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March 10, 1972 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1972-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Telaa.1501581CM7A0C.7.5

4c

BY.108041 Iret**
BureaifiGbief14
`WASHINGTON
"Secre-,
tary of State William P.:Rodgers'
put renewed, ciniihasis Tuesday on
' reopening'. the' Suez Canal through
an interim'agreentent between Is-
rael and Egypt' and • strongly re-
affirmed_ that the -area's military-
balance will be maintained by the

farm

-

U.S.

In a personal introduction to a
604-page State Department report
on American foreign policy, Rogers
stiminarized • his Middle East goal
for 1972 as -follows:-
"It will- be a year of sustained
effort to continue the cease fire in
the Middle East and to bring about
an interim Suez Canal agreement
as an initial step toward peace .. .
We are determined not to permit
the military balance to tip against
Israel."
Rogers reiterated his oft-stated
support for United Nations re-
presentative Gunnar B. Jarring's
"efforts to achieve - an over-all
settlement" and the secretary's
belief that "steps to achieve an
interim agreement complement
these efforts."
He warned: "Without progress
on a settlement, the relative calm
of 1971 threatens to give way to
new hostilities. We must not sit by
inactively and watch that happen."
"The over-all level of worldwide
U.S.-Soviet tensions continued to
diminish (in 1971)," Rogers said,
commenting that "Its (the Soviet
Union record in the Middle East
was at best mixed."
"Our' relations will not be har-
monious, therefore," he continued,
"until further evolution in Soviet
Thinking overcomes the temptation
to exploit explosive situations for
national advantage. We will discuss
these issues frankly with the Soviet
leaders in May."
In a three-paragraph section on
Soviet Jewry, Rogers said, "The
willingness of the' Soviet govern-
ment to permit some thousands of
Soviet Jews to emigrate was wel-
comed as a step forward by the
American people but did not' les-
sen concern in this country over
the status of Jews in the Soviet
Union." President Nixon's State
of the World report on Jan. 20 did
not include this issue.
As to referring to U.S. moves to
help Soviet Jews, Rogeri•Condemn-
ed "violent and 'Mega actions
against Soviet --personnel" -in the
U.S. which, he pointed out, "con-
tinued throughout 1971." .
Mentioning the alleged firing
of shots into- the Soviet mission •
in New York, which he said
"generated especially serious
concern • about extremist -acti-
vity," Rogers noted that the re- -
ported act "did not aid the cause
of Soviet Jewry but adversely -af-
fected U.S. relations with the
Soviet Union." - •
In asserting that the military bal-
ance- will be. maintained, Rogers
said that "We have continued to
sell U.S. military equipment and
supplies" to Israel "in response to
the large shipments. of arms by the
Soviet Union to Egypt in 1969 and -
1970 and to the increased direct
Soviet operational involvement in
Egypt's air defense • system."
Rogers pointed out that the
Soviet-E6r ptian friendship- treaty
of May 1971 and the October
agreement at the end of President
Anwar Sadat's visit to MOscOw . on
"specific measures to strengthen
the military might of Egypt" were
"developments (that) • did 'not -con-
tribute to the cause of peace in the
Middle East."
"US. military and economic as-

-

Liberty and Resistance
The history of liberty is a his-
torn of resistance. The history of
liberty is a history of limitations
of governmental power, not the in-
crease of it.—Woodrow Wilson.

Lean

sistancejianr;belyied Israet to...pro-
d:Fess econoniicalry, *spite of its
heavy` defense burden?' 'Rogers
'added Iiidieafing bis wish for for-
mat diplomatic ties, with Cairo,
Rogers said that "we would like
and continue ready•to resume' (the)
normal,. across-the-board relations
with Egypt."
He noted that there has -been
"significant" private American in-
vestment- in Egyptian petroleum.
"A major complicating factor be-
tween the U.S. and Egypt," Rogers
said, "continues to be the large
Soviet military presence there,
with its unsettling implications' for
NATO in the Eastern Mediterran-
ean and for the military balance
in the Middle _East."
The "continued independence and
stability" of what Rogers called
"moderate" Jordan "is an essential
element in the search for an Arab-
Israeli peace settlement," the sec-
retary said. "Jordan must be strong
and -viable to make a positive con-
tribution to-ward an enduring
peace in the area." •
Regarding Lebanon, Rogers
noted that "Lebanon remained

.,

-

ame

-

animpintint regional center for= the page; showed Rogers and King
But with Golda. Meir, the secre-
hundreds of American business Hussein jovially shaking hands. tary and the Israeli premier stood
firms.” The U.S., he elaborated, Another photo found him seated looking in opposite directions, open-
accounted for around 10 per cent comfortably with a smiling Presi- mouthed and unsmiling as if at-
of Lebanon's total imports. He dent Anwar Sadat.
tracted by other matters.
noted that last November the
Lebanese purchased a modest THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, Mitch 10, 1972-23
amount of arms from the USSR

on a one-time basis, but said he
"expected (that) the bulk of their
arms needs will be purchased
from the U.S. and Europe."
Rogers found encouragement in
Syria - too. While diplomatic rela-
No other food or drink on earth can mean so much
tions have not been resumed, he
to your health—as the water you drink! Mountain Val-
observed, Damascus has "shown
ley Water offers you so
some interest in encouraging
... so delicious you'll enjoy each glassful;
American business to re-enter the
... so "light" on the system, drinking it is a joy;
market and, accordingly, has taken
... totally free from pesticides, detergents, urban
steps -toward settlemdnt of certain
wastes or any additives;
debts owed to U.S. government
... virtually sodium-free.
agencies."
Mountain
Valley Water ig excellent for all the family,
In both tone and content, the
all the time. For health, drink Mountain Valley Water
Rogers report seemed eager to
every day.
provide a friendly word for almost
FOR HOME DEUVERY:
every Middle East state.
A page in the Mid East section
Phone LO 7-0178
Write-3343 Gratiot, Detroit, Mich. 48207
was devoted to three photographs,
and in them Amman and Cairo
HoLs
CrErGs.
easily had the better of Jerusalem.
Available in Most Markets, Drug
Parry Store;
The largest photo, at the top of

. 11•111

Your Health Begins
...WITH WATER

.pountainValley Water

LKER'S

new way to buy"

MEN'S CLOTHING
O by 40%

How does Walks:K.8dr) it? Walker's doesn't do it
... alone; yojir
t cooperate to make these
big sayings
Walker's buys in large
quantities, - c
40 market for values, and
operates On
4 4ielteale-type markup. But
. it,is yo
be vir fli ng to wait on your-
self-for
rego expensive dis-
plays and
*briy without alter-
ations, w
, l#Out delivery. It is
you who
pily4oh . . . without
credit, w'

-1 . '

HOW D

ATORW?1-'1,

It's easy

o 1iriVite4Frieney-saving way. For
example,
a su i t. (1) go to the suit
departm0
rife racks marked with
ydur size,, (?) _
all you, like and see how
much you see
hijitijyou look at (both
manufactyA-Areggeeted retail prices and
Walker's prc areclearlyrfrarked), (3) try on
your seleetior0 in the fitting room, and (4) when
you are ready; check out at the cashier.

`

WHAT ABOUT QUALITY?

At Walker's you cf15 (
nationally-adver-
tised clothing such+,;,,
ye seen at better
men's stores. Don't_ ma
turers object to
Walker's low prices2-:Sometirnes ... and when
they do, Walker's rmerely,
labels. But
even then, yOu
4:60‘40; .recognizing
!1*‘.'m
the quality of-the fabric :141

co* the

HOW GOOD IS SELE

,
Selection at Walker S is fenteSteefou'll seenew-
est spring suits, coats, aisaii*O'ffi, and slacks by
the hundreds . . Lets of cainialcipthing toe: More
knits than you've ever seery,beforeliAnd you won't
believe the varietyyou'll rOnd,In your size.

WHAT ABOUT_ Of

ma

"

Walker's does iitr-fittirig
kes no altera-
,,
flans. But that's:no prOtrlerii:=
ask and receive
a list of tailors who m a *alterations at a
reasonable price.

YOU GET THE MOST FOR Y OUR CLOTHING DOLLAR AT

illa411060.1161610111allai

WALKER'S

111101111..1111119.19”1”1.11.111.

WHERE YOU DON'T PAY FOR FRILLS YOU CAN'T WEAR

OPEN DAILY 9:30 TO 6; THURSDAY, FRIDAY TO 9; SUNDAY 11 TO 5

27319 SOUTHFIELD RD., LATHRUP VILLAGE

2 blocks north of 11 Mile Rd. • Telephone 356-2228

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