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April 16, 1971 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
34—Friday, April 16, 1971

3-Day March Draws
World Participation

JERUSALEM — Almost 1,000
marchers have registered at El Al
offices throughout the world for
flights to Israel to participate in
the annual Three-Day March, open-
ing April 5, and the ninth an-
nual Hapoel Israel Sports Asso-
ciation Games, opening April 29.
Among the participants taking
part in the march are students and
youth groups from most European
countries, as well as from the U.S.,
Canada and South America.
One of the largest groups, num-
bering 62, will arrive from the U.S.
a week before the Three-Day
March to undertake voluntary field
work in border settlements.

Rrth
nnouncetnents

April 9 — To Mr. and Mrs. Carl
G. Becker (Rita Benson), 707 W.
Maple; Clawson, a son, Lauren
Elliot.

April 4 — To Mr. and Mrs. Mor-
ton Kaplan (Sylvia Gold), 25510
Gardner, Oak Park, a daughter,
Melissa Lynn.

March 31 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Melvin Nissenbaum (Anita Tell-
er), 15618 Stratford, Southfield, a
son, Paul Harvey.
*
*
*
March 31 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Douglas Brandow (Eleanor Tract-
enberg), 22546 Longacre, Farming-
ton, a daughter, Lisa Michelle.
* *
March 30—To Dr. and Mrs. Gary
Sole (Carol Derin), 29261 Point 0'
Woods, Southfield, a son, Marc
Sylvan.

March 28—TO Mr. and Mrs. Zvi
Gitelman (Marlene Cern), 2141
Medford. Ann Arbor, a son Yitz-
hak Eliahu.

4,

*

March 28 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey Hauer (Diane Kronen),
27736 Sutherland, Southfield, a
daughter, Nicole Jennifer.

March 26 — To Dr. and Mrs.
Daniel Kohen (Harriet Psigoda),
1717 Gardenia, Royal Oak, a son,
Joshua Michael.

March 26 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Harvey A. Brode (Penny Ann
Fishman), 15350 Rosemary, Oak
Park, a daughter, Heidi Lynn.
*
March 23—To Mr. and Mrs.
Stanley Hammerstein (Carol Felds-
cher), 21915 Coolidge, Oak Park,
a son, Bradley Jay.

Jewish Studies Dept.
Set Up at City College

NEW YORK (JTA) — An inde-
pendent department of Jewish
studies has been established at the
City College of New York. The
faculty council established depart-
ments of Afro-American, Puerto
Rican and Asian-American studies.
The Jewish studies department
will be an integral part of the col-
lege of liberal arts and science and
will be placed in the humanities
or social science division. The
other three ethnic departments will
form a division of their own, of-
ficials said.
This separation indicates recog-
nition of the intrinsic academic
validity of Jewish studies as well
as for their social and humanistic
values.

Amos Kollek's Novel: Sociological
Curiosities in Young Israeli's Story

Bill Creating Ombudsman
Post Adopted by Knesset

JERUSALEM (JTA)—The Knes-
set is adjourned until May 3 for
its annual Passover recess.
Before adjournment, it adopted
a measure to create an official
ombudsman to handle citizens'
complaints. i The post was as-
signed to Dr. Ernst Nebenzahl,
state controller for nearly 10
years.
Dr: Nebenzahl, who also has
served as a bank director, city
councilor and honorary consul
'general of Sweden, has a reputa-
tion for being fair and independent.
The new law provides that com-
plaints by citizens, including priso-
ners, may be made orally or in
writing. The law prohibits the
ombudsman from accepting com-
plaints against government offi-
cials.

Droosie Names Director
of Fund-Raising Efforts

PHILADELPHIA — The appoint-
ment of Eugene B. Funderburke as
director of development for Dropsie
University was announced by Dr.
Abraham I. Katsh, president of the
postgraduate institution.
Funderburke comes from New
York University, where he was de-
velopment associate for the univer-
sity's campaign. At Dropsie, he will
coordinate and supervise all fund-
raising activities, particularly for
the development of the divisions
for Hebrew and cognate learning,
education, Middle East Institute as
well as for the library and the
newly created Center for Manu-
script Research.

Preschool Project Begun
by Ferkauf Staffers

NEW YORK (JTA) — A free
preschool program for youngsters
age 3-5 where child development
specialists will teach reading,
learning and writing skills, has
been started at Yeshiva Univer-
To Mr. and Mrs. James E. sity's Ferkauf Graduate School of
Rosenfeld, (Susan Raphael), 18700 Humanities and Social Sciences.
Jamestown, Northville, an adopt-
The program, in which 20 young-
ed son, Jeremy Raphael.
sters are currently enrolled, was
made possible by a National In-
stitute of Mental Health grant to
RABBI LEO
the psychology department.
Major objectives of the school
are to bring together children of
T1-avert Mohel
widely varied economic, ethnic
Serving Hospitals and Homes
and cultural backgrounds — Jew-
LI 2-4444
LI 1-9769
ish and non-Jewish — from the
neighborhood of the school.

GOLDMAN

REV.

SHALOM RALPH

MOHEL

LI 7-9489

RABBI SHAIALL

ZACHARIASH

341-1595
MOHEL

Rev.

HERSHL ROTH

Certified Mohel

557-3186

or

557-1585

the first person, addresses the voted to a friend he loved and
audience at the political rally admired and who lost his life in
with the statement: "The young- the war. It is a moving experience,
er generation in this country does yet it is frequently marked by
not believe in the eternal Jewish childish behavior and one wonders
fate of suffering," the impres- whether Amos Kollek here seeks
sion is left that the young man to portray an arrogant young Is-
raeli attitude. It is a hardly con-
is fighting something-
ceivable characteristic, and Amos
Kollek, through his hero Assaf,
does more than taunt. He joins Kollek may not find adoration for
hands with the young extremists in his work among Israelis.
If Amos Kollek's story will be
Israel when he states in that
speech: "One gets the feeling that viewed sociologically, it may stir
our leaders, deep in their hearts, up considerable debate. Since a
do not believe in the possibility native Israeli chose English as the
of peace." The novel, therefore, language for his writings, how will
it affect feelings in Israel? Will
is sort of a challenge.
an English novel by an Israeli be
"Don't Ask Me If I Love" could
links in Jewish communal ac- be a more realistic title for an translated into Hebrew? The re-
tivities between fathers and sons. Israeli love story mingled with actions will be worth judging.
—P. S.
That is why the activities of the army experiences than one real-
Dayans are so interesting. Both izes. It is sort of a sabra reaction
A woman is always buying some-
father and son are in the public that seems to say: you mind yours,
—Ovid
thing.
eye and so are the genera l's I'll mind my own business.
wife and daughter. And that is
Amos Kollek, we learn, married
why a novel by Amos Kbllek, the
a non-Jewish girl. Assaf in the
son of Mayor Teddy Kollek of novel also marries an American
Jerusalem, assumes special sig- Christian who is enamored with
nificance.
Israel and joins her husband to
"Don't Ask Me If I Love" by live in Israel. She dies when a
Amos Kollek was published by
bomb is thrown by Arabs into a
M. Evans & Co. of New York.
supermarket. A short-lived mar-
It was written in English and
riage ends in tragedy. The at-
the young author — he is 23 —
titude of Assaf on the question
speaks quite frankly in his
of marriage is important. He did
novel about the greater opportu-
22930 EVERGREEN
not want his bride Joy to convert!
nities afforded when one writes
AI NINE MILE ROAD
Does this evince an expression of
not in Hebrew but in English.
SOUTHFIELD, MICH.
animosity to the religious in Is-
This is one of the puzzling things
354-6620
rael? There certainly is little
in this love story.
respect shown in the story for the
Young Kollek has written a good
ultra-observant elecents and at
love story. It is not lacking in
one point it is the Christian girl
sex relations and it confronts the
who chides him for his intolerance.
The Merry Melody
reader with an Israeli soldier's
Assaf speaks at one point
problems, his reactions, his at-
Day Camp
about alleged Jewish preference
titudes towards elders and the
military. It is critical and percep- for Christians out of inferiority
at 24950 Lahser, is having a Spe-
complexes. "That is why Chris-
cial Summer Rate for Pre-School
tive.
children ages 21/2 to 6 years.
It is from these collective points tain girls seem to be so sexy,"
There will be a four hour pro-
of view that a story by the son is one of his comments. This is
gram including lunch for $4.00
a viewpoint that had been heard
of one of the most prominent
per day, and a six hour program
Israelis assumes importance as in the Diaspora. It is puzzling
for $5.00 per day. They will also
much from a sociological and to read - it hi a - novel by an
have an 8 hr. day for children of
psychological viewpoint as from Israeli.
working mothers. Transportation
Perhaps Israelis will question
the literary and the narrative. It
will be 50c each _way for •.the
is much more important, in fact, Amos Kollek on the views he
summer. They may attend -tie/-
causes
his
hero
Assaf
to
express
as a study of attitudes.
three or five .da:Y.s._-, : per week.
Here is a story about a young towards the Arabs and the war
Mrs, David 1-1:41tmhail„-,
with
them:
"Fighting
the
Arabs
--
Sarah") has -planned an_excitipi:
Israeli whose family is wealthy and
program Which includes, Dancing,
prominent but who pursues an I had no interest in that . . ." Yet
Rhythrh: Band,"-Arts and Crafts,
independent life, defying parents, he was in the army, he was
Swim, Dramatics and short 'trips.
adopting an attitude of rejection seriously wounded in a confronta-
The building is air-conditidtthd,
of the father's approaches to the tion with the enemy.
and the outside area includes a
One section of the book is de-
political life in the country. In
large. sand _bOx-; boat, climbers,
fact, there is a bit of arrogance
swings,. etc.
in the youth. _
Anyone -interested in obtaining_
Is "Don't Ask Me If I Love"'
an application form or more
autobiographical? There seems
formation may - call 353-7320, or -
come
in for a personal visit. The-
to be no doubt it. The elder in
Nursery. and Kdg. are taking
ANDJ4.1S_
ORCHESTRA
the Kollek novel is interested
applications for the Fall Semes-
-
ter also.
in politics. The son submits to
968-2563;
participation in a political rally
but his speech disappoints the
father. The young man is the
extreme dove and most critical
of the government policies. We
have no way of knowing how


the young Kollek reacts to his
father's political views — Mayor
Teddy Kollek certainly is not a
hawk — yet the son seems to
have adopted a policy of need-
ling the elders. And when young
Assaf, the hero of the Kollek
novel who relates the story in

There is an established curiosity
everywhere: what happens to the
children of the great in our lives,
to the next generation: how do
sons react to the attitudes and
aspirations of their fathers, and
how often do they follow in their
footsteps?
This question has often been
asked about Zionist leaders, and
it is asked about Israelis. We know
what had happened to Theodor
Herzl and his only son. Jabotin-
sky's son became active in Israel.
Several other fathers can point
to children's activities in public
life and in the academic world. In
the main there are not too many

Chileans of Jewish Origin
Leading Agrarian Reform

SANTIAGO, Chile (ZINS)—First
steps taken by the new leftist
Chilean regime to implement its
policies have been in the area of
agrarian reform, which is proceed-
ing swiftly and intensively, accord-
ing to reports here.
One of the government officials
most concerned with the program
of confiscating large estates is
cabinet member Jacques Chanchal,
who converted to Christianity as
a youth and who now heads the
department for agrarian reform
in the new regime.
Another of Jewish origin is David
Beitelman, a militant in the Com-
munist Party, whose grandfather
was a rabbi and who occupies a
key position in the agrarian reform
department.

The Trend-Setters
of Fashion

are found at

rtnitre

NEWSF'APERS‘

St. Louis Community Eyes
New Educational Needs

ST. LOUIS (JTA) — The Jewish
community here is taking a long
look at local Jewish educational
needs and is devising programs to
"meet the needs and desires of a
new generation with new objec-
tives."
The status of Jewish education
and the need for change was dis-
cussed at length in a symposium
on Jewish education sponsored by
the Conference of Jewish Organ-
izations.
Louis I. Zorensky, president of
the Jewish Federation, said it was
with the adaptation of the Jewish
school system in mind that the
newest federation agency, the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Education,
was founded with Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reform Jews work-
ing together to provide quality
education for Jewish youths.

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