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July 09, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
8--Friday, July 9, 1971



Study Asserts Israel Far Behind Arab Nations in U.S. Military Aid

WASHINGTON (JTA) — Israel
lags far behind the Arab countries
Acute Geriatrics Dent
as a recipient of military and eco-
I nomic aid from the United States,
First in Jerusalem,
according to figures published in
Open at Shaare Zedek the current issue of Near East
JERUSALEM — The first acute Report, publication of the Ameri-
geriatrics department in the Jeru- can-Israel Public Affairs Commit-
salem area has opened at Shaare tee here.
The periodical asserts that while
Zedek Hospital. The new unit is
designed for elderly people with Arab countries have received U.S.
acute diseases who need special- military grants of $230,000,000,
Israel received none.
ized facilities and treatment.
In addition, according to Near
With a capacity of 25 beds —
divided into rooms of one, two and East Report, Israel has gotten only
three beds each—the department about one-third the total U.S. eco-
has many special features for the nomic aid to the Arab countries
and
only
Located in the same newnd
only
one-seventh the nonmili
building are the facilities of phy- tary grants.
This year's proposed Foreign
siotherapy and occupational the-
Military Assistance Act author-
rapy. _
Prof. Yaacov Menczel, head of izes military material and train-
the department of internal medi- ing grants to Saudi Arabia and
cine, said the population of Jeru- Jordan among other Mid East
salem is today nearly three times states, but none to Israel, the re-
what it was one decade ago, and port says.
'Israel has received $500,000,-
it includes a large percentage of
elderly people, many without fami- 000 in economic and aid cred-
its for the purchase of military
lies or adequate funds.
During the past years, Shaare equipment in the U.S. this past
Zedek's department of medicine year and is presently urgently
has had some 40 beds available seeking additional credits of about
—the maximum possible under $300,000,000.

the physical limitations of the
present hospital structure. With
additional daily emergencies and
always with patients lying in
beds in the corridors, there has
been constant pressure on the
staff to release patients as soon
as possible.

Although the new Shaare Zedek
medical center, to be built opposite
Mount Herzl, will have expanded
geriatrics facilities, hospital direc-
tor David M. Meir and his staff
felt that the problem was serious
enough to warrant the construc-
tion of the new acute geriatrics
prefabricated unit adjoining the
present hospital. The unit was
built with the assistance of the
JDC Malben.
With the inauguration of the new
facilities, the most seriously ill
will not have to leave the hospital
before they are fully recuperated
as has happened in the past be-
cause of lack of physical space.
Shaare Zedek has partially al-
leviated this problem with the
institution of its Home Care Pro-
gram. For the past three years,
the hospital personnel — doctors,
nurses, physiotherapists, social
, Workers—have gone out into the
community to care for patients in
their homes.

Restoration of Sephardic .
Synagogues in Old City

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Restora-
tion work on the Sephardic syna-
gogue complex in the J e wish
quarter of the Old City will be
completed by next Passover or
Shavuot, five years after the work
began, Mayor Teddy Kollek said
Wednesday - on a press tour of the
capital.
He said the four synagogues in
the complex will reopen at that
time.
There has been an earlier re-

Near East Report's citation of
the low ratio of U.S. assistance
to Israel compared to the Arab
countries - is believed intended
to counter efforts by some sena-
tors to repeal the Jackson
Amendment to the 1971 Foreign
Military Sales Act.

The Jackson Amendment, spon-
sored by Sen. Henry M. Jackson,
Washington Democrat, gives the
President open-ended authority to
authorize military credits to Israel.
' The amendment has been crit-
icized by Sen. J. William Ful-
bright, Arkansas Democrat, who
is chairman of the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee, and most recent-
ly by Sen. Mark Hatfield, Republi-
can of Oregon.
Near East Report takes excep-
tion to what it calls recent "invi-
dious utterances" by Sen. Hat-
field comparing U.S. per capita
aid to Israel with aid to South
Vietnam. The publication charged
that Hatfield "distorts the figures
to fabricate an analogy between
Vietnam and Israel which is de-
signed to prejudice Israel's cause
in the eyes of the American peo-
ple."
The Nixon administration's de-
lay in responding to current Is-
raeli requests for more arms aid,
including more Phantom jet air-
craft, and the congressional analy-
sis and markup ,of the military
sales and foreign appropriations
bills are believed to have prompt-
ed the response by Near East Re-
port.

But while Israel received only
a fractional proportion of the
U.S. nonmilitary grants to the
Arab countries, on a nation-to-
nation basis she did not suffer
by comparison. American grants
to the Arabs were spread be-
tween 9-12 states.

Sen. Hatfield's position on the
Middle East has been hailed in a
poit that one of them, the
Yochanan Ben Zvi Synagogue, recent edition of Action, a news-
would be opened in time for I paper "dedicated to the liberation
Rosh Hashana this September. of Palestine." The paper called
The Sephardic shuls served as his stand "courageous."
the spiritual and social center
An earlier issue of Action de-
of the Jewish Quarter for 400 scribed the tribute the Federated
years, and it was from them that Organization on Arab-American
the last remnant of the Old City's Relations paid to Hatfield and his
Jewish population emerged to staff for their efforts on behalf
surrender to the Arab Legion in of "the people of Palestine."
the War of Independence.
The Action articles and other
Under the Jordanian occupation, documentation of Sen. Hatfield's
which ended in June 1967. the Mid East position have come to
synagogues' rich furnishings and the attention of the Jewish Tele-
ornamentation were destroyed or graphic Agency. They include a
looted, and the building turned into statement inserted into the Con-
a stable.
gressional Record in which Hat-
An official of the company field expressed agreement with
carrying out the restoration said the proposition that "Zionism to-
that 60 families and 300 yeshiva day is a form of aggressive nation-
students were now living in re- alism."
stored buildings in the Jewish America's Role in Mid East
Quarter, and that by next year Stressed to ZOA by Peres
there will be 300 families there,
TEL AVIV (JTA) — Israel's
half the final total.
minister of transportation and

communication, Shimon Peres, who
is said to favor a written Israeli
American friendship agreement,
said Monday night that the United
States must play a role in enabl-
ing the people of the Middle East
to negotiate their mutual problems
with each other to prevent the
region's becoming an extension of
the Brezhnev doctrine.
Speaking at the traditional
American Independence Day cele-
bration at the headquarters of the
Zionist Organization of America,
Peres declared, "We do not look
to America to save us, nor to
fight in our place. We do not seek
American dependency so as to
balance a Russian dependency (in
Egypt). But America must play
a role in this region."

unless the U.S. supports them." for the bypassing of that country
According to Rabin, the U.S. is by Vice President Agnew, who
above all concerned with assur- was visiting Saudi Arabia and
ing its own interests in the Mid Kuwait on "good will" calls.
East and did not want a situation
in which Israel's friendship was
America's only asset in the re-
gion. He said the U.S. sought a
settlement, even if it meant strip-
ping Israel of most of the ter-
ritories captured in the Six-Day
War.
The cabinet discussed Rabin's
remarks at its session Sunday and
took the unprecedented step of
announcing that it had discussed
them. This indicated that Premier
Golda Meir and Foreign Minister
Abba Eban were less than happy
with what their ambassador in
Washington had to say publicly
He explained that both the
about his host country.
U.S. and Israel faced the same
In another development, the
challenge in the Mid East and
were equally determined to re- White House denied Tuesday that
Merrillwood Mall
presidential adviser Dr. Henry A.
pel aggression there.
Birmingham
Walworth Barbour, who was Kissinger will visit Israel on his
For Appointment . . . 645-5070
hailed at the celebration for current foreign tour to make up
strengthening Israeli American
friendship in his decade as U.S.
ambassador to Israel, stressed that
the two republics agreed on the
main goal of peace, though they
differed on tactics.
He contended that despite press
reports, there has never been a
dark moment in Washington-Jeru-
SO DOES
salem relations.

QUALITY • SERVICE • PRICE

NORTHLAND FORD

LEADS THE WAY

GEORGE RUSKIN

Israelis Take Dim View
of Ne... Sisco Visit Without
U.S. Policy Changes

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Political
circles here see little chance for
success of the projected visit to
Israel by Joseph J. Sisco, the
American assistant secretary of
state for Near Eastern and South
Asian affairs, as long as the Unit-
ed States position on the Middle
East problem remains unclear and
as long as there is no change in
Egypt's position.
What Sisco has in mind, accord-
ing to the reported contents of his
recent conversation in Washing-
ton with Israeli Ambassador Itz-
hak Rabin, is to spend a week in
Israel for comprehensive talks
aimed at breaking the deadlock
over an interim solution involving
a reopening of the Suez Canal.

State Department officials con-
firmed Tuesday the possibility
of Sisco's visit later this month.

They said he would probably- not
visit other capitals in the area
and refused comment on the diplo-
matic time sequence suggested by
the New York Times Tuesday—
that Michael Sterner, Egypt coun-
try director at the State Depart-
ment, and Donald C. Bergus, chief
American diplomat in Cairo, re-
turned to Cairo Monday for talks
on the American role and Amer-
ican procedure in negotiations for
an interim settlement for reopen-
ing the Suez Canal.
The Times said that if Sterner
and Bergus reported that Egypt
was still interested in talks, Sisco
would then go to Jerusalem.

Circles here believe Sisco will
try to "sell" Israel a new State
Department policy advocating a
more extensive Israeli with-
drawal from the canal line than
was envisioned earlier. There
are also indications that the
State Department has abandon- .
ed one of the major points on
which it has been in full agree-
ment with Israel—that no Egyp-
tian troops may cross the canal,
even after an Israeli pullback.

These fears were reflected by
Ambassador Itzhak Rabin in a
taped radio interview broadcast
here last Saturday.
Premier Golda'Meir and several
cabinet ministers objected to the
interview, but not necessarily be-
cause they disputed its contents.
Rabin's interview, broadcast
over the Israeli radio for home
consumption, was sharply critical
of U.S. Middle East policies and
blasted the United Nations as "an
institution for demagoguery"
whose "decisions are meaningless

NORTHLAND FORD

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