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March 05, 1971 - Image 27

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Musical Event to Benefit Children

"A Morning of
Music" will be
presented by the

Women's Auxili-
ary of Children's
Hospital at an
open rehearsal
with the Detroit
Symphony Or-
chestra, 10 a.m.
March 31 at Ford
Auditorium. Vio-
linist Isaac Stern
will be soloist. The benefit, which will help purchase a 520,000 heart-
lung machine and support the auxiliary's poison prevention program,
is under the honorary chairmanship of Mrs. Lynn Townsend (left).
Other active participants in the auxiliary event are (from left) Mrs.
Isadore Winkelman, Mrs. Boyd Turner and Mrs. Avern Cohn.

Yeshiva Maps
Science Fair

Hillel Official Cites Spiritual Probing
of Youth and Fears Loss of Tradition

NEW YORK (JTA) — A lead-
ing Hillel official has expieised
concern that some of the forms of
innovative worship developed and
used by young Jews may be relig-
iously inauthentic, un-Jewish and
lead to a new sectarianism.

Informal Jewish Studies
Set Up at Rochester U.

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (JTA) — A
group of Jewish students, under
sponsorship of the Hillel Founda-
tion of Rochester University, has
— started a Free School of Jewish
Studies at the university, a 13-
course curriculum drawn up in re-
sponse to student indications of
interest in such studies.
When the students found they
could not get quick action from the
university administration for such
a program, they began to seek out
faculty members and other sources
of help to organize their own
courses.
Robert Ganz, the student co-
ordinator, said that because the
courses were noncredit, "we are
free from the procedures and
standards" of the university ad-
ministration. Accordingly, he
said, the free school can offer
courses meeting only a few
times during the semester, need
not hold examinations and can
"work at a pace that the stu-
dents and their teacher set up
themselves."
He said there was no charge for
the courses and that each class
would decide on academic stand-
ards and requirements for the
class members.

Cantors-to-Be Sought

NEW YORK — The Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion School of Sacred Music
announces a conference for young
men and women interested in the
cantorate as a career will be held
at the college-institute here 2 p.m.
March 28.
The program of training leads
to a professional diploma as can-
tor and the bachelor of sacred
music degree.

Spotlight on Vice, Drugs

Jewish Center Single Adults will
hear a talk by Police Sgt. Frank
Kirschner on "Vice, Prostitution
and Drugs" 8:30 p.m. March 16 at
the Jewish Center.

Sen. Cooper Introduces
Safety, Schooling Bills

State Sen. Daniel S. Cooper
(D-Oak Park) has introduced leg-
islation requiring automobile manu
facturers to equip automobiles
with bumpers able to withstand
either a front or rear 5-mile-an-
hour crash without sustaining
damage.
Cooper stated that at least one
major insurance company has
widely advertised its willingness

to reduce collision insurance - rates
by 20 per cent on cars capable of
withstanding such a crash.
Sen. Cooper also has Indicated
he introduced legislation making
special education programs man-
datory throughout the Asti-to-Iwo-
vide for the education of plipaissl:
ly . 111044CIPPd 444141:01 ■ --7‘..W4>y

Those fears were expressed by
Dr. Alfred Jospe, director of plan-
ning and programing for the
Bnai Brith Hillel Foundation. He
spelled out his views in an article
in the current issue of the Journal
of the Central Conference of Am-
erican Rabbis, the Reform rabbini-
cal association of which he is a
member.
Citing evidence that "a new re-
ligious intensity" was developing
among American youth, including
Jewish youth, Dr. Jospe declared
that this approach "rejects the
standard forms of worship and re-
ligious expression." It does seem,
he said, "to reflect a genuine re-
ligious quest and, in some in-
stances, actually possesses all of
the elements of a religion which
go with the counter-culture that
has developed among a substantial
segment of the nation's youth."
Some experiments, he report-
ed, involve a multi-media ap-
proach. Others involve experi-
ments with jazz music and
masses; calls to worship accom-
panied by a guitar; dancing on
the pulpit; sitting in concentric
circles on the floor; long periods
of silent meditation; prayers
taken from newspaper headlines,
or reflecting on them; and chang-
ing light effects.
Some observers and many par-
ticipants, he added, "feel that the
rejection of the conventional form
and symbols of religion does not
imply rejection of religious faith
itself but simply constitutes a
search for new ways of expressing
it more meaningfully."

High School Program
to Bring 100 to Israel

NEW YORK (JTA)—A secondary
school program in Israel for nearly
100 American 10th and 11th grade
students will be held during the
1971-72 academic year at two
kibutzim in the Galilee area, it
was announced by Dr. Emanuel
Rackman, chairman of the ad-
visory committee of the American
section of the education and cul-
ture department of the Jewish
Agency.
The participating collectives will
be the Huleh Valley regionil high
school at Kfar Blum and the Kvut-
zat Shaal at Karmiel, he said.
Kfar Blum, a farm collective,
will be open to 10th graders.
KvutIat Shaal; an urban kibutz,
will be open to 11th graders. Dr.
Rackman added both schools are
fully accredited by American high
schools, so returning students can
get credits toward their high school
degrees at home_
Rabbi Rackman said that the
next academic year will mark

Friday, March S, 1971-27

THE DETROIT • JEWISH NEWS

Men who are governed by rea-
son . . . desire for themselves
nothing which they do not also
WALTHAM, -Mass.—Selected stu- desire for the rest of mankind.—
Yeshivath Beth Yehuda will pre- dents from colleges in the greater Benedict Spinoza.
sent its annual Science Fair 2:30- Boston area are being given the
6 p.m. Sunday at the Yeshiva chance to "try out" research
building.
chemistry fulltime at Brandeis
More than 100 exhibits will be University during the summer pre-
featured in junior and senior divi- ceding the senior year.
.
The Brandeis chemistry depart-
L.0,nf red .r• I h.
sions. Mathematics, engineering,
.•
psysiology and chemistry are the ment, with funds from the Nation- • AWELRY AND wt:'
,,
ON
PRE
Ma,F
al
Science
Foundation,
offers
six
fields represented.
science-minded
college
juniors
an
I
Bercnbon
An integral part of the Yeshiva
science curriculum, the science opportunity to participate each
fair provides students with the op- year in faculty research projects
portunity to apply concepts pre- under the NSF's "Undergraduate 210 S. Woodward, Birmingham
Research Participation Program."
sented in their classroom work.
Until last year, winners of the
school fair advanced to regional
fairs and then to Cobo Hall. But
this year, much like last, students
submitted abstracts to the Engi-
neering Society, which together
with the Detroit News co-sponsors
at
the metropolitan citywide science
fairs.
Based on these abstracts and
on the advice of the school fair
Call for details
judges, students from the Yeshi-
va science fair will compete in
the district fair in Cranbrook
school, Bloomfield Hills.
352-6511
Ezra Roberg, Yeshiva science
department chairman, said the ex-
DECORATING ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE
cellence of the exhibits is enhanc-
ed by the fact that the students
have a concentrated Hebrew
studies program. In other years,
his students have received special
recognition for their entries, Ro-
GREEN- 8
I.
GREEN-8
berg said.

Brandeis Chemistry Dept.
to Take On Young Interns

CONTINENTAL WATCH
& JEWELRY SHOP

Why .Pay More?

NOW ALL BRANDS

MAJOR- DISCOUNTS

Unique- Furniture

They Made
the Grade

LESLIE TRAGER, a scholarship
student at the Detroit Community
Music School, will solo at a school
concert 3 p.m. Sunday in the De-
troit Institute of Arts lecture hall.
The program, free to the public,
is sponsored by the Music Per-
formance Trust Fund under -a.
grant to members of the National
Guild of Community Music Schools.
Leslie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Trager of Rensselaer St., Oak
Park, is in the eighth grade at
Lincoln Junior High School and
is assistant concertmaster of the
Detroit Symphony Youth Orches-
tra. He will perform the Faure
"Berceuse."

Five students at Oak Park High
School were invited to participate
in the recent Annual Border Cities
Conference sponsored by the De-
troit Round Table at the Rackham
Building. They were Eddie Brad-
ford, Marla Chadwick, Marc Fish-
man, Frances Rayford and Jeff
Sacks. Frances was one of the two
student participants in the central
panel discussion, "What Are the
Sources of Our Values? How Do We
Put Our Principles Into Practice?"
* * *
Miss Janis Rosner, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack M. Rosner of
Stratford P1., Oak Park, has been
awarded a $500 scholarship by the
Michigan State Federation of Wom-
en's Clubs to attend Interlochen
Camp in the art division, for eight
weeks this summer. There were
four such awards in the state' of
Michigan. Janis, who will graduate
from Berkley High School in
June, was also the recipient of a
merit certificate in the high schooL
division of the National ,Scholastic
Art Competition held in February.

ONLY j

am*

'

OPEN SUNDAY 9 A.M. TO 6 P .M.

DESIGNER
ORIGINAL
SAMPLE
SALE!

ALL WITH LABELS
MOSTLY
ONE-OF-KIND

SUNDAY
ONLY!

a

$58

0

ONCE in a decade sale
of a I most all original
dresses, costumes and
pant sets by f a m o u s-
-Makers designed to sell
for $120 to $265. ALL
SIZE 10's!

SAMPLE SHOWN:
3-Pc. pant set with
pure wool coat.
Made to sell for
$265.

V '4

mt.

SUNDAY
ONLY!

the fifth anniversary of the
American-Israel secondary school
program, but the first year in
which an urban kibutz will be
Included.

ONLY

SUBURBAN

G '

r

$58

Both collectives have large num-

heti of Americans' as members,
which helps in the .integration of
the American students with the
Israeli students. he added. Dr.
Rackman also reported that the
general courses at the kibutz
"schools are taught in English and

Ste Jadeite courses taught in

OrliA,..rOcit as Pems 0110--

Juliet
GREEN-8 CENTER

SAFEST
PeNizsT_

WINNER. AAA TRAFFIC

Greeetleidil Me leads

Sunday
9 am. to
6 p.m.

CHARGE rr
Security,
Juliet,
Bank-
Ainerleard

ay

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