100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 29, 1971 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1971-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

34—Friday, January 29, 1971

Boris Smolar's

'Between You
and Me'

...

,

-....



Editor-in-Chief Emeritus, JTA
(Copyright 1971, JTA Inc.)

JEWISH BRAIN TRUST: A group of about 100 Jewish thinkers,
academicians, professionals and lay leaders—each an outstanding
authority in his field—has been assembled by the American Jewish
Committee to look into complex problems which the Jewish community
in the United States may face in the '70s.

The group is the largest Jewish "brain trust" ever engaged in
assessing the broad trends in society as they may affect Jewish life
in this country. It is divided into three separate task forces: the Task
Force on the Future of .the Jewish Community in America, the Task
Force on Group Life in America, and the Task Force on the World
of the '70s dealing with, international affairs.
The task forces' mission is
i to bring new thinking and creative
approaches to bear on the solution of problems which affect the
Jewish community. Position papers will be presented at working con-
ferences of each of the three groups. Following a series of such con-
ferences and of elaborate discussions, the three task forces will come
up—each in its sphere of concentration—with a set of policy, program
and strategy recommendations which would assist the AJC in charting
its course of action in the '70s.
It is hoped that the recommendations would be applicable not only
to the American Jewish Committee but to the Jewish community
generally. The recommendations will be widely disseminated with a
view to opening new and important avenues of thinking for all interested
in Jewish continuity in this country. They may also serve to form a
basis for communitr-wide planning.

JEWISH PRIORITIES: The Task Force on the Future of the
Jewish Community in America will have as its major objective the
examination of those factors that are threatening Jewish continuity
and survival as well as those that encourage Jewish identity and
cohesion in America.
Philip E. Hoffman and Bertram H. Gold, president and executive
vice president of the American Jewish Committee, respectively, consider
the formation of the task forces a great achievement. They believe
that the more than 35 participants in the Task Force on the Future of
the Jewish Comm'unity—which is already functioning under the chair-
manship of Louis Stern, the prominent national Jewish communal
leader—will be able to make recommendations in institutional struc-
tures, priorities and programs for the strengthening of Jewish com-
munal life.
The general purpose of this particular task force is the identifica-
tion and the examination of institutions, tendencies, programs that
determine the character of Jewish culture and identity. The recom-
mendations which this task force will develop for action will not be
designed as directives for any particular Jewish organization but as
the agenda for the American Jewish , community in the next decade.

The roster of the members of the Task Force on the Future of the
Jewish Community in America contains most impressive names of
Jewish leaders, professors, social workers and rabbis. A number of
position papers, already presented at the first conference of the task
force, throw light on the problems which will undergo study and exami-
nation. They include youthful turmoil and action on the part of the
Jewish community, identity and affiliation of American Jews, Israel
in the mind of American Jews, allocation of Jewish communal re-
sources, Jewish education in the United States, the synagogue in
America. Among the papers presented is also a "demographic profile"
of American Jewry today.
The aims of the task force are to analyze the major social trends
within the Jewish community, to examine the present effort of the
organized Jewish community to support or to develop institutions and
resources which determine Jewish continunity in America, and to estab-
lish what can and ought to be done by Jewish institutions in shaping
desirable patterns for Jewish life in this country.
The Task Force on the World of the '70s is composed of distinguished
personalities prominent as experts in world affairs. It will deal with
problems in the international field, problems concerning Israel
and the Jews in Communist countries in Eastern Europe, democratic
countries in Western Europe and in Latin America. Professor William
Haber is chairman of this task force.

ET'S A FACT

More than 60,00D Jews dote
been waded from North Africa
and Eastern Europe since 19€1. The 413C
has spent $4 million resettling tton.

Soviet Anti-Jewish Moves Indicate
Real Attitude, Publi slier Springer Says

BERLIN — The fact that Soviet
Jews are refused the right to
travel, that they have been sen-
tenced for attempting to escape
and that the state of Israel is en-
dangered with the help of Russian
rockets and Soviet diplomats, is
more indicative of the true nature
of the Russians than the illusion
that real bridges can be built be-
tween the West and the East, it
was cautioned by Axel Springer,
leading German publisher in Die
Welt newspaper.
In spelling out- the dangers in
the arrangements being made by
Chancellor Willy, Brandt with the
Soviet government and its satellite
Eastern governments, S pr in g e r
names recent uprisings in- Poland,
the inconclusive results of the
ambassadorial talks on the future
of Berlin and other disappoint.
ments as further evidence that the
Soviet Union "is a power which
desires the political death of the
Federal Republic of Germany."

He further cautions that be-
cause of the natural desire for
reconciliation with the peoples of
the East, false hope is being
built up that this will come about
through the present "policy of
appeasement." He goes on to shy
that while all attempts at con-
tacts are justified, they should
not be overloaded with impos-
sible hopes.

The Soviets and their satellites,
he concludes, can be judged best
by their deeds, not by their pro-
mises.
"German ears most of all should
have burned when the cry for help
rang out for resistance to the
trials of Russian Jews whose only
crime was attempted escape in
despair at an inhuman ban on their
emigration. What has happened
and is happening compels all poli-
tically-minded Germans to take a
stand, to maintain morale and to
examine whether under these con-
ditions a policy of understanding,
adjustment, of appeasement can
be possible, or even just, with the
gov6rnments responsible."
The Axel Springer publishing

Israel to Host Parley
of Computer Experts

JERUSALEM—Computer experts
from throughout the world will
meet here Aug. 16-20 to find ways
to help developing nations.
The Jerusalem Conference on
Information Technology will be
held with full support from the
Israel government and an inter-
national program committee- of
leading computer professionals
representing every continent.
Heading the committee is Prof.
Gerald Estrin of the University of
California, Los Angeles, a leader
in advanced computer design. He
noted that Israel's young computer
industry has already earned an in-
fluential place in the world of in-
formation technology and is gain-
ing a reputation for advanced re
search, practical application and
transfer of lmowhow in computing.
The conference, its sponsors
hope, will help spread this reputa-
tion, and they see Israel's com-
puter capability as an important
future means of commercial earn-
ings and influence abroad.

group is one of the largest in Wes-
tern Europe. It publishes five daily
newspapers, two Sunday news-
papers, several magazines and
controls a large book publishing
house.

YOUR CANDID CCLOL

For All
Occasions

ALBUM

WILL BE

FINER

, Eti PHOTO:AAP Hi.

BIG BMW or
SMALL COMBOS

WINER

.,ND ASSOCI:,TE,

KE

642-5520

1 8196

FURNITURE & UPHOLSTERING

CUSTOM MADE FURNITURE—DRAPERIES
INTERIOR DECORATING

273-1863

15335 W. 7 MILE

Cf•.war)314+0

To my dear relatives and friends:

c971anh

YOU

Your thoughtfulness & kind wishes for speedy recovery
daring my recent hospitalization, is greatly appreciated. It
all helped in hastening my recuperation.

Thelma (Davis) Levenstein

SPECIAL GROUP RATES (5 ROOMS OR MORE)

RAVING A WEDDING or BAR MITIVAl

REGISTER YOUR OUT-Of-TOWN GUESTS AT THE •BEAUTIFUL

EMBASSY MOTEL

Ideally Located Ve Mile From Itertilaad
COLOR TV -Heated Pool - Hi-Fl-Restaertart

SAUNA, INDOOR

POOL, WHIRLPOOL, ETC-

(mama. next door at minimum char,• $1 per vb.)
Airport Tramp:6~3os Available
Bea Helper., crovrwaer

14380 W. 8 MILE, OAK PARK

548-8877

GIRLS' & BOYS'

JACKETS & COATS
20% to 50% OFF

SPECIAL GROUP

BOYS' & YOUNG MEN'S PANTS

Y2 OFF

bilo orsTOTS-NYtarf
ni .
EN ° SIN
LI 3-4115

13745 W. NINE MILE RD.

THE BIG TICKET ITEMS
FOR LESS !

Japanese Farmers
Study Kibuizim.

'tur attribution of
$100 to the UJA would
pi the cost of
ttaching lilltorsb3
foristait how
tO rent

TEL AVIV, (JTA)—Forty young
Japanese men and women have
completed a two-week seminar 911
cooperatives at the Afro-Asian in-
Mute here and will go to work in
four Israeli kibutzim.
This was the ninth seminar con-
ducted by the Institute for Japan-
ese groups, who come to Israel
every year under the auspices of
the Japan Kibuts Movement.
The kibutz movement in Japan
is comprised of some 30 kibutzim,
in part prompted by a shortage 01
land. The Japanese students said
Israel's kibutzim can offer some
solutions to satisfy their 'longing
for social change.



Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan