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November 27, 1970 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

New Hebrew U. Students Warned
of Expulsion if They Take Drugs

JERUSALEM—In a letter to all
new students, outlining the uni-
versity's new selection policy in
all departments, the university's
rector, Prof. Jacob Katz warned
the students of the Israeli laws
against the use of drugs and said
any student who disobeys the law
will be expelled.
Prof. Katz revealed in the let-
ter that, for the first time in its

drug taking and of the fact that
should they disobey this law, they
will be expelled. "Such a declara-
tion is clearly superfluous in the
case of Israelis who already know
the law and who are equally sub-
ject to it," Prof. Katz said.
"The existence of legislation

should not, however, be the sole
argument against drug taking—
certainly in regard to the uni-
versity student. By embarking
on a course of study at an insti-
tution of higher learning, a stu-
dent is in effect proclaiming his
intention of exploiting his intel-
lectual abilities to broaden his
opinions, deepen his understand-
ing and develop his own per-
sonality

history, the university is forced to
impose a selection policy in conse-
quence of the university's inabil-
ity to absorb all who applied for
admission.
Thus, he pointed out, those stu-
dents who have been accepted by
the university "are a privileged
.
minority vis-a-vis their peers who
were unsuccessful in gaining ad-
"There is an inherent contradic-
mittance. They have been given tion between the development of
an opportunity to pursue their in- intellectual abilities, on the one
tellectual development, and it is hand, and the search for satisfac-
by steadfastly devoting themselves tion through the breaking down
to this task that they will justify of the bounds of consciousness and
self - control, on the other," the
the privilege extended to them."
rector said.
Prof. Katz stated:
"There exists a school of
Pioneer Program Trains
thought which argues against
Immigrant Social Workers
society's right to trespass on the
A pioneering project in the edu-
individual sphere of action in
cation of social workers being
matters such as the use of drugs.
undertaken
by the Hebrew Univer-
The individual, claim the pro-
sity's Paul Baerwald School of
ponents of this argument, should
Social
Work
is both an attempt to
have the right to decide indepen-
dently whether he wishes to obtain answer a national manpower
shortage
of
professionals
and a
his satisfactions in life by means
new move in the direction of im-
which artificially heighten experi-
ence, and if the use of such means I migrant absorption.
The program offers an inten-
is in any way dangerous, it is up
to the individual alone to decide sive 13-month course leading to a
BSW
degree for immigrant stu-
whether the risk is personally
dents from abroad who already
worthwhile.
possess
a bachelor's degree in an
"This is a totally individualistic
stand which ignores the fact that allied field.
Starting
in June, the course will
the individual is a member of so-1
ciety and must therefore accept , wind up in the summer of 1971 with
certain limitations on his freedom a graduating class of some 22 or
which spring from this associa- 23 students who will by then have

tion.
"No society," Prof. Katz assert-
ed, "can exist on the basis of such
an individualistic approach and
certainly not a society such as !
ours which is based on far-reach-
ing mutual responsibility and aid.
Legislation in the state of Israel
forbids the use of hallucinatory
drugs and it is certainly unbecom-
ing to an institution of higher
learning to serve as a center of
appeal against such legislation and
its implementation."
Students from abroad enrolling
at the Hebrew University are re-;
quired to sign a declaration that
they are aware of the law against

covered a great deal of theoretical
class work and also have under-

experience in social work agen-
cies abroad, some had even
spent some time in Israeli agen-
cies—either as members of vol-
unteer programs such as Sherut
La'Am (a type of peace corps
for Israel) or as paid workers
who could not be accorded ap-
propriate status.

But they lacked the necessary
sound knowledge of Israeli insti-
tutions, local social work methods
and the types of problems likely
to be encountered.
The ministry of immigrant ab-
sorption felt so strongly that they
should be helped to qualify, that
it agreed both to pay their tuition
fees and to provide the budget
required by the school of social
work for running the special pro-
gram.

U.S. Hippies Take Over
an Abandoned Kibutz

NEW YORK ;ZINS') — A group
of young American hippies, mem-
bers of a Boston commune, have
been given the chance to, take over
an abandoned kibutz.
The group, which has the back-
ing of the Conservative synagogue
movement in the U.S., will be al-
lowed to farm its own land by the

Jewish Agency Settlement Depart-
ment. The Jewish Agency saw it
as a chance, remote as it may be,
to reach the large numbers of dis-
affected Jewish youngsters in the

U.S., and to put. their convictions
to some useful purpose in Israel.
If the group proves itself with-
in a year, the spokesman said, it
will be permitted to stay on,

Beth El Teens to Give
Impressions of Israel

taken two substantial periods of
Four students' "Impressions of
field work practice.
Israel" will be the theme of serv-
The idea was born in the 1969-70 ices at Temple Beth El 8:30 p.m.
academic year when a graduate today.
of the school, then working for
Reports will be given by Robin
the ministry of immigrant absorp- Levitt, Joan Merdler and Wendy
tion, drew the university's atten- Snyder, high school graduates from
tion to the fact that many young Temple Beth El's religious school,
immigrants—primarily from Eng- who spent the past summer in Is-
lish-speaking backgrounds—showed rael, and by Daphna Wolman, the
a strong interest in social work in temple's Eisendrath exchange stud-
Israel but lacked qualifications ent in residence.
demanded by the ministry of so-
cial welfare which would ensure
Philosophies are interesting to
them of academic grading.
the majority of people only while
In several cases, they had had
they are novelties.—Robert Lynd.

Survey Indicates Jewish Teen-Agers Are Issue Oriented

By BEN (IALLOB

ccncerned about restrictions on dents had protested Americanna-
(Copyr)ght 1970, .ITA, Inc.)
personal autonomy than were their tary policy, compared with about 6
A national survey of entering non-Jewish peers.
per cent of their non - Jewish con-
college freshmen conducted by the
The Jewish students were eval - temporaries. Almost 40 per cent
American Council on Education uated as more to the
left on the of the Jews, and 22 per cent of
indicated that Jewish teen-agers political spectrum: 45 per cent of the non-Jews, had protested against
are much more committed to so- the Jewish freshmen called them- high school administration policies.
cial changes and much more active selves "liberal,"
about them than are teen - agers of 28.6 per cent of compared with About 30 per cent of the Jewish

the non - Jewish teen - agers took part in political

other religious groups. The study, freshmen accepting that descrip- campaigns, compared with about
made last year, was supported in tion. A third of the Jewish students, 16 per cent of non-Jewish youth.
part by the National Science called themselves "middle of the
Foundation and the American Jew- road" compared to 45 per cent of
ish Committee. non-Jewish students. Twice as
The Jewish 18-year-olds also many non-Jewish students as Jew-
were reported to be much more ish ones labeled
themselves "mod-
. erately conservative" or "strongly
conservative" and nearly nine per
The National Council of Syna-
cent of the Jewish students called gogue Youth at Shaar Hashomay-
themselves "left" compared to less im Synagogue, Windsor, has in-

One° Shabat Set
by Habonhn Youth

^ • •

Habonim Labor Zionist Youth
will hold its first oneg Shabat of
the year for all youth age 10
After a program, there will be
Israeli singing, dancing and Habo-
nim's own version of a sit-in: a
through college - age 8:30 p.m. to-
day in the Workmen's Circle
Center.
"kumsitz." For information, call
Danny Schreier, 642-9532.
On Saturday evening at 7, Habo-
nim will have an informal discus-
sion of "The Nature of Faith" at
the home of Tamar and Michael

Levy, 18965 Fairfield.
lisibonim invites all Jewish youth
to participate in this "radical
approach to Judaism." For infor-
mation, call Danny Drachler, 64; -

9116.

Windsor Teens
Plan Coffee House

than three per cent of the others.
Nearly 60 per cent of the Jewish
students — compared with 24 per
cent of the non-Jews—favored le-
galization of marijuana. Sixty-three
per cent of Jews and 54 per cent
of non-Jewish students supported
a volunteer army. Almost 60 per
cent of the Jews and 36 per cent
of the non-Jews favored liberalized
divorce laws. Almost 90 per cent
of the Jewish students and nearly
75 per cent of the non-Jews sup-
ported legal abortions while nearly
67 per cent of the Jews and half
of the non-Jews supported ending
of capital punishment.
Almost 27 per cent of the Jewish
students, compared with about 10
per cent of the non-Jews, reported
they had protested racial injustice.
Twenty per cent of the Jewish stu-

vited two youth groups from De-
troit to take part in its coffee
house 8 p.m. Sunday at the syna-
gogue.
Teens of Young Israel and Bnai
David synagogues in the Detroit
area will take part in the pro-
gram, in which the Dor Hadash
(New Generation) trio will per-
form. Members of the trio are
Itzy Weisberg, Nate Frankel and
Efraim Taitelbaum. Teens age 13-
17 are invited.
Transportation is being ar-
ranged. For information, call
Young Israel NCSY President Den-
nis Eisenberg, 398-0222, or Mark
Plonakier of Baal David, 356-8191.
Adviser to the Windsor NCSY
group is Rabbi Melvin Sachs, 253-
1977.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

42—Friday, November 27, 1970

Israeli Pacifist's Tour Is Nixed by U.S. Group

Several board members dis-
agreed, arguing that they did
not believe that the JPF, as a
Jewish organization could "as-
sume the responsibility of spon-
soring a lecture tour by an in-
dividual some of whose points
of view may be considered
deeply harmful to the Jewish
people by many JPF mem-
bers." They cited "these critical
days for the state of Israel" as
pacifist, will make a tour of the
a factor in their views.
United States this month and
The newsletter said that the re-
next. He will speak first in New-
York at Saint Peters Lutheran sults of the mail poll were incon-
clusive
and for that reason, the
Church on Sunday under co-spon-
sorship of Rabbi Everett Gendler, JPF decided not to be a co-spon-
sor
for
the
tour.
a JPF board member, and the
Fellowship of Reconciliation.
The news letter reported that
several members of the JPF ex-
ecutive committee proposed that
the 27-year-old Israeli pacifist be
invited to speak in the United

NEW YORK (JTA) — The Jew-
ish Peace Fellowship decided to
cancel its co-sponsorship of a
United States tour by a young
Sabra pacifist who did not fight
in Israel's Six-Day War after a
poll of members of its board, the
pacifist and draft-counseling agen-
cy has reported.
However, the JPF newsletter
reported, Uri Davis, the Israeli

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