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December 25, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-12-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Heroism During Holocaust Related

(Continued from Page 8)
on to work camps. Despite her ef-
tians, Ruch Oporu. She said the forts to keep the children with her
movement's cardinal rule through- (To make them look younger, and
out the entire occupation was: If consequently ineligible for work
you are given a child to save, you camps, she would tell them to
must save that life even at the stoop over), only 12 children were
cost of your own.
left when the Allies arrived.
Later, as a prisoner in Ausch-
Her work did not end with the
witz, she would apply that prin- war; she immediately set about
ciple many times.
organizing a soldiers' home for re-
Mrs. Ciesielska isn't certain how turning men, and to this day en-
she and her husband were caught, gages in a number of humanitarian
but in spring 1942 her counterfeit projects.
work came to a close.
Mrs. Ciesielska isn't certain how
Early one morning, the Gestapo her name came before the Yad
arrived at her office-apartment in Vashem officials, but early in 1967
Krakow. She managed to hide the she was invited to Israel to accept
photographs of two Jews whose the medal of the Righteous Among
false identification papers were the Gentiles and to witness the
being prepared; however, two planting of a tree in her and her
others who had come to the Cies- husband's name, on the., Yad
ielskis for aid were not so lucky. Vashem avenue.
They were taken away, and the
As a guest of the government,
Gestapo settled down to wait for she was escorted throughout Is-
more.
rael, including the soldiers' home
No other Jews arrived that day, that is a counterpart of the one
but the Ciesielskis were already she had organized in Poland.
implicated. They were arrested for There, Moshe Dayan greeted her
interrogation. It was the last time with bread and salt—a Polish, and
Mrs. Ciesielska saw her husband. Jewish, custom upon entering a
Her son Januscz, 4, was released new home.
One day, she was taken to a
to wander without food or shelter.
For four days he slept under a new building, from which three
bridge and finally, suffering from children emerged with a bouquet
hunger, stole a beet and ate it and a greeting in faltering
raw. The underground found him Polish: "Welcome to the thres-
and kept the boy till the end of hold of our new Ciesielski
School."
the war.
The highest honor, the warmth
Today a physician in Warsaw,
Januscz recalls how he shock with extended by the people of Israel,
remorse for his crime of thievery, is what makes her want to return.
She said the Israelis offered her
Mrs. Ciesielska said.
After four months of question- any job she desired if she would
ing and torture, whose scars re- remain. But her son is still in
main, Mrs. Ciesielska still had Poland. "I really am too young
not provided the Gestapo with to retire," she added.
Four months after she arrived
the information they needed
about the false identification in Israel, she was ordered, with re
papers. She was removed from gret, to leave immediately. Dis-
Krakow prison to Auschwitz, mayed that she might have done
where she would remain the next something wrong, Mrs. Ciesielska
three years.
left. One week later, she learned
In September 1944, as the last why she lied been sent home: the
of the Warsaw ghetto survivors Six-Day War broke out.
Being one of 935 Zanikei Umot
were being rounded up, Mrs. Cie-
sielska took on a new responsi- Olam, as Yad Vashem refers to
bility. Five hundred children, age them, Mrs. Ciesielska insists that
2 14, who had been separated from there were many Christians who
their mothers were placed under laid their lives on the line to save
Mrs. Ciesielska's voluntary super- Jews. She said she knows no
vision in Auschwitz. For half a Polish family that didn't have
year, until liberation in March some member who tried to help,
1945, she managed to keep all but but she admits that there were
three alive, with the aid of the "evil people in all nations" and
some who saved Jews did so only
underground.
To her sorrow, however, when for money.
liberation appeared imminent,
What motivated her own hero-
most of the children were moved ism? Two factors. "First, I sud-

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

suddenly realized, today they, to-
morrow we.
"Second," Mrs. Ciesielska said,
"I saw so many horrible things
being done to the Jews. How could
I not help? I suppose it was Chris-
tian conscience."



LAST DAYS—HURRY!

.SMOKE SALE!

Due to a fire on our block we are having

• •

Brandt Says He Kneeled
Before Warsaw Ghetto Monument
to Ask Pardon for Crimes
BONN (JTA)--Chancellor Willy
Brandt said in a magazine inter-
view that when he kneeled and
laid a wreath on the Warsaw
Ghetto memorial monument last
week he "wanted to ask for par-
don in the name of our people
for a million-fold crime which was
committed in the misused name
of the Germans."
Brandt's gesture, which was pic-
tured on television and in the
nress, has aroused controversy in
West Germany. according to the
Hamburg weekly, Die Welt, which
published the interview. Die Welt
also published the results of a
public opinion poll that showed
Germans to be sharply divided
over the appropriateness of the
gesture.
The poll, conducted by the Al-
lensbach Demoscopic Institute, re-

ported that of the 500 persons who
responded, 41 per cent approved
and 48 per cent disapproved.

U. TOO MUG WM

IMPSWE DOWN TOO WONT
MID A NINA WINt THAN

Friday, December 25, 1970-9

5 OW'

a STORE WIDE SALE.

UP TO

, OFF

• SUITS • SPORT COATS
• TOPCOATS • RAINBOATS • TUXEDOS

* All Pants

(Including Flairs and Knits)

1/2

off

ALTERATIONS AT COST

* All Furnishings

I/3

off

ENTIRE STOCK MUST GO!

• •

•••••• 41111/111011111MNIMIMMINIMMIMINNIMMININIMINHI

LADIES' AND MEN'S ALTERATIONS DEPT.
: AND FORMAL RENTAL DEPT. OPEN AS USUAL
Illeomosimumommommomme ■ mmomomert

RADOM TAILORS

and CLOTHIERS

22141 COOLIDGE

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Tues.-Wed.-Sat. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. This Sunday 11 am.-4 p.m.

14Uaa W'unrios, Dotroit, Mick.

-

Two Dropsie PhDs Study Israel

PHILADELPHIA—This year, for
the first time, two candidates for
the PhD degree at Dropsie Uni-
versity are conducting field in-
vestigations and further research-
es in Israel in preparation for the
writing of their doctoral theses.
The two students spending the
year in Israel after completine
their academic study requirements
at the post-graduate university
here, are Rabbi David Clayman
and- Walter Pick.
Rabbi Clayman, who was former
spiritual leader of Ramat-El Con-
gregation in the Mt. Airy section
of Philadelphia, majored in the
field of history and his thesis is
titled, "Henry Morgenthau, Sr.—
The Zionist Activities of an Anti-
Zionist."
Pick, who served as a major
in the Israeli Army and is a mem-
ber of the staff of the "Jewish
Encyclopedia," majored in Middle
East studies. The thesis he is writ-
ing in Israel deals with the "De-
velopment of Railways in Pales-
tine the 19th and 20th Centuries."
In addition to Rabbi Clayman

Dropsie in June, is engaged in
post-graduate studies at the He-
brew University in Jerusalem.
Dr. Abraham I. Katsh, president
of Dropsie, said that the educa-
tional ties between the local in-
stitution and Israel scholarship
are being further strengthened by
the fact that a number of Israeli
scholars and educators are serving
as advisers to doctoral candidates
to guide them in preparing their
Ph.D. theses in this country.
While they have already com-
pleted their terms as visiting pro-
fessors at Dropsie here and return-
ed Israel, ties are still being main-
tained as advisors to the doctoral
candidates here by Dr. Moshe
Goshen-Gottstein, in the field of
Bible and Semitic studies; Dr. Jo-
seph Nevada, in political science;
and Dr. Avraham Shaanan, in
modern Hebrew language and lit-
erature.
Dropsie University is the only
graduate institution of its kind in
the United States completely dedi-
cated to the study of Hebrew, bib-
lical and Middle East languages
and Pick, Rabbi Alex Shapiro, and cultures, and for higher Jewish
who received his PhD degree at education.

GROSS REA

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