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December 31, 1971 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-12-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

::



Demise,of Yiddish Daily 'Day' Viewed as Tragedy

Mon
- tinned from Page 1)
So 'important was the Yiddish
n e ws p a per that when William
Randolph Hearst conducted an un-
successful campaign for governor
of New York he established a daily
newspaper Of his own in Yiddish.
So vital was that press that when
Louis Marshall, the then unques-
tioned leader of American Jewry,
felt impelled to lead properly by
understanding the masses, he
learned Yiddish to be able to read
their newspapers. He was of the
Yahudim, but he studied the lan-
guage of the masses.
And whett- Marshall desired to
influence the masses, he estab-
lished, together with Zvi Maslian-
sky, -a Yiddish daily of his own.
It could not compete with For-
ward, War heit, Morgen Jornel,
or Tageblatt. But he made the at-
tempt.
The _decline of the Yiddish press
places added responsibilities upon
the gnglish-Jewish pre s S. The
Jewish weeklies published in some
60 American cities in the English
language now must assume even
greater responsibility than they
held in the past__ It is the only
communiity organ that can be read
by. parent and child, because the
Yiddish-studying - youths - are so
few! They are far fewer than the
Hebrew-reading, and in spite of
Israel, even the latter's strength
is exaggerated. The publishers of
Hadoar, •the only Hebrew language
weekly in this country, will attest
to that.
If it were not for the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency's services the
situation would have been much
worse. JTA, for 40 years, had a
Yiddish department. With the death
of the two members of its Yiddish
staff, JTA was forced, two years
ago, to abandon the Yiddish serv-
ice, and the Yiddish newspapers
found it necessary to do their own
translating of the English trans-
missions into Yiddish. But the
English-speaking communities had
access to the news as compiled by
JTA. Now JTA, contineing this
service with even greater zeal, and
the English-Jewish press represent
the main communications forces
in this country. In the interest of

MARSHALL
ROBERTS LTD.

A GENTLEMAN'S BOUTIOUE

Join the
Fashion

If lyi

well-functioning Jewish commun-
ities, _ it is vital that American
Jewry give much greater support
to both in the years aheid. They
are the mainstays in the process
of survival of Jewry as a :great
spiritual-cultural force.
*

Tog's Death Stirs
Diverse Comments

By GEORGE FRIEDMAN
JTA Staff Writer
The shock that came with the
end of the Tog (Day) created
great stir in Jewish ranks, and
there were comments from many
leaders in all walks of Jewish life.
A very knowledgeable source,
who declined to be named, was
even blunter. He told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency: "I knew the
handwriting was on the wall six
months ago. There was not any
one there who didn't know it would
happen. They didn't want to
know." As for the future of the

U.S. and Israel Agree
on Research, but El Al
Landing Rights Refused

WASHINGTON (JTA) — Israel
and American cabinet-level offi-
cials have agreed to cooperate on
numerous transportation research
projects, but Israel's renewed re-
quests for more extensive landing
rights for El Al aircraft in the
United States have been rejected.
Israeli Minister of Transporta-
tion and Communications Shimon
Peres and Secretary of Transporta-
tion John A. Volpe initialed a
memorandum of understanding by
which technicians of the two coun-
tries would cooperate on research
and exchange of information on
projects.
Volpe accepted Peres' invitation
to visit Israel at a date to be set
later.
Before departing for home,
Peres met with Sleor Browne,
chairman of the Civilian Aero-
nautics Board, on a quest begun
two years ago for El Al planes
to land in Los Angeles, Chicago
and Boston, and also to extend
El Al flights from Bucharest
to Kennedy Airport in New York,
which Israel first requested six
months ago.
Browne. however, was reported
to have responded negatively in
view of the adverse economic posi-
tion of American airlines and their
fear that granting Israeli requests
would open the door for similar
requests from other foreign air-
lines at a time of intense competi-
tion. Lebanon was understood to
have had its request turned down
last month.

Revolution,

Tog's 110 employes, the source
said: "Everything is up in the
a i r."
(The Guild represents only the
25 clerical personnel. Kaufman
said he foresaw no difficulties in
obtaining severance pay for them,
but commented: "We're not cheer-
ing.")
The demise of The Day, which
had a circulation of some 43,000,
came without any apparent warn-
ing. There was not even an an-
nouncement in the pages of its
last issue Tuesday to indicate that
it would no longer be publishing.
B. Z. Goldberg, a columnist for
the paper for 50 years, said: "Only
yesterday (Monday) the publisher
consulted me about putting more
features- into the paper. A news-
paper that is going to fold just
doesn't make plans like that."
But other sources had their
doubts. I. Kaufman, public rela-
tions chief for the Newspaper Guild
of New York, said he was "sure"
the paper's personnel knew what
was coming. He recalled that a
year or two ago, when publisher
Arthur L. Jacobs' father-in-law,
Morris Weinberg, died, Jacobs
"gave the impression that he want-
ed to give up the paper. (Because
of financial strictures, Jacobs and
the Tog's other two officers have
waived salaries -for the past seven

years.)

Publisher Jacobs has been quoted
as attributing his paper's death to
increased labor costs and reduced
revenues, and as regretting the
loss of a publication that was "all
things to all men"—Orthodox and
Conservative Jews, even-radicals.
But an ideological competitor re-
jected that reasoning. The Frei-
heit's Paul Novick contended that
the Day-Jewish Journal was the
victim of its own lack of principles.
"They didn't have any principled
basis," he told the JTA. "They
didn't have a sound base. Their
editorials, in spite of their column-
ists, were for the Indochina War."
Readers gradually resented this,
Novick charged, saying "There is
a time when chickens come to
roost."
Novick, nevertheless, termed the

SHA

Tog's closing "unfortunate, of
course." He said he regretted the
"degeneration of a paper that
started out with high hopes" and
that for years "really made its
mark in the history of the Jewish
press." Freheit City Editor Chaim
Stiller added that while the Tog's
demise was "a loss for the Jewish
press," it was the result of in-
creased disdain -for an editorial
policy reflecting "racism" and
"support of the Nixon war policy."
Philip E. Hoffman, president of

NYC Federation, Rebbe
Meet to 'Build Bridges'
NEW YORK (JTA) — An un
precedented m e e tin g between THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Rabbi Menachem N. Schneerson,
Friday, Dumber 31, 1971-5
the Lubavitcher Rebbe, and lead-
ers of the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies to discuss problems
of the Orthodox Hassidic commu-
nity, is expected to be the first
of a regular series of such meet-
ings, according to a Federation
participant at the gathering.
The meeting, which was held
at the world head quarters of the
Lubavitcher movement in Brook-
lyn, was agreed to by Rabbi
Schneerson as an effort to "build
the strongest bridges" of under-
standing between the Hasidic com-
munity and the organized Jewish
community.

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the American _ Jewish Committee,
said of the Day, "It's highly com-
petent reporting, lively and infor-
mative columns and dedication to
the welfare of Jews in the United
States and around the world will
be greatly missed. More impor-
tantly, it represented a link with
Yiddish culture, a tradition that
has bound Jews together for cen-
turies and that now is more in
danger of extinction than before."
Neal Kozodoy, executive editor
of Commentary, put the views of
many into one sentence: "As each
such institution goes under, we
are all that much the poorer."

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