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April 16, 1971 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, April 16,1971-35

Nursing Home Holds Annual Seder

Granddaddy Battle, 'Waterloo,' Now at Bloomfield Theater

Paramount Pictures' "Water-
I loo," an epic retelling of the battle
which changed the course of his-
tory, opens for a two-week engage-

the armies of four countries which
met on the farm fields of Belgium
on June 18, 1815, in the most de-
structive battle in history until
modern times. Some 52,000 men
died. The film took five years to
plan and seven years to shoot,
while the actual battle itself only
took five or six hours.
"Waterloo," filmed in Techni-
color and Panavision, is rated "G"
for all audiences.

Jonathan Purvin
to Solo at OP
Symphony Concert

Mt. Vernon Nursing Center held its second annual seder for
residents and guests April 8. Services for the 75 participating resi-
dents and 32 guests were conducted by Dr. Jack Feldman and his
sons. Vincent L. Demasi, administrator of the center, said this annual
event affords residents the opportunity to invite their families to
their home for a holiday meal. Many non-Jewish, residents partici-
pated.

Hebrew U. Computer Used to Develop
Optical Reader for the Sightless

JERUSALEM — The powerful
CDC-6400 digital computer at the
Hebrew University is being used
in the development of a low-cost
optical reader that may eventually
enable many blind people through-
out the world to read books and
printed letters from their original
forms.
Through its projected price of
about $3,500, as opposed to between
$50,000 and $1,000,000 for readers
in current use, the new optical
reader should be a feasible acquisi-
tion for many institutions for the
blind when it ultimately goes into
production.
The machine, based originally on
an idea of Zvi Weinberger, senior
physicist at the National Physical
Laboratory of Israel, being devel-
oped on the Hebrew University
campus by the Scientific Research
Foundation, an off-shoot of the
NPLI.
It is designed to be operated by
`blind people' without supervision.
Built into.:ktable, it contains a
Viindow'7.-onto which the book is
placed; as each line is read, it is
etribossed in Braille on a tape.
When the operator has finished
reading the line, the machine pro-

ceeds to the next one. At the end
of the page, the operator receives
a signal. A special circuit corrects
for tilt of the material placed onto
the machine.
A striking aspect of the opti-
cal reader will be its ability to
transcribe a variety of Latin
characters—small letters, capi-
tal letters, numbers and some
punctuation marks—in about five
different printed type faces
(fonts), giving a great flexibility
in reading material.

The Oak Park Symphony Society
announces its fourth and last con-
cert of the year, commemorating
the 25th anniversary of the city
of Oak Park, is scheduled for 8:30
p.m. April 27 at Oak Park High
School.
The orchestra, under the baton
of its conductor Jerome Rosen, will
have as guest artist the young
pianist Jonathan Purvin.
A graduate of the Juilliard School
of Music, where he received both
his bachelors and masters degrees,
Purvin was a winner of the Hous-
ton Symphony's Young Artists
Competition Awards Concert in
1969 and annual G. B. Dealey
Competition in Dallas in 1970. He
also was one of six pianists select-
ed to study with Vladimir Ash-
kenazy at the Meadowbrook School
of Music master class in piano and
was invited back this summer.
Tickets to the concert may be
purchased at J. L. Hudson Stores,
the Oak Park Community Center,
and Harrisons Violins in Berkley.

Partners Coining
to Lunar Lounge
ripPrv&

Although many books will be
suitable for use with the reader
typed material poses more prob-
lems because of the numerous
fonts available. Initially, the ma-
chine will recognize only one or
two such fonts. Unfortunately,
newspapers are beyond the scope
of the reader because of the di_ fi-
culties of poor quality paper, dif-
ferent size type faces and com-
plex layout.
The reader can be converted to
transcribe languages using non-
Latin characters, such as Hebrew,
and the approximately 6,000 blind
people in Israel may also benefit
from the machine in due course.

is'

HY HERMAN

and his Orchestra
355-5962

ROD STEIGER AS NAPOLEON

Let It Rain

ment at the Bloomfield Theater.
There are matinees every Wednes-
day, Saturday and Sunday.
A Dino De Laurentiis presenta-
tion, "Waterloo" stars Rod Steiger
as Napoleon, the emperor who lost
his empire in the course of one
day, and Christopher Plummer, as
the Duke of Wellington, whose
allied armies made Great Britain
the world's greatest power for 100
years by wining one single victory.
Sergei Bondarchuk, who direct.
ed the Soviet Union's seven-hour
production of "War and Peace,"
directed the Italian-Soviet co-
production which Dino De Laur-
entiis produced from a screen
play by H. A. L. Craig.

Orson Welles is Louis XXVIII
and Jack Hawkins, Virginia Mc-
Kenna and Dan O'Herlihy co-star
in the spectacular filmed in Italy
and Russia. Some 16,000 men of
the Russian army, including a
cavalry force of 3,000, portrayed

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HAVING A WEDDING or BAR MITZVA!

The singing trio, The Partners,
is opening in the Lunar Lounge of
the Moon Supper Club in Hazel
Park, Monday evening through
May 1. Downstairs in the Velvet
Cavern of The Moon, starting at
' classes, revolting against their the same time is Vocalist Judy
Bryte.
parental religion and practice as
Well as against the Czarist re-
gime. Russia's prisons and Siber- Vocational Training Rise
RAANANA, Israel — Dedicating
ian exile were the fate of large
numbers Of Jewish boys arid _girls, the new automation workshop
few over 17 years of age, Weis- building at Kfar Batya, the Bessie
Gotsfeld Children's Village of the
gal quoted from the letter.
Weisgal added that the research Mizrachi Women's Organization of
and . editorial project was advanc- America, M. Avigad, director of
ing so well as to augur the comple- vocational education in Israel's
tion of the entire publication by ministry- of education. stressed Is-
the centenary of President Weiz- rael's great advance in vocational
education.
mann's birth in November 1974.
"Ten years ago," he reported,
"only 11,000 students, 5 per cent
Lofy's Presenting
of the total number studying on
the post-secondary level, were in
Gladys Knight, Pips
vocational schools. Today, there
are 55,000 or 45 per cent of the
total secondary school population."

Plight of Soviet Jews Today Echoes
1903 Weizmann Report to Herzl

JERUSALEM — The destitution
and political oppression afflicting
Russian Jewry shortly after the
turn of this century are graphical-
ly depicted in a confidential report
to Theodor Herzl written by Dr.
Chaim Weizmann May 6, 1903,
which is the focus of Volume II of
the Weizmann Letters just pub-
fished in Hebrew and English edi-
tions.
Both editions were formally pre-
sented to President Zalman Shaz-
ar at his residence in Jerusalem
by Meyer W. Weisgal, chairman
of the editorial board and general
editor of the project. President
Shazar is honorary chairman of
the board.
Others present included Yaacov
Tsur, chairman of Mosad Bialik,
responsible for the Hebrew edi-
tion, members of the editorial
committee and staff and literary
editors of the local press.
Accepting the presentation,
President Shazar dwelt on the
timely appearance of the volume
when Russian Jewry was again
struggling for national libera-
tion.
Weisgal drew attention to the
famed letter in the volume in
which Weizmann, then a lecturer
in chemistry at Geneva Univer-
sity, described at first-hand his
two visits to Russia. Weisgal said
that Weizmann's report to Herzl
showed a remarkable analogy with
conditions in the Soviet Union
today. Weiimana wrote of observ-
ing a young JewiSh generation,
mostly drawn from the middle

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