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December 31, 1971 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-12-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.-
ZOD Lists Israel Summer

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

32 Friday, December 31, 1971



Brevities-

Michigan photographers are in-
vited to submit entries to the
SCARAB CLUB's second annual
ALL-MICHIGAN PHOTOGRAPHY
EXHIBITION. Cash awards will
be given in two categories, color
and black-white. There will be a
small entry fee per category. En-
try forms are available by mail
or in person by contacting the
club manager at the Scarab Club.
Entries will be accepted Jan. 3-6
and the exhibition will run from
Jan. 9-30.

O



The Michigan Chapter of the

A MERICAN SOCIETY OF

GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY AND
PSYCHODRAMA elected clinical
psychologist Henry Feinberg to
the office of president, succeeding
Dr.' Robert Drews, who continues
as consulting psychiatrist. Mrs.
Drews was elected treasurer pro

PROGRESS REPORT: The first responses to the 1972 campaign

for $550,000,000 which Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds are
seeking to meet Jewish needs at home, in Israel and other overseas
countries are beginning to come in. They are very encouraging.
The Detroit Jewish Welfare Federation—which has established

for itself the enviable record as one of the highest per capitas among
large cities every year—reports receiving 80 gifts for $5,511,000 from
contributors who gave $4,610,000 in 1971.
In Los Angeles, the Jewish Federation-Council received the first
73 pace-setting gifts " totaling about $5,500,000 from individuals who
gave $3,900,000 to the 1971 drive.
Cleveland, long one of the top communities in campaign achieve-
ments, has opened its 1972 campaign with gifts totaling $3,350,000,
from people who had given $2,900,000 in the previous year. In Miami,
the first 40 gifts brought $1.350,000 from individuals who last year
gave $615,000--better than double.
The first 50 gifts raised by the Jewish Community Council of
Essex County. in Newark, N.J., total $1,600,000 compared with
$980,000 in 1971.
The first 27 top leadership gifts announced in Boston totaled more
than $1,900,000 compared with $1,680,000 last year.
The United Federation of Pittsburgh reports that its first 20 gifts

tem, and Jonathan D. Ilyains, a
member of the board. The nonsec-
tarian organization meets the first
Wednesday of every month, at 8 brought $980.000. representing a 30 per cent increase over 1971 from
p.m., at McGregor Memorial the same individuals.
Building, Wayne State University.
Mil•Waukee, another of the communities with a high per capita
The public is invited.
giving, reports that its first 39 gifts for 1972 total more than $2.250,000.
*
compared with less than 32.000.000 last year. In Dallas, the first
gifts announced total $2,200,000 from donors who last year gave
Rubiner Gallery will feature an 240
$1,615,000.
exhibition by Detroit artist SO-
The
sentiments of givers all over the country indicate desire to
PHIE FORDON Jan. 9-30. The
more than last year even though 1971 was a year of high-
show consists of 40 oil drawings contribute
est giving in the history of American Jewish philanthropy. Among the
and collages executed by the artist first
contributors
are some who doubled their gifts for the 1972
during a six-month stay in the campaign.
town of Cuenca, Spain.
a
*
*
THE WASHINGTON CHALLENGE: Jewish communities in this
country—especially the larger ones—are now facing a challenge by
Oirtlz
a U.S. government agency. It involves only $161,256 but indicates
U.S. interest in promoting Jewish studies.
Azrzouncements
The Washington agency—known as National Endowment for the
Humanities—is giving this year an outright grant of $60,000 to the
Dec. 19—To Dr. and Mrs. Dan YIVO Institute for Jewish Research to support its Max Weinreich
Slobin, former Detroiters of Berke- Center for Advanced Jewish Studies. However, the Endowment is
ley, Calif., a son, Shem Alexander. also offering a supplemental sum of $322,512 on condition that it receive
donations, or pledges of donations, for half the additional amount, dur-
a a a
Dec. 12—To Mr. and Mrs. Martin ing the fiscal yeear which expires on June 30, 1972.
Encouraging as the Washington offer is to YIVO. it presents a
--- Ginsberg, (Carol Fishman of De-
troit) of Yonkers, a daughter, Amy major problem to YIVO's meager resources. Financially, YIVO is not
in a position to provide the required $161,256 needed to secure the
Gail.
supplemental grant from the government agency. It will have to seek
a
gifts
for this purpose from outside sources. The larger Jewish com-
Dec. 7—To Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Nichols (Susan Levy of Detroit) of munities may well be these sources, since the Washington offer repre-
sents.
in a sense, a challenge to •the Jewish community as well.
Chamblee, Ga., a daughter, Alexis
YIVO has now brought the Washington offer to the attention of
Lynne.
the Jewish Federations in Detroit, Cleveland, Baltimore and others,
a a a
Dec. 6 — To Dr. and Mrs. pointing out that it will be "a terrible shame" if it lost out over
$160.000
in federal funds—let alone the like amount in matched funds
Philip A. Levy (Denise Locke),
24030 Moritz,. Oak Park, a daugh- —because of the unresponsiveness of our own Jewish leadership. It
appealed
to the federations to participate in this joint funding pro-
ter, Erica Robin.
ject with Washington in order to strengthen a vital Jewish program.
• • •
a
a
a
Nov. 17—To Mr. and Mrs. Sey-
EYES ON COMMUNITIES: In the light of the growing number
mour Greenstein (Penny Gottlieb of courses on Jewish subjects in our colleges and universities in all
of Cleveland), 14140 Sherwood, parts of the country, the YIVO Center work of training academic
Oak Park, a daughter, Sherri personnel for American schools of higher learning certainly deserves
Tova.
the maximum financial support on the part of the Jewish communities
as well as of individual Jews. Washington recognizes the importance
of
this work. Universities have recognized the YIVO Center's academic
RABBI LEO
value by granting credits to its students in all cases where such
credit is required. Certainly, the organized Jewish communities should
GOLDMAN
enhance—and even expand—this work by generous participation in it.

Ernert Mohei

Serving Hospitals and Homes

LI 1 - 9769

LI 2-4444

REV.

SHALOM RALPH

MOHEL

LI 7-9489

RABBI
S. ZACHARIAS!
Medically Competent

MOHEL

In Home or Hospital

557-9666

Medicare Hospital Deduction Totals $68

Starting Jan. 1, the deductible of $15, for the 61st through the
under the Medicare hospital insur- 90th day.
ance program will be $68, accord-
ing to Sam F. Test, social security
district manager of the Detroit-

Northwest office.

"This means that the Medicare
patient admitted to the hospital
after Dec. 31 will be responsible
for the first $68 of the hospital
bill," Test said.

The deductible now is $60.
"The $8 increase in the deducti-
ble is the result of a review of
hospital • costs during 1970," Test
said.
Under the Medicare law, the de-
ductible must be adjusted to keep
the amount in line with the av-
erage cost of one day's stay in
the hospital.
For hospital stays of more than
60 days, Test_ said, the Medicare
patient will pay $17 a day, instead

Programs
Dr. Joel I. Hapiburger,.presicleutriiteribi`
'On the
of the Zionist Organization of De- Kfar Silver campus, -Ashkelo':
troit, -announces the 10th annual The -4Gb
fo*- - - week
ZOA Israel Summer Programs for summee4 Prfilfrani, a Camp Yehu-
1972. ..,
-
dah in Leonidas, Mich.
Applications will be - mailed to
The seven-week work-study pro-
grams will accommodate 400 par- interested students.
Partial scholarships are- being
ticipants. The following are of-
Offered by the ZOD. Students may
fered:
contact
the foal office, - 353-3636.
ZOA—Masada Teen-Age Summer
Camp, for boys and girls age 13-17.
Masada Summer Institute—for
a select group, age 15-18.
Leadership Training Course —
for age 17-20.
All programs are based at the
for your party
Kfar Silver campus, Ashkelon.
One year of study also is offered
at the Mollie Goodman Academic
High School where three new dor-

Caricatures

SAM FIELD

BARRY BATCHKO will show
some of his flat woven reliefs
and plastic constructions Jan. 3-
15 at Art in the Round, Somerset
Mall. Batchko has exhibited at

399-1320

the Detroit Art Institute and Flint
Institute of Arts and elsewhere
across the country.

.

.

'wOrkirt,7/
\f/

Norman Atlan & Cu.

Open Su nttays 11:30 to 5:00

17540 IIVIONIING • TEL 341-1330 •

Storting Nov. I I Open ovory night
Mon.-14I. :30-:
9 9 Q0
S.I. 1040-9:00

EXQUISITE KNIT' SHOP

Brings you not only

100% ACRYLIC YARN,
KNITTING' WORSTED WEIGHT

Machine washable and dryable, in white and 26 colors.

79c

4-oz. Pull-skein

and 6 other special yarns in many colors with

„toll

a uwir0

Discount
But also the newest Patterns for 1972 in all kinds of

Knitting and Crocheting ; especially NEW DESIGNS
of Dresses for the next Spring and Summer.

EXQUISITE KNIT SHOP

25294 Greenfield Road

(Greenfield Center)

the really Special-Store for Knitting and Crocheting, with own
designers, own Work-room, specialized in Blocking, Finnishing'
and all Alteration work.

NEW ORLEANS MALL

Greenfield and Ten mile

• Outsh

• ch.sm

• Efro ,. Prescmpl,ons

• Fabulous

BoL..!

• BA
• The Boor,.

• P i dr , ,,,„- ; c,„
• Bab H1:;
• P , V),,

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• "..7.c.

THE EASY-TO-SHOP MALL

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