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July 23, 1971 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-07-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Israeli Kicker
to Give LA Rams
a Definite Boost

Youth News

,r4e.

FULLERTON, Calif. — A soccer
kicker from Israel who has seen
only one college football game has
been hired by Los Angeles Ram
Coach Tommy Prothro for • next
season.
If Gideon Sherer, 27, of Tel Aviv
makes the club, he will probably
kick off to Dallas Aug. 6 in the
Rams' opener—as well as hold the
distinction as the National Foot-
ball League's first Israeli soccer
style place kicker.
Coach Prothro apparently feels
Sherer can do the job. As a
practice kicker here, Sherer has
consistently made good at 40 to
45 yards, recently reaching the
distance of 52 yards. Sherer also
has been averaging 60 to 65 yards
in kick offs—a distance which
would put the ball in the end
zone.
The Rams got wind of Sherer
through the athletic director at
Cal State Dominguez, who saw him
practicing on the athletic field at
the University of Southern Cali-
fornia. A graduate student there,
he will receive his masters degree
in August.
Sherer, a 6-foot, 180-pound vet-
eran of three years in the Israeli
Army, lives with his Israeli wife
Ruth in Hollywood.
He plans to spend the off-season,
starting in January, as a physical
therapist in a Tel Aviv hospital—
providing his services aren't need-
ed to kick off for the Rams in play-
off games. Prothro seems willing
to bet.

Ronald Efros, senior patrol lead-
er of Boy Scout Troop 23, received
the cherished "Ner Tamid," or
"Eternal Light," award last Satur-
day from Rabbi Joel Litke at Cong.
Beth Hillel.
A recent graduate of Norup Jun-
ior High. Ronald became an Eagle
Scout at the last
court of honor,
becomingthe
fourth in his fam-
ily to do so. His
father, Leonard;
older brother,
Norman; and an
uncle also are
holders of the
Eagle Award. His
grandfather Max,
has been a troop Ronald
committeeman for more than 35
years.
The second scout in Troop 23

Orthodox Youth.
Reject 'Parochialism'

Larry Freedman

647-2367

MARCIA MASSERMAN

.

......



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Tues:, Wed. & Fri. 9:30-6
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(across from Raleigh House)

C Woad Monday

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, July 23, 1971-33

* * * * * * * * ** * * _



1

' 1

Ner Tamid Medal to Ronald Efros

NEW YORK (JTA) — The Na-
tional Conference of Synagogue
Youth, America's largest Ortho-
dox youth movement, has rejected
as "contrary to Torah tradition,
parochial strategies that declare
that only certain issues are of
`Jewish' concern."
That was the burden of a reso-
lution adopted at the NCSY con-
vention and reported to its parent
Jew-
Vanity made the revolution; body, the Union of Orthodox
Congregations
of
America.
ish
liberty was only a pretext.
The movement represents 16,500
—Napoleon I.
teen-agers in 35 states and six
Canadian provinces. It called on all
segments of the Jewish community
"to join together in forging a mean-
ingful social revolution guided by
Orchestra and Entertainment
the principles of the Torah ethic,
as the only viable alternative to
the counter-culture."
According to Stan Frohlinger,
president-elect of the Orthodox
youth movement, "The Jewish com-
Candy Centerpieces
munity must not be allowed to
forget the problems of the outside
Personalized Party
world. Above and beyond the
Mementos
Torah imperative to get involved,
Invitations and Party Ac- we can best reach a generation of
alienated Jewish youth with an
cessories for all occasions.
authentic Torah message of social
concern."
Norbert Baumann, a spokesman
for the NCSY, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the UOJC
646-6138
leadership fully supported the reso-
lution.

11111.111 ■ 11 WW1. OM

BBYO
0 ' BUSINESS

who this year has been awarded
the Ner Tamid, Ronald was en-
couraged by Alfred Klunover,
chairman of the troop committee,
and worked under the guidance
of Rabbi Litke and Rabbi Moses
Lehrman of Cong. Bnai Moshe,
where the troop meets.
The requirements fulfilled by
Ronald were the study of home
and synagogue observance, the
Holy Scriptures and sacred lit-
erature and world and American
Jewry, preparation of a scrap-
book of Jewish current events;
and performance of service pro-
jects for his synagogue and re-
ligious school. He is a third-year
United Hebrew High School
student.
Ronald's parents hosted a kidush
following the ceremony for the
congregation, Troop 23 and guests.
Nathan Trager, scoutmaster, in-
vites all Jewish boys interested in
the scout program to attend a troop
meeting 7-9 p.m. Mondays at Cong.
Bnai Moshe during the summer.

The- appointment of Julius Kahn 1 * *
as Bnai Brith Youth Organization *
chairman of District Grand Lodge *
6, has been made by Sol Moss, *
Grand Lodge president. Kahn suc-
ceeds Detroiter Bernard Panush,
who served in this post for two
INVITATIONS
consecutive years. The district
By HATTIE
committee meets semi-annually to
SCHWARTZ
discuss concerns of Jewish youth
356-8563
Newest Satin S
in the Midwest.
Velour Invitations

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New ill
NORTHLAND

The annual District 6 BBYO
Summer Leadership Conference is
set for Aug. 19-27 at Camp Chi in
Wisconsin Dells. Since its inception
in 1965, this Midwestern confer-
ence has offered training oppor-
tunities for chapter leaders in the
areas of Judaism, leadership, per-
forming arts and contemporary
issues. Registration is on a first-
come, first-served basi, with all
member eligible. For information,
call BBYO, 354-6100.

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Cleveland U. Fall Term
Won't Start Yom Kippur

SAM FIRESTONE

23077 Greenfield at 9 Mile

Suite 364 Advance Bldg.
(313) 557-1880
CLEVELAND (JTA)—Reversing
an earlier decision by administra-
tors at Cleveland State University,
the school's board of trustees has
agreed to a request by the local
Jewish Community Federation to
postpone the opening of the fall
term by one day in order not to
conflict with Yom Kippur, the Jew-
at
ish Telegraphic Agency learned.
The request to change the open-
ing date from Sept. 29 to 30 was
originally denied by university ad-
Special For July
ministrators who maintained that
state universities can respond only
to state and national holidays. The
Call For Details
federation appealed the decision
to the board of trustees.
Ohio State University changed
its opening date to Sept. 30 and
the University of Cincinnati post-
352-6511
poned the beginning of registra-
tion to Sept. 24, so as not to con-
DECORATING ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE
flict with Rosh Hashana, Sept.
20-21. Kent State University add-
ed an extra day of registration
• * * • *a a.. 5 * .. . .. ..
a a a a
a s
and scheduled its starting date
*
for Sept. 30.
But two other universities in.
Ohio have thus far indicated no * *
plans to adjust openings or regis- 5,
tration dates which conflict with
the 'High Holidays. Ohio University
Department Store
in Athens is scheduled to begin
OPEN DAILY 10 A.M. TO 9 P.M.—SUNDAY 12 TO 5
registering its students on Sept. 20,
12 Mile at Telegraph
Tel Tweleve Mall
the first day of Rosh Hashana,
ALSO NORTHLAND SHOPPING CENTER
and Miami University plans to
13 Mile at Woodward
open the fall term on the second
day of the holiday.

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NOW ALL BRANDS

MAJOR DISCOUNTS

20% ABOVE SALE

Unique Furniture

out

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GIGANTIC SUMMER CLEARANCE

Football to Reign Again
at Brandeis University

WALTHAM, Mass (JTA)—Bran-
deis University, which last fielded
a varsity football team in 1959,
will compete in intercollegiate club
football beginning this fall, it was
announced by Brandeis President
Charles I. Schottland.
He said "Brandeis had many fine
teams during its nine years of var-
sity competition and both students
and alumni have voiced a great
interest in reviving the sport.
"Club football, which is con-
ducted solely by the students
under the guidance of the uni-
versity, will return the sport to
the campus and the students and
will do so at a fraction of the
cost of varsity competition."
Nicholas Rodis, chairman of the
university's department of physical
education and athletics, said two
games have been scheduled tenta-
tively for this season and more
are being sought. The Brandeis
Football Club, a student organiza-
tion which is in charge of the club
football venture, is now seeking a
part-time coach.

5 iftEl •

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OFF
OUR
REGULAR
PRICES

Positively

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ENTIRE STOCK OF

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• SUMMER DRESSES sizes 1

• GIRLS BATHING SUITS

• GIRLS PLAYSETS

to 4

2 to 14

9 Mo. to 14

Entire stock of boys', girls' and infants summer wear-
ing apparel, reduced ridiculously low for fast clear-
ance. Excellent selection to choose from and all size
ranges. Must make room for new fall merchandise.

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Use your Michigan Bankard, Astro Charge

Sorry No Layaways

sr*

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