100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 20, 1970 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Welfare Federatio ns' Commitments Told at Assembly

(Continued from Page 10)
history and relationships, into a
period of interdependence of in-
dependent communities—to learn
from each other, to strengthen
each other, to enrich Jewish life
everywhere, to share Jewish re-
sponsibilities more effectively.
With Israel, too, our relationship
cannot be that of just benefactor
and beneficiary. It must be a
two-way enrichment of ourselves
as Jews."
Focusing on major problems in
America, what he called "disabili-
ties at home," Bernstein singled
out drug abuse as a problem that
has taken its "place on the agen-
das of communities."

Spectacles
With a Spectacular Guarantee

PRESCRIPTION OPTICAL CO.
543 - 3343

26001 Coolidge

He told the assembly that "Jew-
ish youths are far from immune
to this disease which plagues
America," and that "we must get
at the roots as well as the symp-
toms. We must find preventions
and cures and demonstrate them.
We must help society avoid the
meaningless and destructive, and
instead, find and apply the useful
and effective."
Stating that drug abuse is only
one aspect of the "problems of
physical and mental health that
concerns us," he reminded the
delegates of the growing and
broadening responsibilities of fed-
erations to plan for health services
in Jewish communities which are
no longer limited to hospitals, nor
only to large city federations.
"Now," Bernstein contin-
ued, "virtually all of our agencies
are involved in health services:
aged homes, nursing homes, fam-
ily welfare agencies, child care,
community centers and vocational
services. But if services are frag-

• • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••0







• •










OPEN SUNDAY 12-5

Complete line of

• Flares • Shirts

• Sweaters • Jacket



(Enro Dress Shirts)

THE TOGGERY

Men's & Boys' Wear

Lahser at 11 Mile — Harvard Row Mall

Open Thurs.,

ri.
Sat. Evenings
SFun. 12•3

353-1027

•: •










•41





• •

••••••••• 110•1111••••0••••••••••••••••••••••••••IIR

Is a word which describes
describes...

HARVARD ROW

Shopping Center

PERFECTLY

E

IS FOR THE EFFORTLESS SHOPPING
YOU'LL ENJOY AS YOU BROWSE

THROUGH THE 23 SHOPS AND SERVICE
STORES, UNDER ONE ROOF AT HARVARD
ROW.

IS FOR THE LUXURIOUS FEELING OF
KNOWING YOU ARE WELCOME AT
HARVARD ROW AND WILL RECEIVE
COURTEOUS TREATMENT FROM H. R.
MERCHANTS.

E

IS FOR THE EXCITING INTERNATIONAL
FLAVOR YOU'LL FIND AT HARVARD
ROW. CHINESE AND JEWISH CUISINE,
ENGLISH, FRENCH, JAPANESE AND
AMERICAN FASHIONS, ETC.

G

IS FOR THE GUORMET FOODS AND
CUISINE AVAILABLE IN THE FINE
RESTAURANTS AT HARVARD ROW. EAT
IN OR TAKE-IT-OUT. YOU'LL
THOROUGHLY ENJOY IT EITHER WAY

A

IS FOR ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING
YOU NEED. YOU CAN FIND IT AT
HARVARD ROW ANYTIME, EVERYTIME.
JUST TAKE TIME TO SHOP AT HARVARD
ROW.

N

IS FOR THE NEIGHBORLY SPIRIT WHICH
PREVAILS AMONGST H.R. MERCHANTS.
YOU'LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME IN THEIR
STORES AND SHOPS, BECAUSE THEY
CARE ABOUT YOU.

T

IS FOR THE SPRING-LIKE TEMPERATURE
TO BE ENJOYED YEAR-ROUND IN THE
ENCLOSED H.R. MALL YOU SHOP IN
7V TEMPERATURE REGARDLESS OF THE
WEATHER OUTSIDE.

Burton's Gal
Charlotte's Inc.
David's Ladles Shoes
DiRosa Hair Fashions
Empress Gardens
Fanner Jack's
Haber Cleaners
H. R. Barber Salon
H. R. Kosher Meats
A Poultry
Belle Jacob Wig Slop
Jerome's Tots 'n
Teens Shoes

Jewel Bakery
Jules Denson Travel Agency
Molter Furs
Margo's Children./ Shoppe
Mark Pharmacy
Morris Huppert Clothier
National Bank of Southfield
George Ohrensttin, C.M.W.
Jeweler
Original Esquire Rest. • Dell.
Parisian Fashions
Toggery of Harvard Row
Warren Optical Co.

HARVARD ROW Shopping Center

11 Mile

and Lehner Rds.

Southfield, Michigan

mented among agencies, the people
needing them are not served. They
require far more integrated serv-
ices and a much greater continuity
of care than they get."
Bernstein told the communal
leaders that federations' purposes
are not just the correction or pre-
vention of evils. They're more posi-
tive, he said. In dealing with fam-
ily, and child care, he said, "our
purpose is to strengthen the very
institution of family life and more.
To map out and carry out special
new programs that will restore and
enhance the special Jewish quali-
ties of Jewish families." To ac-
complish this, be called for a
"reorientation" of many of our
Jewish family and child care agen-
cies.
Calling for a change in the
concept of Jewish education,
Bernstein detailed the need for
federations to do more than
provide funds, "to assure that
there will be the greatest impact
from all influences that build an
understanding of Judaism, Jew-
ish commitment, that affect the
quality of Jewish life, and that
add to the enrichment of each
Jew's life and give strength to
the Jewish community."
He said the major concern is for
students to have an involvement in
Jewish life, "not just to learn
about it, but to be a part of it."
Turning to the improvement of
the quality of Jewish life, Bern-
stein reminded the delegates that
the National Foundation for Jewish
Culture was celebrating its 10th
anniversary at the assembly and
that a Task Force on Jewish Iden-
tity had been set up by the coun-
cil "to define what we can do
most productively to live compet-
ently as Jews, to develop a variety
of life styles for the variety of
American. Jews that will help them
fulfil. themselves as American
Jews.
"Its purpose," he added, "is to
make possible the designing and
testing and application of creative
innovations in Jewish life that
young people and their parents
need and seek so desperately.
Among the most impressive
sessions at the assembly was the
oneg shabbat that was sponsored
by the National Foundation for
Jewish Culture and was dedicat-
ed in honor of the 75th birthday
of Dr. Salo Baron. In an en-
lightening address, Dr. Baron
expressed optimism on future
developments In Jewish life in
the world. He gave an evalua-
tion of current experiences in
the light of historic events.
That session was addressed by
the foundation's president, Dr.
Jeremy Silver, who reported on
the progress attained by the
NFJC in the 10 years of its ex-
istence. The sum of $400,000 in
grants-in-aid was spent during
that period in providing for many
scores of fellowships. Among them
was one for Robert Rockaway of
Detroit who earned his PhD at
the University of Michigan with
his thesis on the history of De-
troit Jewry.
Dr. Silver told the delegates that
the academicians who have been
assisted in their work included 36
persons with doctoral degrees
teaching Judaica at 25 colleges
and universities; 58 without doc-
torates teaching at 48 institutions;
34 studying for post doctorates in
Judaica at 16 institutions; and 19
engaged in administrative and re-
search projects on 19 campuses.
About a dozen of the 147 are study-
ing in IsraeL The American insti-
tutions involved include also Co-
lumbia University, Yeshiva Uni-
versity, New York University,
Harvard and Princeton.
Rabbi Silver declared that the
foundation he heads has a pres-
tigious name but is without funds
it needs to carry out minimal
scholarship and fellowship pro-
grams.
Rabbi Silver urged the Jewish
communities to create something
like the nonsectarian Danforth
Foundation to support Jewish cul

tural projects. "I challenge the
Jewish community to produce a
$5,000,000 foundation whose stat-
ed purpose would be to provide
fellowships and scholarships for
graduate study in fields of Jew-
ish concern. I can think of no bet-
ter insurance for our future," he
said.
Overt action on the part of So-
viet Jewry for the right to emi-
grate to Israel and a dramatic
resurgence of "Jewish conscious.
ness" manifesting itselves
throughout the Soviet Union de-
spite a systematic program of
oppression, were the findings of
a special survey reported to the
assembly.
The report, issued by Dr. William
Korey, director of the United Na-
tions Office of Bnai Brith Interna-
tional Council, before delegates at-
tending an assembly workshop on
the plight of "Jews in Eastern Eu-
rsope," . surveyed the statistical
evidence of discrimination against
the Jews in the Soviet Union and
analyzed the reasons, methods, and
significance underlying the new
ferment among Soviet Jews.
Also addressing the workshop on
"Jews in Eastern Europe" was
Samuel L. Haber, executive direc-
tor of the American Joint Distri-
bution Committee.
Dr. Korey's talk, titled "The Not-
So Silent Soviet Jews," covered the
third major area of concern to the
1,500 community leaders attending
the assembly.
The most striking manifestation
of the new ferment of Soviet Jewry,
Dr. Korey, a specialist on Soviet
affairs, told the delegates, "are
the literally scores of petitions,"
signed by as many as 90 and all
asking for the right to emigrate
to Israel.
Dr. Yaacov Herzog, director
general of the prime minister's
office in Israel, addressing the
assembly, said that Arab atti-
tudes on the permanency of the
state of Israel were in the
process of change, and called on
Jewish leadership in Israel and
abroad to "art with a sense of
the new epoch of Jewish history

now unfolding."
At this plenary session chaired
by Edward Ginsberg, of Cleveland,
general chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal, dealing with "The
Middle East in the Shadows of
War and Peace," the Israeli diplo-
mat summarized the outstanding
factors which had created this new
situation.
At a meeting orzanized by the
CJFWF, a panel on communica"-
tions composed of Philip Slomovitz,
publisher of the Detroit Jewish
News and vice president of the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency; Abe
L. Sudran, executive director of
the Jewish Community Council of
Essex County (New Jersey); and
Al Blum, editor of the Pittsburgh
Chronicle; outlined the needs of
the press and its relationship to
the Jewish community.
Slomovitz stressed the need for
an awareness of communal require-
ments and pointed to the future
plans of the JTA for intensifying
and widening of its services in this
country and abroad.
A start in this direction, he said,
has been., made with the initiation
of a JTA apprenticeship program
for young men and women interest-
ed in becoming involved in the
field of Jewish journalism. There
have been five interns at the De-
troit Jewish News, one with the
Boston Jewish Advocate, one in
the JTA's Washington bureau and
one intern in the JTA's national
editorial office in New York.

THE

DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, November 20, 1970-11

M LTER

INC

OF HARVARD ROW

Designers of Fine Furs

Complete Fur Service

11 MILE AHD LAHSER
Phone: 358-0850

Sunday Only Specials!

OPEN 12 NOON TO 5 P.M.

special rack of

PANT SUITS & PANT DRESSES

dressy & casual styles

'/2 OFF!

while they last

SUNDAY ONLY!

holiday-time

JUMP SUIT

reg. $60 value

$3888

while they last!
SUNDAY
ONLTI

In dressy black and white
polyester crepe, with

rhinestone trim.

39"C.TR.M"

1W .E3

GLAMOUR AND LEISURE SPORTSWEAR

HARVARD ROW MALL

FASHIONS
11 Mile & Lohser
Southfield

J

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan