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July 09, 1971 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jerusalem Rioting
Threat to Unified
City, Kollek Warns

JERUSALEM (JTA)—Rioting in
Jerusalem between religious
zealots protesting "Sabbath dese-
cration" and nonreligious youths
was angrily condemned by the
cabinet and Mayor Teddy Kollek
Sunday night.
The cabinet unanimously de-
nounced the disturbances after
hearing a report from Police Min-
ister Shlomo Hillel, but declined
to place blame on any quarter.
Mayor Kollek warned that con-
tinuation of the violence posed a
serious threat for the unification
of Jerusalem.
ght policemen and 10 others
y.,,...e injured, none seriously, in
Saturday night's melee which re-
sulted in the arrests of an un-
specified number of persons. Ten
were released Sunday. Others
were held for further questioning.
The rioting broke out at the
Central Bus Terminal where about
200 Orthodox demonstrators led
by Rabbi Amram Blau of the
Neturei Karat hurled rocks at
buses and cars entering the city
before the close of the Sabbath.
The zealots were confronted
by youths from the nearby
Romema • quarter armed with
stones and' sticks.
Egged Co. buses were pelted
with rocks again Sunday night on
the main road in the Mea Shearim
quarter, but no injuries or arrests
were reported. About 200 black
garbed residents of the quarter,
many of them teen-agers, set up a
road block forcing traffic to be
rerouted.
About 300 residents of the Mea
hearim quarter demonstrated
peacefully in the center of town
Tuesday night to protest alleged
"Sabbath desecration" by Egged.
They marched from their Oar-
ter behind Rabbi Blau. ,
The crowd was addressed by
Rabbi Yehezkel Halberstam, the
"Stropkove Rebbe," who denounced
the attitude of the "Zionist state"
toward religion. Some speeches
;were delivered in English.
Discipline squads among the
demonstrators maintained order,
. in contrast to the stone throwing
last Saturday and Sunday.
Mayor Kollek took a serious
view of the situation in the city
council. He told members "We
can't limit , violence. to one part
of town anymore than we can
cholera," hinting that disturbances
confined so far to the western half
. of the city could spread to East
.Jerusalem with dire consequences
lor Israel's image..

-

Investors Funding
Seven Inns in Israel

NEW YORK (JTA)—Israeli and
American investors will provide
the funds to build seven fran-
chised Holiday Inns in Israel with
construction of the first beginning
in Jerusalem next year and the
•nd in Tel Aviv in 1973.
.ne plans were announced by
Kemmons Wilson, founder and
board chairman of Holiday Inns,
Inc., of Memphis, the world's larg-
est international network of hotels
and motels.
Participants in the Israeli Holi-
day Inns franchise agreement in-
clude Israeli Inns International,
of St. Louis, Sesli Investments and
Solel Boneh, the construction co-
.operative of Histadrut.
The largest of the projected
Holiday Inns, in Jerusalem and
Tel Aviv, will have 450 rooms
and convention facilities. Israel's
first Holiday Inn, to have 120
rooms, is presently under con-
struction at Ein. Gedi on the
Dead Sea.
Other sites selected for future
Holiday Inns are Kiryat Shemona,
Neve Yam, Ramat Rahel, ,Gesher
Haziv and Lydda Airport.

t

Compensation Plan for E. Jerusalem Arabs Seen to Draw Mixed Reviews

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Israel's
proposed measure to compensate
East Jerusalem Arabs for the
property they lost when the Jew-
ish state - was established in 1948
has drawn a cautious but general-
ly favorable response from prom-
inent East Jerusalem Arabs. But
it has been assailed and de-
nounced by the nationalist press in
Beirut.
Arabs across the border de-
scribed the government bill, an-
nounced by Justice Minister
Yaacov Shapira, as a "gimmick"
designed to tighten Israel's grip
on East Jerusalem and its inhabi-
tants.
According to the Jordonian
minister of information, Adnan
Abu Udeh, who comes from
Jerusalem, the compensation
offer is a "conspiracy" aimed
at changing the citizenship of
Jerusalem Arabs from Jor-
danian to Israeli in order "to
complete the annexation of the
Holy City."
Another Palestinian spokesman

claimed in Amman that that inter-
pretation was "the only explana-
tion why compensation is offered
only to Jerusalem Arabs of all the
inhabitants of occupied Arab ter-
ritory."
Nothing in the Shapira measure
indicates that East Jerusalem .
Arabs would have to become Is-
raeli citizens in order to qualify
for compensation. East Jerusalem
Arabs retain Jordanian citizenship
but became legal residents of Is-
rael after the 1967 war and are
subject to Israeli law. Arabs in
the other occupied territories are
not considered residents of Israel
and have been allowed to retain
the Jordanian legal code.
A compensation bill passed by
the Israeli Knesset therefore could
not be applied to them.
Many East Jerusalem Arabs
expressed reservations over the
measure, mainly because they
lacked concrete details. They
said the news came as a com-
plete surprise.
Several prominent East Jeru-

salem lawyers, among them form-
er Jordanian Defense Minister
Anwar Nusseibeh, said they
needed time to study the pro-
posed legislation.
Mahmoud Abu Zuluf, editor and
publisher of the Jerusalem Arabic
daily Al Kuds, who held property
in Tel Aviv and Jaffa that is esti-
mated to be worth millions, ex-
pressed reservations about the
method of evaluating the property
and the means of payment but he
thought the bill could provide "a
partial settlement of the refugee
problem."
The measure, which Shapira has
cleared with the premier and fi-
nance minister, would obligate the
government to pay an estimated
minimum of $100,000,000 to Arab
residents of East Jerusalem for
property they held prior to 1948

ization for several African "free-
dom fighter" movements opposed
to colonialism and apartheid. The
South African government ranks
it as a terrorist organization.
The South African press de-
nounced the Israeli offer and it
was also sharply criticized in a
joint statement issued last month
by the South African Jewish
Board of Deputies and the S. A.
Zionist Federation.
Israel claimed that the offer
to the OAU was made in response
to a humanitarian appeal from the
United Nations secretary general
to aid victims of natural disasters.
Observers here believe the South
African government will shortly re-
scind its ban on fund transfers to
Israel-

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, July 9, 11971-5

NEW CADILLAC ?

in BIRMINGHAM at

S. Africa to Reconsider Ban on Fund
Transfers After Israel Re-Directs Gift

JERUSALEM (JTA)—The South
African Cabinet will meet in ex-
traordinary session next week to
consider rescinding its ban on the
transfer of funds raised for Israel,
the Israel Broadcasting Service
reported.
The ban was imposed last month
in reaction to Israel's offer of
$2,850 in food and medical sup-
plies to the Organization of African
Unity which infuriated the South
African government. It also froze
commercial transactions between
the two countries.
The IBS said it had its informa-
tion through a telephone conversa-
tion with a spokesman for the
South African Treasury in Pre-
toria. The reconsideration was
prompted by Israel's apparent
withdrawal of its offer to the OAU,
the report said.
The government announced
Sunday night that it has decided
to donate $2,850 — the sum ear-
marked for the OAU — to the
United Nations High Commis-
sioner for Refugees to be used
for the education of African
refugees.

in what is now Israeli territory.
The compensation would be in the
form of 20-year government bonds.

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The announcement recalled that
last May 18 Israel offered the OAU
medicine, blankets and foodstuffs
worth $2,850 for humanitarian
purposes in Africa but never re-
ceived a response from the or-
ganization. The wording of the
announcement implied that the
original offer no longer stands.
The OAU is an umbrella organ-

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