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January 28, 1972 - Image 41

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1972-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Henry and Charles:2 Noted Jews

Henry Kissinger seems to be the
man of the hour now that he is
credited with arranging the visit of
Nixon to China, and the New York
Times in an article about him em-
phasizes the secretiveness with
which he works. The Times points
out that he is constantly in the press.
There are continuous stories about
glamorous women with him, about
the plots against him, but he has
managed to mystify everyone
about what he actually has been
doing. The Times cites a former

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associate of his as saying of
Kissinger: "He's a guy who be-
lieves that if you want to get
things done, you've got to keep
them secret." The Times goes on
to say that he matches the Orien-
tals for inscrutability.
We think it's not the Oriental in
Kissinger but the Jew in him
which explains this secrecy pas-

Arson Suspected
in Newspaper Fires

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Police are
investigating the possibility that
arson may have been the cause
of a fire at the Mapam newspaper
Al Hamishmar.
The damage was slight and pub-
lication of the newspaper was un-
interrupted.
This was the third suspected
arson attempt against newspapers
here in the past few weeks.
A fire in the editorial office
of Haolam Hazeh destroyed
newspaper files and office equip-
ment. Police said they found a
stack of newspapers piled up in
the center of the office which
had been set afire.
A week later • the offices of Ha-
tzofeh, the Mizrachi newspaper,
also was gutted by fire. Police
suspected the arson was the work
of religious extremists who dis-
agreed with the newspaper's edi-
torial policies.
The fire caused extensive dam-
age to Hatzofeh's printing equip-
ment and one edition was pub-
lished in Al Hamishmar's printing
plant.

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sion. Kissinger-s father must have
been a good Jew and a good Jew
believed that there was no piet
worthwhile without secrecy. Rabb
Bunam said, "The sentence that
at all times a man should have
the fear of Heaven in secret,"
means that you should appear as
an ordinary man and be secret
in your piety. The rabbis of the
Talmud went farther and said that
he who does benevolence in secret
is greater even than Moses him-
self.
• • •
Story of a Snub
If anyone snubs you, don't just
stand there. Write a book! That
is what Charles Angoff did. He is
on his 12th novel as a result
of that snub, and he contemplates
three more volumes.

HIE DETROIT JEWISI REWS

42—Friday, January 28, 1972

Weidman's' Last Respects' Splendid
Y East Side in 1920s-
Story of N . Y.

A famous story Jerome Weidman
had written for the Jewish Publi-
cation Society about his mother
and W. Somerset Maugham (it was
reprinted in our columns in the
Aug. 6 issue) and his marvelous
book about his father, "Fourth
Street East," drew attention to the
family of the eminent novelist. We
wonder, therefore, how much of his
newest novel "Last Respects,"
(Random House) is autobiographi-
cal.
Told in the first person, this
is a most entertaining narrative
about the Prohibition era and the
years when the immigrants on the
East Side were still noticeable,
when Yiddish was spoken widely,
when the struggle for existence of
newcomers to America was a ma-
jor cause for concern.
It is the story of the years in
which the beder was an important
responsibility in a youngster's life,
when the mother's word was law,
when the neighborhood was a fac-
tor in people's lives.
Weidman's story revolves
around recollections. The death
of the narrator's mother — that
explains the book's title "Last
Respects"—was accompanied by
the difficulty of a suggested au-
topsy and then of Identifying the

the landlord would not give
the family the "apeof - isseter—the
order to move:
"Last Respects" serves magnifi-
cently and nostalgically as a re-
construction of an interesting pe-
riod in the life of immigrants in
this country. It is a reminder of
an age long gone but one well
worth recalling, and the narration
is told with great shill.

—P.S.

Our Ancestry

At a public banquet I happened
to sit next to a lady who tried to
impress me by letting me know
that one of her ancestors witness-
ed the signing of the Declaration
of Independence. I could not resist
replying; "Mine were present at
the giving of the Ten Command-
ments." —Stephen S. Wise.

It happened this way. Angoff, a
young fellow then in his early
20s, was managing editor of
the American Mercury, whose edi-
tor in chief was the great H. L.
Mencken himself, whom one might
For the finest in Musical
describe as the chief god in the
Entertainment
American literary pantheon of
those days.
One day while strolling with
AND HIS CONTINENTALS
Mencken down Fifth Ave., Angoff
remarked that the picture of the
398-3664
old woman in "The Matriarch" by
G. B. Stern, which was even then
bailed as a masterpiece, was a
J. J. CLARKE STUDIO
"snob job."
Portraiture of Distinction
Mencken disagreed and wound body in the morgue, and as the
For Your Wedding
up, "If you can do better, why storyteller traveled from hospi-
Formals - Condids - Direct Color
don't you do it?"
tal to undertaker to morgue his
3223 W. McNichols
It made Angoff kind of sore and reminiscences created the tale
Nr. Muirland
Calf 341-4141
he wrote a short story about his the: makes his new book such
old Bubbe and later that grew good reading.
into a book, and that one book has
It is the story of a domineering
fathered succeeding volumes, and woman who controlled the actions
DICK STEIN
Angoff hopes to complete the series of her husband, then those of the
Presents
in 15 volumes — a pageant of son who is one of the heroes of
THE DICK STEIN ORCHESTRA
Jewish life in the last half cen- this tale and who also follows his
AND
tury.
mother's
y dicta tes -
THE JEEP SMITH ORCHESTRA
Angoff is professor of literature
Weidman tells
control
at an eastern college, president over moonshine making by an
THE MOMH ML(AUSTER ORM
of the Poetry Society of America Italian family with whom the
Ihnnory •ecaNO win by
and author of many essays and mother of storyteller Benny
THE ORIN ROSS ORCHESTRA
poems besides the series of novels. Kramer became involved and the
U •7-2770
He is certainly" one of the two bootlegger from whom she secured
or three best writers dealing with whiskey for resale. The competi-
Jewish life in America.
tion resulted in the murder of an
So the snub got Angoff into innocent bridegroom under a
action from the novel's standpoint, canop er'sa
at a te
we
wedding thfeor
but he must have possessed a good Mrs. Kramer was supplying the
deal of something else to have whiskey.
been chosen by Mencken as the
There are all the elements of
managing editor of his magazine,
mystery and a crime story in
at so youthful an age.
"Last Respects," but more import-
ant are the interpretive elements
in a plot that takes, the reader
back
to the 1920s and shares with
By ISRAEL FRIEDLIINDER
him
all the exciting aspects of life
In "Past and Present"
on New York's East Side, the re-
Our love for Zion is one of our ligious factors, the struggles for
proudest titles. For no nation has existence, a woman's striving to
ever loved its country with such a earn enough to pay the rent so
surpassing love as the people of
Israel has loved the land of IsraeL
Though driven from Palestine
nearly two thousand years ago,
7 WEEKS IN 1SRAEL—JUNE 27-AUG.. 15
4 weeks, working and living in a Kibbutz
the Jewish people, which the
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headed, sober-minded traders, has
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loved its ancient land with an
by bulk plane, or ship.
undying love, with a romantic
love, with a love one reads of in
books of fiction, a love that ex-
pects no reward, a love that is
happy in the privilege of loving.
And yet, though expecting no re-
ward, Israel received the amplest
reward for its love. For it is this
Us At
love which has enabled the Jewish
people to survive until this day.
The love of Eretz Yisrael was
the torch that illuminated the
thorny path of our people. It was
the anchor that kept our ship from
drifting out into the boundless
ocean. And when the eternal wan-
derer seemed to sink under the
burden of his suffering, he looked
up into the sky and saw the light
that shone from Zion, and with
renewed courage he continued on
his journey.-.
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