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April 16, 1971 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

30.-Friday, April 16, 1971

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

TV Stations Expend Great Effort
to Present Two Passover Specials

Two television stations threw a
lot of heart into special drama
presentations revolving around
Passover Sunday afternoon.
A mobile crew from WWJ-
TV (Channel 4) took the script
of Wayne State University
coed Lois Clamage to a suburban
Jewish home to provide an effec-
tive backdrop for "Some Speak
. . . Some Are Silent." For the
other special, "Passover in a Vil-
lage," WXYZ-TV (Channel 7)
cheated a shtetl setting and cos-
tuming for Sholem Aleichem's folk
tale, adapted by another WSU
student, Michael Parnos.
Certainly, for providing a show-
case to young talent, both of the
stations are to be commended.
Evelyn Orbach, program asso-
ciate for the Jewish Community
Council, staged and produced the
specials for the Council.
"Some Speak" focused on a
contemporary family, torn as
much by the self pity of its in-
dividual members as by the issue
that emphasizes the gap in gen-
erations: the war in Southeast
Asia. ,
Nothing is resolved by the
drama, which takes place on the
eve of the Passover. A father
viewing it comes away sympath-
izing with the father, who remem-
bers other wars when a man
fought because it was "right" to
fight. A son viewing it sympathizes
with the unseen son, who has fled
what he feels to be un unjust war
by going to Canada.
The daughter, portrayed with
sensitivity by Abby Moran. re-
mains unchanged—feeling injus-

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MUSIC

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VOTE

SHAYNE

OAK PARK MAYOR
MONDAY

tices, yet doing nothing to
alter them. If it is the role of
the young to call attention to
wrongs, so be it. But to withdraw,
because the "system" is too tough
to fight, is also a wrong.
Referring to this as a Passover
play is stretching the imagination
a bit. However, it is one of the
more thought-provoking produc-
tions to emerge on local television
for some time. Although tedium
set in toward the end, and some
of the camera work was sloppy,
on balance it was a meritorious
presentation.
"Passover in a Village" re-
called an aspect of East Eu-
ropean Jewish history that is
not so easy to forget: the blood
libel. The little world of Nach-
man the Jew may be too far
from America for any but the
Jewish viewer to fully appre-
ciate but, if it pricks a con-
science or two, well and good.
This was not as effective a pro-
duction as "Some Speak," and
the impact of the story line was
lost in less-than-ideal acting.
Nevertheless, it is a well-de-
served tribute to Mrs. Orbach that
two stations would agree to turn
over prime Easter Sunday view-
ing time to two Passover specials.
—C.D.

Dern State Central
OKs Resolution on
Soviet Minorities

The Democratic State Central
Committee, meeting recently in
Lansing, approved by voice vote
a resolution on Soviet Jewry and
other minorities of the USSR,
which was not acted upon at the
earlier party convention.
The resolution, originally in sup-
port solely of Soviet Jewry, had
been amended to include other
minorities to gain acceptance by
the resolutions committee.
As amended, it referred to the
persecution of "Soviet Jewry and
millions of non-Russian nationals,
such as Ukrainians, Latvians,
Lithuanians, Georgians and others."
It called upon the President to
"demand of the Soviet government
. . . that it abandon its current
wave of mass arrests and secret
trials, release the prisoners being
held as a consequence of these
arrests, and permit those seeking
permission to emigrate, to do so
freely without persecution, repres-
sion or reprisals."

The Wayne State University
Symphony Orchestra under con-
ductor Morris Hochberg, will pre-
sent "A Concerto Night," with
WSU music students as soloists,
8:30 p.m., Thursday at Community
Arts Auditorium. The public is
invited at no charge.

gewry

(.9n tie

sr

This Week's Radio and
Television Programs

ETERNAL LIGHT
Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WWJ
Feature: "A Conversation With
Roberta Peters." Commentator
Martin Bookspan will interview
the noted opera singer on her re-
cent recital tour of Israel.
*
*
HEAR OUR VOICE
Time: 11:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WCAR
Feature: The music of Soviet
cantor Mikhail Alexandrovitch con-
tinues. Alexandrovitch, a child
prodigy, today ranks as one of the
leading concert artists in his coun-
try. Series host, Cantor Harold
Orbach, will comment on the ren-
ditions heard.

BNAI SHALOM
Time: 10 p.m. Sunday
Station: WBRB-FM (102.7)
Feature: Phil Blazer's weekly
nationally-syndicated program pro-
vides a contemporary outlet for a
potpourri of Jewish culture, hu-
mor, music and literature.

IN CONTACT
Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WJR
Feature: Hal Youngblood, with
religious and moral figures, hosts
the weekly program whose pre-
mise is to place religion and man
in contact.

JWV

SOL YETZ - MORRIS COHEN
POST and AUXILIARY will meet
8:30 p.m. Monday at the JWV head-
quarters. The post will act as hosts.
Post officers re-elected for 1971-72
are: Raymond Weiss, commander;
Phil Shapiro, senior vice command-
er; Morley Wolfe, junior vice com-
mander; Harry Hoffman, judge
advocate; Charles Glass, adjutant;
Louis Goodman, quartermaster;
and Seymour Shulman, chaplain.
The post and auxiliary are plan-
ning an installation of officers.
Freda Horowitz, child welfare
chairman, plans a party at the
Juvenile Detention Home. Mem-
bers are asked to bring jewelry
and trinkets.

Cystic Fibrosis Benefit
Planned by Bale Unit

Complete Selection including the
Finest 14 Kt. Gold Jewelry

See Morris or Joel Watnick

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283 Hamilton

GIFTS

644-7626

..Birmingham (Near Dumery's) Thurs., Fri. to f p.m.

Leonard J. Fein, director of the
Hornstein Program for Jewish
Communal Service at Brandeis
University, will open the annual

HIGHLIGHTS
Time: 9:45 a.m. Sunday
Station: Channel 2
Feature: "New Sounds in Jewish
Music." Cantor Harold Orbach of
Temple Israel will host the new
music series. With him will be the
Temple Israel High School Chora-
liers, along with instrumentalists
on the guitar, drums and piano.
The program is produced by Eve-
lyn Orbach of the Jewish Com-
munity Council of Metropolitan
Detroit.

JOSEPH L. BALE AUXILIARY
will hold elections and a cham-
p a g n e celebration 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the home of Mrs.
Harold Levin, 26890 Meadowlark,
Southfield.

A GIFT FOR EVERY OCCASION !

Dr. Leonard Fein to Open
Midrasha Lecture Series

Joseph Bale Auxiliary Jewish
War Veterans, will sponsor its
second annual cystic fibrosis sum-
mer camp benefit 8:30 p.m. April
26 at the Fisher Theater. Anthony
Newly and Buddy Hackett will be
featured entertainers. For infor-
mation and reserved-seat tickets,
call the JWV headquarters, 255-
4743.

will be Lewis S. Grossman, Man-
dell L. Berman, George M. Zeltzer
and Dr. Benjamin L. Yapko.
Fein is associate professor of
politics and social policy at the
Florence Heller School for Ad-
vanced Graduate Studies in Social
Welfare at Brandeis. Before join-
ing the Brandeis faculty, he was
associate director and director of
research at the MIT-Harvard Joint
Center for Urban Studies.
His books include "Israel: Poli-
tics and People," published in 1968.

Lansing Bond Dinner
to Feature Emil Cohen

The Jewish community of Lans-
ing, East Lansing and surrounding
areas will celebrate the 23rd anni-
versary of the founding of the state
of Israel at a dinner 7:30 p.m.
May 1 at Cong. Shaarey Zedek,
DR. LEONARD J. FEIN
East Lansing.
Midrasha Institute 8:15 p.m. April
George M. Kessler, chairman for
28 at the Louis and Esther LaMed State of Israel Bonds in Lansing,
Auditorium of the United Hebrew said the affair will be sponsored
Schools.
by the Greater Lansing Bond com-
Dr. Fein's topic "Jewish Iden- mittee.
tity," will introduce the theme for
Entertainer Emil Cohen will head
the four-part series on "The Amer- the program.
ican Jewish Community."
For reservations, contact co-
The other speakers in the 15th chairman Kurt Gorwitz, 227 Gate-
wood, Lansing, 372-6174.
annual Bargman Memorial Lec-
tures are Dr. Daniel J. Elazar,
professor of political science at
the Center for the Study of Fed-
eralism at Temple University,
May 6; and Dr. Mervin Verbit,
Orchestra and Entertainment
associate professor of sociology
at Brooklyn College, May 13.
On May 18, Dr. Joseph Fauman,
professor of sociology at Eastern
Michigan University, will moderate
and participate in a review and
Portraits by
analysis of the previous lectures.
Chairmen of the four sessions

Larry Freedman

647-2367

Business
Briefs

BRENDA'S BEAUTY SALON
24691 Coolidge, is presenting every
Tuesday and Wednesday, a free
rinse with every $3.50 set. Bren-
da's is open evenings and Sundays.

as always fine
quality photography
Merrillwood Bldg. Mall
Birmingham
251 Merrill, cor. Woodward
647-5730

CREATIONS BY POLLACK'S,
24123 Greenfield, featuring cus-
tom-made draperies, is still offer-
ing free traverse rods this month
to their customers. Pollack's can
be conveniently reached at. 557-
7744 or evenings, 557-6492.

Respecting Mankind
Who does respect and honor
find?
Who honors and respects man-
kind.
—Talmud

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Men's Clubs

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