100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 18, 1970 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Detroit Convention Bureau's of the board for 1971. Wineman,
board of directors re-elected who begins his second consecutive
JAMES H. WINEMAN chairman term as bureau head, is president
of the Wineman Investment Co.
Re-elected as a vice president of
the bureau was HAROLD BERRY,
Candy Centerpieces
executive vice president of the
Fisher-New Center Co. New di-
Personalized Party
rectors include CARL ROSEN-
Mementos
FIELD, president of Carl's Chop
Invitations and Party Ac- House.

cessories for all occasions.

sr

Zalenko-PecharIVedding
to Take Place in June

MUSIC
By
DANNY JAMES

MARCIA MASSERMAN

Featuring An Organ for
Today's New Sound
We also do house parties
271-4879

646-6138

Carl's Kosher

Meat & Poultry Market

MISS KAREN ZALENKO

incoln Shopping Center '

(Formerly at 7 Mile-Schaefer)

Featuring: the Finest in
Prime and Choice Meats pies
the most modern shopping
conveniences.

THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL
VEAL SCALLOPINI - STEAK PATTIES

CARL CARSON

OPEN SUNDAY

542-7450

ORCHARD LAKE SEA FOODS

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Zalenko of
Olde Franklin Dr., Farmington,
announce the engagement of their
daughter Karen Dale to Paul
Peckar, son of Mr. Mark Peckar
and Mrs. Florence Greenberg of
New York.
The bride-to-be is a Phi Beta
Kappa graduate of the University
of Michigan. Her fiance, a grad-
uate of Cornell University, holds a
PhD degree from the University of
Chicago.
An early June double wedding
is planned with her sister Gilds.
whose engagement was announced
earlier.

Located Inside Great Scott-14 Mile & Orchard Lake Rds.

8rzg agements

Presents Its

LARGE PEELED & DEVEINED

SHRIMP

$ 2 79 tb *

Also carrying a complete line of
fresh fish, live and cooked lob-
sters, fresh oysters and clams.
FOR SPECIAL CALL
DAVE OR ARNIE

851-5868

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Levine of
Panorama City, Calif, announce
the engagement of their daughter
Diane Nancy to Sheldon Lyle
Wolfe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morley
Wolfe of W. Lincoln Blvd., Oak
Park. Miss Levine is a graduate of
Sawyer College of Business, Los
Angeles. Her fiance received his
BS degree from Wayne State Uni-
versity.
• • •
Dr. and Mrs. B. Robert Diskin
of Kenwyck . Dr., Southfield, an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter Sandra to Harvey Leib-
erman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex
Lieberman of Rosemary Ave., Oak
Park. A March wedding is planned.

Hadassah to Participate
in White House Conclave

NEW YORK (JTA)—Hadassah,
the Jewish women's organization,
is to participate in the 1970 White
House Conference on Children,
Dec. 13-18, its national president,
Mrs. Max Schenk announced.
Mrs. High Salpeter, Hadassah
national chairman of Youth Aliya,
is to head the delegation.

Arnie Saltzman
Ethel & Dave Natinsky

We Bone, Skin & Grind Fish
Free of Charge

NATIONALLY ADVERTISED PRODUCTS AT LOW, LOW EVERYDAY PRICES

Extra Super Special

Raw

PICKLED
TONGUES

39` tb "

Super Special

Rokeach

All White or

White Fish & Pike

I

Delicious

I

Mans

1 APPLE-
GEFILTE
! SAUCE
FISH
$13
quart
lab
ab
l • 1 25-°x-

29c1

Extra Special

Famous White Star
Creamy. Rich

Pillsbury

SOUR
CREAM
38C

Pint
Carton

Extra Super Special
Faygo La-Cal Pop

All-Purpose

FLOUR

Your Choice

39c

I.

Strawberry-

C herry * Orang

5a;

Quantity

0 009000 wginimPRODUCE SPECIALS

lo

Hanuka Special

We Reserve
Right to Limit

Specials
good thru
Wed.

Red-Pop-Cola

:; s 2 . 4

Cans

O

.• PASCAL
CELERY

$1 79

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

FOR YOUR SPECIAL PARTIES OR OTHER EVENTS . . . TRY OUR

STRICTLY KOSHER TRAY SERVICE
Deity
Trays
JO 6-4640
For Free Delivery Ca/ _
tzggrvt,,DittrIaz:.: KOSHER BAR-B-0 CHICKEN

Ise Meet

GREEN-TENDER-
CALIFORNIA

me.

24 Size

Stalk



sax

U.S. NO. I

COOKING a
ONIONS
7 ,-labgh. 59C a

Ales

/Good Friday, Saturday, Sundaya.14 v

FRESH FISH DEPARTMENT

The finest and largess osloction in Hut
arse. Wdeco, bone, skin end grind
all Hsi free of chew. For special

service all

JO 6-4640

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, December 10, 1970-33

Jewish Community Represented
inDetroit—Y oung Guide to City'

A young Detroiter's curiosity
about his city has led to the publi-
cation of an interesting 294-page
"young guide" that includes the
Jewish community among its
facets of "ethnic" life north and
south of Eight Mile Rd.
Sheldon Annis, 25, a graduate
student at Wayne State University,
is teaching a course on ethnic
groups at the University Center
for Adult Education. It took him
and a few friends just over two
years to compile "Detroit—a Young
Guide to the City," which they
published themselves under the
name Speedball Publications. It
is now beihg distributed at most
book stores through Ludington
News and is "selling by the barrel
full," said its author.
Annis, son of Mrs. Sonia Hous-
ton Silvers, a former Detroiter
now of Fort Lauderdale, grew up
in Northwest Detroit. His curiosity
about the city led him to gather
many little-known, if not useless,
facts—like where to get a dog
psychoanalyzed and where to get
a muskrat dinner—but also sug-
gestions as to where inexpensive
meals can be found, unusual shops
and a walking tour of downtown
Detroit.
An illustration of what he offers
is found in the table of contents:
Four Personal Histories of Modern
Detroit (including an oral history
related by a Jewish bar owner);
Historical Spots Without Markers;
a Calendar of Seasonal Events;
Meeting People; Restaurants;
Shops; Sites to See; The Arts;
Music; Sports; Skiing; Black De-
troit; Ethnic Detroit (including a
section on Jews); the Hip Under-
ground; the Car Culture; Getting
Around Town; Accommodations;
Ann Arbor; and Miscellany —
"Everything that didn't fit in else-
where."
Annis went into his task with
obvious enjoyment, and there is
a youthful humor throughout
the paperback book. He Is not
always reverent, and his infor-
mation is not always accurate,
but he is generally fair.
A full three pages are devoted
to reminiscences about the early
Detroit community by Lou Horo-
witz, who was a young man during
the Depression and has been op-
erating bars in the black com-

Whan Coohin g ?

By

Ruth

Sirkis

(Copyright
1970,
JTA, Inc.)

is

Hanuka IS here again! That
wonderful family holiday we have
the privilege of enjoying eight
delightful days; eight days of
candle-lighting, Hanuka songs and
games, and of course, the latkes!
Lathes, as you all know, are potato
pancakes which taste ever so deli-
cious. They are brown, crisp and
heart warming. You may serve
them with sour cream or with
apple sauce—either way will do.
But be sure to enjoy them with
friends, relatives and "mish-
pokhe," because "togetherness" is
what Hanuka is all about!

2 pounds potatoes
2 eggs
I tsp. salt
2 this. flour or matzo meal
t!, tsp. baking powder
1 small onion
1 small apple
Oil for frying
Sour cream
Apple sauce
1. Grate peeled potatoes on a coarse
grater and drain. Also grate the
onion and the apple.
2. In a medium bowl beat lightly the
two eggs. Add the grated potatoes,
onion and apple and mix. Add salt,
flour and baking powder. Mix welL
3. In a large skillet heat the oil and
. drop the pancake mixture by table-
spoonful into the hot oil. Fry and
brown on both sides.
4. Serve the latkes while they are still
hot. Accompany the latkes with two
small bowls of sour cream and apple

munity for the past 30 years.
Horowitz recalls the Hebrew
school be attended and the old
Hungarian synagogue on Garfield
and Beaubien. "Another religious
building was the Hebrew Missio-
nary on Theodore St. At one time
this was the place where they used
to try to convert Jews to Chris-
tianity. It wasn't too popular with
the neighborhood people—to say
the least"
The Prohibition Era Purple
Gang and the Collingwood Massa-
cre are described, along with the
Depression, when "down at the
old Shaarey Zedek on Brush and
Willis, Jake Eizelman used to give
out free meals and lodging."
Annis admits there are omis-
sions from his book, and he is al-
ready planning another. Among
Jewish restaurants he's included
Alvin's Finer Delicatessen ("more
cool than kosher"), The Bagel,
Esquire Delicatessen on Dexter
("there just aren't that many
places left where you can get good
kishka and lungen"), Rascal
House ("the former northwest
Jews have a new spiritual home
since Darby's burned down"),
Samuels Brothers in the Eastern
Market ("cafeteria style and with
a Jewish accent—blintzes - that your
grandmother would rave about")
and suburban delicatessens like
the Stage, Nosherie, Northgate and
Original Esquire.
The Switching Post, antique
shop operated by Women's
American ORT, is mentioned,
along with the annual book sale
by Brandeis University National
Women's Committee. Annis de-
scribes the Jewish Theater of-
ferings as "inexpensive family
entertainment."
In a brief history of Detroit
Jewry, he relates the movement
of the community from the early
1800s. He mentions a few of the
institutions, like Shaarey Zedek
and Bnai David ("the city's most
radical departure from traditional
religious building style"). Bake-
ries, book stores, bagel factories
and kosher butchers are repre-
sented.
Some readers may take umbrage
at a statement like "Detroit Jews
have a delusion that they are being
persecuted out of their old neigh-
borhoods by the burgeoning black
population," or his description of
Shaarey Zedek as "a combination
of Gothic soaring, nouveau display,
and architectural bravado." But
Annis told the Jewish News he felt
that "being Jewish, I thought I
could be a little more critical of
my own?'
Generally, however, he presents
the Jewish community in an inte-
resting light. It must be the first
time a Bat Mitzva has been de-
scribed as "the American women's
liberation version" of a Bar Mitzva.
—C.D.

Dystrophy Party
to Cheer Victims

Mrs. Ira G. Kaufman, chairman
of the annual Children's Muscular
Dystrophy Party, announces that
all plans have been completed for
the event to be held 1-4 p.m. Satur-
day at the Veterans' Memorial
Building. About 200 children and
their parents are expected.
New Detroit Inc. is sponsor. The
Detroit Police Department will
provide assistance.
"National Jerry Lewis Muscu-
lar Dystrophy Awards" will be
presented to New Detroit Presi-
dent William Patrick and Detroit
.Police Commissioner John Nich-
ols and their respective agencies.
The Southwestern High School
Band will play seasonal musical
selections. Clowns, a ventriloquist
and magicians will be on the pro-
gram. Toys, refreshments, balloons
and gifts will be distributed by
Adas Shalom Sisterhood among
other groups.
The Detroit chapter of the Red
Cross. will provide transportation
for children without rides.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan