
strategic importance to the
free world, even though
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He said that role was es-
tablished by the continued WHH HHHHHIMIHMHIMHHHHHHHIMMIHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHIMIHIMM
presence of Israeli troops on
the eastern banks of the Suez
Canal.
E KOSHER MEATS & POULTRY, INC. .1 2 -
As long as the canal re-
mains close d, Russia is
Originators of the Harvard Roast
denied easy access to the
Middle East and East Asian
countries by sea.
Begin spoke at the 24th
annual dinner of the Jewish
National Fund, marking the
25th anniversary of Israel's
independence.
He reiterated his conten-
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Begin said he thought that
Israel should solve the prob-
lem of Arab refugees within
its own borders but that the
refugee problem in Arab
countries was for the Arabs
to solve.
Arabs who live in Israel
should be granted Israeli
citizenship if they ask for it,
he said, and even those who
refuse citizenship deserve
"full equality of rights," he
added.
According to Begin, Zion-
ism's task over the next 25
years is to see to it that a
majority of the world's Jews
. . . in the
live in Israel.

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Tenth Generation
in Mendenhall Book

University o f Michigan
Prof. George E. Mendenhall,
a leading biblical scholar, is
the author of a new book,
"The Tenth Generation: the
Origins of the Biblical Tradi-
tion," published by Johns
Hopkins University Press.
The "tenth generation"
symbolizes the generation
that caused or experienced a
discontinuity of civilization
every 250-200 years through-
out the first half of human
history.

Bnai Moshe Carnival

A carnival with games,
prizes and refreshments will
be held by Bnai Moshe
Senior United Synagogue
Youth 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday
at the synagogue.
Harold Youra, carnival
chairman, said the public is
invited.

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SUNDAY 12 TO 5

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