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April 23, 1971 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Temple Weekend Includes Tourney, Evening of Music

This Saturday and Sunday will
be 'Men's Club Weekend at Temple
Israel, but plans for the two days
of activities also include the
ladies.
The club's annual duplicate
bridge tournament and games
party is scheduled for 8 p.m. Sat-.
urday in the temple, with bridge
master Lou Cohen serving as
tournament director.
Other games, prizes and refresh-
ments are planned. Members and
their wives are admitted without
charge, while there is a nominal
cost for nonmembers.
For information, call the chair-
men, Jack Milin, 851-1242, or
Morton J. Bechek, 642-0951.
Sunday night's program, the
men's club evening with Cantor

Harold Orbach, will consist of
a formal recital of Jewish music,
beginning at 8:30 p.m.
Cantor Orb a ch will sing as
well as serve as master of
ceremonies in presenting concert
pianist David
Syme, the John
Dovaras Village
Singers and so-
prano Sheila May
Cline, one of two
women to enter
the cantorial
program at New
York's School of
Sacred Music.
Miss Cline has
Miss Cline had a wide
range of experience in performing
Jewish music, from leading roles

in Jewish operas and cantatas to
concerts of Hebrew and Yiddish
songs.
An honor graduate of Brandeis
University, she also holds a
diploma from the New England
Conservatory of Music and has
worked with such noted composers
as Paul Ben-Haim and Herbert
Fromm.
The John Dovaras Village Sing-
ers is a newly-formed professional
choral group, headed by Dovaras,
director of the Oakland University
Chorus and University Singers.
The concert will be followed by
a reception.
Admission is by ticket only;
however, tickets are available
without charge by calling the
temple office, UN 3-7769.

MONUMENT UNVEILINGS

Unveiling announcements may be in-
serted by mail or by calling The Jewish
News office, 17515 W. 9 Mile Rd., Suite
865, Southfield, Mich. 48075. Written an-
nouncements must be accompanied by
the name and address of the person
making the insertion. There is - a stand-
ing charge of $4.50 for an unveiling
notice, measuring an inch in depth.
and $8.00 for one two inches deep with
a black border.

The family of the late Sam
Kogan announces the unveiling of
a monument in his memory 1:30
p.m. Sunday, May 2, at Hebrew
Memorial Park. Rabbi L. Goldman
will officiate. Relatives and friends
are asked to attend.
*
The family of the late Joseph
Chase announces the unveiling of
a monument in his memory noon
Sunday, April 25 at Adas Shalom
Cemetery. Rabbi Donin and Can-
tor Adler will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to attend.
* * *
The family of the late Tillie
Eisenberg announces the unveiling
of a monument in her memory 11
a.m. Sunday, May 2, at Chesed
shel Emes Cemetery. Rabbi Prero
will officiate. Relatives and friends
are asked to attend.
*
*
The family of the late Calvin
Adler announces the unveiling of
a monument in his memory 11 a.m.
Sundak; M-6= 2, at Oakview Ceme-
.tellMabg=tehrman will officiate.
Relgit-rand - friends are asked
to . a ttOlitl:

Selik announces the unveiling of a
monument in her memory 2 p.m.
Sunday, May 2, at Clover Hill Me-
morial Park. Rabbi Prero will
officiate. Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

The family of the late Julius
Pitt announces the unveiling of a
monument in his memory 11 a.m.
Sunday, April 25, at Workmen's
Circle Cemetery. Relatives and
friends are asked to attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

ISIDORE
POSNER

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in his
memory 11:30 a.m. Sun-
day, May 2, at Machpelah
Cemetery. Rabbi Gruskin
will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

The Family of the Late

AARON
ALBERT

FRIEDA
LEVIN

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in his
memory 1 p.m. Sunday,
May 2, at Chased shel
Emes Cemetery. Rabbi
Kranz will officiate. Rela-
tives and friends are
asked to attend.

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in her
-;:memory noon Sunda y,
May 2, at Clover Hill Me-
-morial Park. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

-

The Family of the Late

l'he Family of the Late

LENA ZARON

of a monument in her
memory 12:30 p.m. Sun-
day, May 2, at Machpelah
Cemetery. Rabbi Gordon
will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

The Family of the Late

The family of .the late Margaret

The Family- of the Late

IDA MUSIC

Announces the unveiling

JOSEPH M.
LEFKOFSKY

BERNARD
GOURWITZ

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in his
memory 11 a.m. Sunday,
May 2, at das Shalom
Memorial Park. Rabbi Se-
gal and Cantor Fenakel
will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

-
announces the unveiling
of a monument in her
Memory 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day, April 25 at Hebrew
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Donin and Cantor Ber-
manis will officiate. Rela-
tives and -f r.i ends are
asked to attend.

announce the unveiling of
a monument in his mem-
ory 12:30 p.m. Sunday,
May 2, at Clover Hill
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Halpern will officiate.
Relatives and friends are
. asked to attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

Announces the unveiling of
a monument in her mem-
ory 10 a.m. Sunday, April
25, at Beth Tefilo
uel Cemetery. Cantor Ad•
ler will officiate. Relatives
and friends are asked to
attend.

Announces file unveiling
of a monument in her
memory noon Sunday,
May 2, at Chesed shel
Emes Cemetery. Rabbi
Prero will officiate. Rela-
tives and friends are
asked to attend.

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in his
memory 3 p.m. Sunday,
May 2, at Clover -Hill
Memorial Park. Rabbi
Rosenbaturt and Cantor
Or b a c h will officiate.
- Relatives and friends are
asked to attend.

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

The Family of the Late

BESSIE
OSTROW

FANNIE PANTER

Announces the unveiling
of a monument in her
memory 11 a.m. Sunday,
May 2, at Machpelah
Cemetery. Rabbi Arm and
Cantor Bermanis will of-
ficiate. Relatives and
friends are asked to at-
tend.

SARAH KNIGHT
(SIMONS)

CALVIN LEE
TAUB

Announces the unveiling of
a monument in his me-
mory 10:30 a.m. Sunday,
May 2, at Chesed Shel
Emes Cemetery. Rabbi
Sperka will officiate. Re-
latives and friends are
asked to attend.

JULIUS
DROZ •

MORRIS FINE

announces fhe unveiling of
a monument in his mem-
ory 1 p.m. Sunday, May
2, at Chesed shel Emes
Cemetery. Rabbi Litke will
officiate. Relatives and
friends are asked to at-
tend.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, April 23, 1971

-

35

German Parliamentary Leader
Reviews Role of Resistance
Relationships With Israel

By ESTHER ALLWEISS
Kurt Mattick, vice chairman of
foreign policy in West Germany's
Bundestag, in Detroit Saturday as
part of a five-city speaking tour,
stated that West Germany sees it-
self capable of friendship with
both Israel and the Arab nations.
Speaking through his old friend
and translator, Erich Schmidt of
New York, Mat-
tick ci ed the
ople's
Germ
:::riend-
"histor
ship" with the
Arabs, and said
that the Israeli
government both
understands and
accepts this fact.
A member of
the Social Demo-
Mattick
cratic P arty
(SPD), Mattick pointed out the
West German government has
been equally friendly with Israel,
granting the country long-term
loans and even larger-scale econ-
omic aid than is afforded the
Arabs—a bone of contention with
the latter, Mattick added.
The majority of West Germans
feel a moral obligation to Israel
and Jews, Mattick contends.
Commenting on Willie Brandt's
trip to pay respects to the War-
saw Ghetto Monument, he admit-
ted that while there had been
some criticism of the action by
refugees of German background
living throughout Eastern Eu-
rope, "the majority of (West
German) people took it as a sin-
cere gesture."
"Brandt has responsibility for
'Present Germany and the past. He
knows he can't shed responsibility

for past history, the death of Six
Million," Mattick explained.
For this reason—and contrary to
other reports—Mattick said that
the first restitution measures pass-
ed under Chancellor Adenauer
were approved by all political
parties with "very few exceptions
—no debate."
During World War II, Mattick
and Schmidt were members of the
underground political resistance to
Naism. As a Berlin leader of the
Socialist Youth Movement, Mat-
tick said, he worked with others
in an attempt to educate Germans
to the growing menace of Hitler
in the early 1930s.
His group had no specific plan
on how to defeat the one party
monopoly but hoped that should
Hitler "confront foreign power
and evoke war . . . Russia and the
West allies, and eventually Amer-
ica, would come in to overcome
aggressive Germany."
Never captured by the Nazis,
Mattick continued his resistance
activities during the war, through
his highly "mobile" position as a
car salesman. He said that "Tens
of thousands" participated in the
total political resistance between
the years 1939 and 1945.
Mattick said there were Jews
involved in his own resistance
group—and that of the several
hundred in membership, "at
least 20 per cent" were Jewish
in the years before the war.
During 1936-38, these Jews had
to leave the country for other
parts of Europe, but were able to
avoid the concentration camps,
Mattick said.
Concerning rescue of Germany's
Jews, Mattick said "there was
never any attempt (because) of
the iron-clad security the Nazis
were able to enforce. It was total
efficiency."
It was not until 1944, Mattick
said, that the resistance was able
to see a way of stopping Hitler.
Ellen Lurie, who served on New By this time, he explained, many
York City People's board of edu- more groups—church, trade union,
cation, was among the fighters for idealist and German nobility—had
local control in public education, caught on to the Nazis, and had
helping to keep the schools open banded together to plan Hitler's
during strikes in 1967 and 1968.
assassination.
The famous Von Stauffenberg
She has provided a guide for
action in "How to Change the plot of July 1944, in which a bomb
Schools — A Parents' Action was placed under a table during
Handbook on How to Fight the a chief of staff meeting and sub-
System," published as a Vintage sequently killed two persons and
paperback by Random House.
injured Hitler, was the work of a
The rights of parents, her insis- member of one of the newly organ-
tence that teachers, principals. ized nobility groups.
Mattick said that if the plan had
board members be challenged
when necessary, the manner of succeeded, their own non-Hitlerian
approach to public oficials are government would have tried to
negotiate with the Allied and the
outlined here.
"Demand a meeting with the war would have ended a year ear-
district superintendent and local lier.
school board to present your de- • Mattick, who became secre-
mands" is one of the admonitions tary of the SPD in 1946, said he
that gives an idea of the militancy was active in the fight to resist
Communist takeover of Berlin
of the Lurie stand.
after the war. Elections were
Advice is offered on stalling and
held to decide if the SPD would
buck-passing and how to fight it.
Its aggressive approach shows how become a Communist organiza-
to get good teachers. how to get tion or "retain its original char-
acter as a democratic socialist
rid of bad ones and how to insist
party, maintain alliance with the
on parents' rights.
*
West and insure the existence
of Berlin as a state of the Bun-
HiOi School Revolutionaries:
des Republic."
Views of Radical Students
The SPD has sponsored Mat-
Views of radical students, of
black students, spokesmen private tick's tour of this country, a trip
schools and women's liberation intended to explain the party's
leaders are expressed in the es- stand on West German policies
says contained in "The High and to counteract information that
School Revolutionaries" published has been disseminated here by its
as a Random House Vintage pap- chief opposition party, the Chris-
tian Democrats.
erback.
Mattick especially wants to set
Edited by Marc Libarle and Tom
Seligson. vital opinions have been the record straight on the still-
collected here to clarify the stu- awaited ratification of the Bonn-
dent attitudes and the opinions of Moscow and Bonn-Warsaw treaties
school authorities. The radical at- by West Germany's parliament.
titudes and the black opinions are He said the reason for the delay
thoroughly under review in this is the unsettled state of Berlin,
which condition West Germany
volume.
—P. S. says must be achieved before the
treaties will be ratified.
There are follies as catching' as - -Mattick• will leave th6 ITS: April
24 after speaking on university
infections .—L a Ito c h efottc auld
- —Chinese Proverb. campuses and to journalists.

Aggressive Book
on How to Change
the School System

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