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February 25, 1972 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1972-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Dollar Devaluation BoostsJD,C Costs
Overseas, Clfaiinian 'Cifisheeg'Warns

GENEVA — The devaluation of
the Americati'dollar is expected to
ri
have a serious
financial impact on
the Joint Distribution Committee's
overseas and refugee and relief
programs for Eastern Europe, Ed.
ward Ginsberg of Cleveland, JDC's
newly-elected chairman, said here.
Accompanied by Samuel L.
Haber of New York, JDC execu-
tive vice-chairman, the Cleveland
lawyer spent what he called two
"eye-opening" days in JDC's over-
seas headquarters here.
While in Geneva, he and Haber
met with JDC Director-General
Louis D. Horwitz and his staff of
consultants who plan and super-
vise refugee operations and health,
education and welfare programs
which serve over 300,000 Jews in
25 countries. There are many crit-
ical areas around the world which
especially affect the Jewish ccm-
munities and are of primary con-
cern to the JDC.
"Provisional estimates indicate
that operational costs in 1972
will rise by nearly $600,000 In
Europe, North Africa and other
areas because of the devalua-
tion," Ginsberg said. "Fortunate-
ly, Israel and Iran, with two of
JDC's largest programs, will not
be affected. However, we are
faced with the necessity to find
over half a million dollars above
and beyond the budgeted amount
for the current year."
The JDC leader pointed out that
North Africa was high on the
agenda as a potentially explosive
area where the Jewish commu-
nities have been weakened by
years of migration and the fate of
the remaining Jews hang in the
balance.
"What concerns JDC is a group
of hundreds of aged, handicaped
and helpless people left behind,
plus, especially in Morocco, sev-
eral thousand children for whom

health care and Jewish schooling
are more vital then ever . With th
community leaders gone or going
JDC has had to take over more
direct responsibility. One step ha
been a census of aged Jews JD
has been making in Tunisia an
Morocco to see if they have rela
tives in France or elsewhere whom
they could join."
"Jews subjected to discrimina
Lion and worse in Arab countrie
and certain Eastern Europea
countries are our number one pri
ority," Ginsberg said. "Directl
and indirectly, we do as much a
we can; also we cooperate with
other international organizations
It is very gratifying to hear tha
even now the 'Joint' is still a house
hold word among the Jews of Rus
sia."
Ginsberg pointed out that th
Russian movement has ahead
begun to make an impact on JDC/
Malben's programs for the aged
sick and handicaped among new
mmigrants to Israel.
"Fortunately, the proportion of
elderly people among the Rus-
sian newcomers is relatively
small," he said "Nevertheless,
420 new arrivals have been re-
ferred to !When for medical
care and other assistance in the
past few months."
"Helping handicaped new immi
grants is what JDC has always
d one in Israel," Ginsberg said
'And we will continue doing it.
B ut the social needs in Israel are
o different now from 20 years
a go that JDC's response has to
b e different too."
As one of the most critical gaps,
Ginsberg cited services for the
rowing
number of aged among
g
srael's population. He said that
his was why three years ago JDC,
n cooperation with local bodies,
reated the Association for the
P lanning and Development of Ser-
ices for the Aged. It will take
0 ver five years and at least $10,-
S. African Oil Firm
000,000—half from JDC, half from
Denies Jewish Bias
l ocal sources—to finish the project.
The JDC leader stressed that
JOHANNESBURG (JTA) — The
Esso-Standard Oil Co. of South J DC/Malben is also doing more
Africa denied that it has a policy th ings and new things in its other
tr aditional areas of concern in Is-
against hiring Jews.
The denial by the firm's man- r ael, notably services for handi-
aging director, E. Hartman, fol- aped children and for the chroni-
lowed publication of a story in the c ally and mentally ill.
Sunday Express that Sharon Har-
ber was refused a job because she
is Jewish.
The paper claimed that Miss
ae41
Herber_ said she was told this
point blank by the Esso official
who interviewed her. The Ex-
press also quoted an employment
agency official who said an Esso
spokesman told him when he in-
quired about Miss Herber, "You
know we don't take Jews."
Hartman said the company offi-
cial who interviewed the girl had
th
no authority
to make such a state-
ment, and in fact, the company had
employed Jews.
One of them, I. Berman, told the
JTA that he worked for Esso South
Africa in 1969-1970 and that rela-
tions had been most cordial.

.

Job Shortages

Hit httini4rant
Professionals

NEW YORK (JTA)—Asserting
that Jewry's primary aim is to
"preserve (its) brilliant heritage,"
Israeli U. N. Ambassador Yo,sef
Tekoah said that the new Ency-
clopedia Judaica was "indispen-
gable" ,r,istt, (my „to ischools but to
Jewish homes.

Tekoah spoke at ceremonies at
the headquarters of the Federa-
tion of Jewish Philanthropies of
New York, honoring 13 members
of Federation's commission on
synagogue relations who contrib-
uted articles to the 16-volume set.

Experts speculating on the pos-
sibility of an agreement with Israel

for the use of her ports by the
Sixth Fleet believe that such an
arrangement will not materialize
in the very near future. These an-
nouncements were timed to coin-
cide with the arrival in Washing.
ton of a Soviet delegation prepar-
ing President Nixon's forthcoming
visit to Moscow in May.
Political
observers
interpret
these events as part of an over-
all strategy to insure that Mr.
Nixon will be able to deal with
the Kremlin from a position of
strength and not of weakness.

I

GARAGE DOOR

kl.TARNOIN
&Co.

Call Evenings Until IP

353-3284

SEE OR CA1.1.

ANDY BLAU

in BIR INGHAM at

WI LSON-CRISSMA N CADILLAC

CALL BUS. MI 4-1930
RES. 642-6836
1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM

• Passover Cruise
to the Caribbean,
fully "1:72, with all the
traditional observances.

WASHINGTON, D.C. ( ZINS )—

use of Pireaus as a U.S. Sixth
Fleet base in the Mediterranean.

ELECTRONIC
OPENER

Vernco

NEW CADILLAC?

Israel Support Seen
in U.S.-Greek Pact

Veteran military analysts attach
great importance to • an Ameri-
can agreement with Greece for the

Macmillan, called the'lncyclopeclia
a "unique" publishing event. He
had been surprised, he said that
the editors had managed to "get
Jewish opinion so well organized."

The Encyclopedia Judaica's
published worldwide by the Mac-
millan Co. and in Jerusalem by
Keter Publishing House Ltd.
Jeremiah Kaplan, president of

of absorbing Russian immigrants
with university degrees would be
relatively greater than for others
because the Russians were used
to a different type of economy and
pattern of skills.
So far, he said, jobs have been
readily available for them, with
few exceptions. But in 1972 their
employment will be a major chal-
lenge to the success of the absorp-
tion program, he said.

0
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0
0
0
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0

March 27, from New York, $425 up.
11 Days to Bermuda, Barbados,

Martinique, St. Thomas
This cruise is completely devoted to a joyous and
faithful observance of the entire Passover holiday, and
a cantor will be on board. The warmth of the traditional
Seder; Kosher for Passover foods, prepared in our Kash-
ruth Idtchens; all under the supervision of a rabbi. Spe-
cial rates for children—the whole family together for the
holiday. Caribbean ports rich in Jewish heritage. And
the hearty conviviality of the Greeks to make this the
most festive Passover possible. On the fully air condi-
tioned and stabilized Queen Anna Maria, the newly
decorated, luxurious 26,300-ton flagship of the Greek
Line. For folder, reservations, see
your Travel Agent or Greek Line,

2352 First \ at imial Bldg
Dot roil. Mich. (3)3) %I-5280

......

THE LANDSMANSHAFTEN

Greek Line

Registry: Greece

IL I,

SOCIETIES OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT

CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO THEIR ANNUAL

Purim Celebration

Wednesday, March 1, 1972 at 8:15 p.m_

0

0
0

at Congregation B'nai Moshe

WEST TEN MILE ROAD AT KENOSHA

GUEST SPEAKER

TOASTMASTER

GUEST ARTIST

GUEST ARTIST

THE HONORABLE

Ex-Nazi Free Despite
Evidence of War Crimes

BONN (JTA)—A former Nazi
" who- has been accused of assisting
in the murder of at least 400 Jew-
ish men, women and children dur-
ing,,World War II has been set
freeafter a three-montli, lot trial
ditiAle evidence confirming re-
sponsibility for the Jews' death.
Hans Werner IC.ubitsch, 58, who
served as police captain and com-
pany leader in Warsaw during
1943, was allowed to go free be-
cause, according to West' German
law, only people- charged with
murder in the service of National
Socialism', not those charged with
complicity in such murders, may
still be tried-

Encycloyedia Judaica Called Indispensable'

JERIJSALEM (JTA) — Labor
Minister Yosef Almogi told the
Knesset that the economy was not
geared to absorb so large an in-
flux of professionals with college
degrees and predicted that finding
them employment would be one
of the major challenges of 1972.
Almogi said that 10,000 of the
70,000 immigrants expected this
year will be holders of academic
degrees in the free professions.
He noted that this category of im-
migrants numbered 17,000 over the
three years 1969-1971 and repre-
sented a 15 per cent increase to
their sector of the labor force
based on the 1968 figures.
Other sectors of the labor force
experienced a mere 3 per cent
increase over the same period,
he said.
Almogi stated that the problem

0
0

,
25, 1972-21
Friday,.Fonlary

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

0

Judge, Probate Court, Wayne County

whose exemplary efforts in behalf of

X

A

Israel, KU! Israel, • and the common
good; have earned him the highest re-
gard and warmest affection of the
Landsmanshaften Societies of Metropo-
litan Detroit, who on this occasion will
establish a Woodland of Trees in Israel
which will bear his name.

L

•000.=1.0.="43.=.0.= 1 ■000. dOpopl)

SANDER LEVIN

MAX SOSIN

OTED COMMUNITY LEADER

COMMUNAL LEADER
HUMORIST .

CANTOR
HYMAN ADLER

Congregation Waal David

CANTOR
LOUIS KLEIN

Congregation B'nai Moshe

Accompanied by Cantor Shalom Kaltb,
of Congregation 'Beth Kowa

PURIM REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

No Solicitations

Donation $1.00

Auspices of Landsmanshaften for Jewish National Fund

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