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March 23, 1973 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jewish Baseball Players in 1973 • Steve Greenberg's Invitation

PRICE!
2 OR 1 COMPLETE

- By IRWIN COHEN

less he gives a good showing
There will be eight Jewish in spring training. He is
EVERY MON, d TUES. MITES
ballplayers in the major Steve Greenberg, Hank
leagues this year. One is a Greenberg's son.
COME WHERE THE
,;.
ACTION IS!
rookie and may not stick un-
Steve is 24, and is 6 feet
' DANCING
2, with a playing weight of
, MON. THRU SAT.
195. He's a graduate of Yale,
LENNIE SCHICK
and during his college days
QUARTET
concentrated mostly on play-
p ANGEL'S
ing tennis. Last year at Den-
HOUR GLASS
FOR PARTIES ver, he hit .264 with 11 home
moo W. *NICHOLS
6 Blocks West of Southfield
runs.
538-4850
Steve is primarily a first
basemen but can play the
outfield. Right now Steve
Greenberg is in training with
the Texas Rangers, who also
have another Jewish player

in first baseman Mike Ep-
A/S/U
stein.
22900 MICHIGAN AVENUE,
Mike came to the Rangers
Dearborn (in the Holiday Inn)
in an off season trade with
Specializing in Meeting the Most Discriminating Tastes
the World Champion Oakland
With Superior Food, Fine Wines and Cocktails.
Athletics. Mike calls himself
DINNERS SERVED
"Super Jew," but in the
PARTIES FOR
MON.-SAT., 5 to 11 p.m.
All OCCASIONS
minds of religious Jews
SUN., 12 NOON-10 p.m.
LUNCHEONS SERVED
` BANQUET FACIUTIES
doesn't rate that title. He
MON.-SAT., 11 to 2 p.m.
AVAILABLE UP TO 300
decided to play on Yom Kip-
FOR RESERVATIONS
pur last year and had his
278-6900
ENTERTAINMENT TUES,SAY. ;
greatest day in baseball get-
ting five hits. After Yom
Kippur he dropped off sharp-
1y. He didn't get a hit in the
entire World Series, and was
taken out for defensive pur-
PRIVATE ROOM -FOR
• PARTIES
poses in the final innings
• BAR MITZVAS
• SALES MEETINGS
of crucial games. Manager
_
• BANQUETS
Dick Williams benched him
for the all important deciding
Gala St. Pat's Day Festivities!
game. The final blow came
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS NOW!
when owner Charlie Finley
traded Mike to the last place
* UVE ENTERTAINMENT
535-6090
* EXCELLENT CUISINE
Rangers for an unknown
* SUPER COCKTAILS
pitcher.
24502
W.
7
Mile
Rd.

* DANCING
First baseman Ron Blom-
3 Blks. W. of Telegraph
* PLENTY OF PARKING
berg of the New York Yan-
kees is one player who will
not play on Rosh Hashana
and Yom Kippur. Ron is 24,
and the Yankees feel he will
be one of the biggest stars
in baseball in the not too dis-
tant future.
Other Jewish players in the
American League are pitch-
ers Ken Holtzman of the Oak-
land Athletics, Steve Stone
of the Chicago White Sox,
and shortstop Rick Auerbach
of the Milwaukee Brewers.
The National League has
two Jewish players, outfield-
ers Norm Miller of the Hous-
ton Astros, and Richie
Scheinblum of the Cincinnati
Reds.
Stephen David Greenberg
is the No. 2 son of Hall of

PRIME RIB
DINNER

ADAM'S
RIB

544-1240

Oah

-

lig

1

CH AMPIONS HII
WRESTLING

OLYMPIA - 8:00 P.M.

SUNDAY,EV APR
R

_

MAIN

1

DICK THE BRUISER
vs
ERNIE LADD

FOR THE WWA HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP
CHAMPION
CHALLENGER

BARON VON RASCHKE

vs

MITSU ARAKAWA

COWBOY BOB ELLIS
vs
YUKON "Moose" CHOLAK

HIGO HAMAGUCHI

THE BEAST

GIRLS'

vs

BOBBY BOLD EAGLE

CLEM TURNER

i TEAM BOUT

PRINCESS JASMINE

MARY JANE MULL

RAQUEL DUBOIS

T.N. TURNER

SPECIAL NOTICE!
Camera and Autograph Night with
COWBOY BOB ELLIS at 7 P.M.

SPECIAL BONUS: Children (14 years old and under) HALF PRICE
Tickets are priced at $5, $4 and $3 and can be purchased at the Olympia
Box Office and all J. L. Hudson's & Sears Stores. Watch Championship
Wrestling every Friday night following the late movie, at. 9 (CKLW).
Fenced, lighted and attended parking for 2,500 cars adjacent to Olympia.

Fa m e r Hang Greenberg.
Steve Greenberg is one of
many young players on the
Texas Ranger roster, but be-
cause of his father and a sur-
prisingly fast rise within the
Ranger organization, his is a
special story.

Steve's a 6'2", 195-pound,
24-year-old and had a late
start in baseball because he
was getting a degree from
Yale. When he signed a con-
tract, there wasn't a scout in
the system who rated him a
major league prospect.
Now, three years later, the
organization's most respected
minor league manager, Del
Wilber, figures Greenberg is
the answer to the club's third
base problems. Maybe not
this year, because of a lack
of seasoning, but in the very
near future, he'll take over,
Wilber claims.
Greenberg is known as a
guy with an ever-present
friendly smile and gritty de-
termination. "He's probably
the hardest worker I've ever
been associated with in base-
ball." Wilber, who managed
him last season 'at Denver,
said, "Always the first on
the field and the last to
leave."
Steve has this to say, "I've
played in places like Geneva
and Pittsfield and Burlington
the last few years, and peo-
ple were always asking me
if I can hit like my old man.

I tell them you wouldn't see
me beating around down here
in the bushes if I could.
"Hang Greenberg was a
great hitter. I happen to be
his son, who has average
talent.
"Because I'm Hank's son,
people ask me if there's extra
pressure, but really there's
none at all, from either my
father or my teammates. I
certainly wasn't pushed into
being a baseball player. I
didn't even play until high
school. I skipped Little
League and all that. In fact,
my father jokingly tells me
all the time that he didn't
send me to Yale to be a ball-
player.
"As far as my teammate's,
I'll bet that 90 per cent of the
guys I've played with the last
three years didn't even know
who Hank Greenberg was,
much less what he did. It
amuses me. People don't be-
lieve it, but it's true. Like I
don't 'go around advertising
who my dad is, but the word

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
28-Friday, March 23, 1973

will get out and I'll have guys
come up and say they heard
my father was a pretty good
player. They want to know
about him."
Manager Whitey Herzog is
in a pleasant predicament be-
cause of Steve's sudden de-
velopment. During spring
training he planned to look
almost exclusively at Joe Lo-
vitto, Bill McNulty and possi-
bly Jim Mason in an attempt
to fill the hole at third base.
Herzog says, "But I've got
to give Greenberg as much
playing time as those other
guys, because this kid has
got some good equipment,
and I like the way he works."
Steve Greenberg has an ex-
cellent chance of making the
team because he can also
play first base and the out-
field.
If Steve makes the team,
the Texas Rangers will be-
come the only b a 11 c lub with
two Jewish players, the other
being Steve's competitor at
first base Mike Epstein.

Prof. Liptzin Honors Laikin

In a syndicated review of
"Memoirs of a Practical
Dreamer" by Benjamin M.
Laikin, published by Bloch,
Prof. Solomon Liptzin of
American College in Jerusal-
em pays honor to the Detroit
author of the autobiography
in which he reconstructs his
life's experiences and com-
munal labors. Laikin's book
first appeared in Yiddish and
has just been published in an
English translation.
Dr. Liptzin describes the
recorded account of Laikin's
life in Russia, then in Barn:
more, Philadelphia and in the
Pennsylvania c o a 1 mines,
leading up to "his present
autumnal years in Detroit"
where he prospered, became
a leader in Labor Zionism, in
the Yiddish schools and many
other communal activities.
Dr. Liptzin states in his com-
ments "Often he met with
frustrations in these activi-
ties, since he did not see eye
to eye with the leaders of
Jewish national organizations
and was far too combative in
voicing his disagreements.
But he also found fulfillment
as he witnessed a dream
come true, Israel rearisen,
and his friends, the Labor
Zionists, at the helm of gov-
ernment in the new state.
"Though severe in his ap-
praisal of pompous pillars of
Jewish society, unveiling
their follies and failings,
Laikin does not gloss over
his own errors of judgment.
Self-educated and impelled
by ethical attitudes rooted in
the shtetl of his childhood
and boyhood, he now and then
let Utopian visions intrude
upon his practical work and
then paid the price in suffer-

MOVIE
GUIDE

IkHo 0 D
N
Americana Complex I, II, III

,

Greenfield Rd., N. of 9 Mile
358.1414
358-3920

AMERICANA I

Julie Andrews in

"SOUND OF MUSIC"

Wednesday Ladies Day
Special Matinees $1
Open 12:30 - 1 Show Only

AMERICANA II

Steve McQueen, Ali Macgraw

"THE GETAWAY"

Wed. Ladies Day Special
Matinee $1
Open 12:30 - 1 Show Only.

AMERICANA III

Ryan O'Neal in

"THE THIEF WHO CAME
TO DINNER"

Wednesday Ladies Day
Special Matinee $1
Open 12:30 - 1 Show Only

12 Mile-C oolidge
LI 2-0330
15 academy award winners incl.
Shelly Winters, Gene Hackman,
Ernest Borgnine.

BERKLEY

ing and in disillusionment
with imperfect fellow-men.
POSEIDON ADVENTURE"
Nevertheless, he did succeed "THE
FRI. open 7:00, shown 7:20, 9:25
in rising from poverty to-
Saturday, re-open 5:15,
Shown 5:35, 7:40, 9:40
moderate affluence and he
Sunday open. 1:00, shown
did make a significant im-
1:20, 3:25, 5:25, 7:30, 9:30
Week nights open 6:45,
pact upon- his community,
shown 7:05, 9:10
The Yiddish causes he cham- SAT. MATINEE
open 1:00, over
pioned were neither glamor- 3:30.
"HUCKELBERRY FINN"
& Cartoon
ous nor popular, but his es-
pousal won them greater sup-
BIRMINGHAM Maple
port and more prestige.
"DELIVERANCE"
"Laikin's reminiscences not
WEEK DAYS OPEN 7:00
only cast light upon the in-
Shown 7:20, 9:30
ner motivation of an unusual SAT. & SUN. at 6:00, 8:00 & 10:00
personality 'but also mirror SAT. & SUN. KIDDIE MATINEE
"HUCKELBERRY FINN"
the many changes that have at 1:00
& 3:00-All Seats 75c
overtaken Jewish Detroit Fri. & Sat. MIDNITE MADNESS
"ROSEMARY'S
BABY"
during the past half century. WED. MAT. at 1:00 1 show
only $1
His book enriches our under-
at 11:15. All Seats $1.50.
standing of American Jewish
2 bks.
BLOOMFIELD W
reality."
'ward MI 4-6006

Paul Newman in

Fash Bash to Benefit
Youtheater Program

Some 15 stars of broadcast,
journalism and sports will
model clothes to be auctioned
and another 50 celebrities
will be in the audience urg-
ing of the bidding at Fash , /
Bash III, the fashion auction
and dance benefiting the Art
Institute's Detroit Youtheater
6:30 p.m. Monday at Cobo
Hall.
Sponsored by the Jun i or
Council of the Detroit Insti-
tute of Arts' Founders Society
to aid the live s t a g e pro-
grams of the museum ,
Flash/Bash III will also offer
free food and dancing to the
21-piece Brookside Jazz En-
semble.
Tickets may be picked up
at the Art Institute. More
than 250,000 'Detroit area pu-
pils are enjoying this year's
season of live entertainment
in the auditorium or in the
schools themselves.

"THE LIFE & TIMES OF
JUDGE ROY BEAN" (PG)

Fri. 6:20, 8:30. Sat. 2:00, 4:05,
6:20, 8:35.
Sun. 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50, 10:00
Fri. & Sat. MIDNITE MADNESS
Open 11 p.m.
"ROSEMARY'S BABY" (R)
All Seats $1.50.
Wed. Starts "CABARET"
Matiness at 1:00
1 Show Only - $1.

Warren a t Miller
581-5 040
Shelly Winters - Gene Hackman

CAMELOT W

"THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE"

Mon. thru Fri. 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:10, 10:15
Wednesday Matinee at 1:00
1 Show Only - $1

MAI KAI

Plymouth Rd. 9374001
at Farmington Road

"FIDDLER ON THE ROOf"

MON. THRU THUR. 6:25 & 9:30
FRI. 7:00, 10:15
SAT. 1:00, 3:55, 7:00, 10:15
SUN. 12:45, 3:30, 6:20, 9:30
WED. MATINEE
1 Show Only at 1:00-51

Nationalism

Nationalism is an infantile
disease. It is the measles of
mankind.-Albert Einstein.

Wonderful evening of music!

CELEBRATED MELODIES

FROM

_

GREAT COMPOSERS

played and discussed from the stage by

JAMES DICK

Brilliant young winner
of 10 awards
in personal evening
shares insight into
music of piano masters

Concert Pianist
Auditorium, Friday, April 6, 8:30 p.m.

THE DEIROIT INSTITITE OF ARTS

Founders Concert Series; Edith J. Freeman, Chairman

Art Institute Office (831-4678, 831-0360), All Hudson's $6, $5, $4
Or Write Concert Series, 5200 Woodward, Detroit 48202

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