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September 25, 1970 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MIRM.AeDie,

Delightful and Informative Stories for Young Readers

Marilyn: Serbs ,portrays such a
wholesome and creative character
in a story simply titled "Marv"
that this teen-agers' book, pub-
lished by Doubleday, will delight
the young readers. With a series of
appropriate illustrations by LOuis
Glanzman, this narrative is full
of action and has interesting evi-
dence of familial loyalties.
Mary Green, the hero of this
book, is looked upon as peculiar,
as a dreamer who should pay more
attention to his studies and not
waste time with hammer and saw
and screwdriver and all sorts of
tools; that he should not gather
so much junk in the yard.
But his constant building finally
produces results. He has interest
ing ideas and the skill to build and
when, towards the end, in his sis-
ter's absence, he moves her to
tears with the pool he has built,
with the fine environment he has
created for himself, family, neigh-
bors—with the help of little friends
he has drawn into the work—he
emerges as the hero.
It is not only Mary the dreamer
and creator that emerges as the

Birth

wholesome factor in this book: it
is also the good neighborly:spirit,
the interest in the welfare of people
who surround the Green family,
the Jewish attitudes, that play im-
portant roles in this children's
story.
For instance, there is the picnic
that draws attention with the gen-
uineness of fun, the spirit of com-
munity singing — the introduction
of "Maydl maydl h'vill dir fregen
. . . naresher boher . . ." etc. .. .
as a song for community singing
together with "Rozhinkes mit
mandlen," "Lomir zilch iberbeten"
as well as "Home on the Range,"
"Clementine," and other selec-
tions . . . all making for a good
American-Jewish environment.
In the course of Marv's
dreaming there develops a theme

relating to historical experiences.
Mary dreanis of a way of cap-
turing Hitler. As an inventor and
builder he schemes and in his
dreams he convinces the Fuehrer,
as part of his plot, that he had
a secret weapon for him: that's
how he fools him into being cap-
tured ... all as a dream of a boy
who wishes to solve problems, in
this instance the world's prob-
lem of the time in which this
wholesome story is related.
It is all part of a tale in which

the cast of characters shows an
interest not only in Mary and what
appear as his silly ideas but also
Sept. 18 — To Mr. and Mrs in world affairs. The relationships
Melvyn Sternfeld (Donna Levine) between neighbors, an interest in
20329 Alderton, a daughter, Lisa newcomers to America, children's
roles all are intertwined to make
Hope.
• • •
Sept. 13—To Mr. and Mrs. How-
ard Levin (Susan Bliss), 23031
Eastwood, Oak Park, a daughter,
Sara Nicole.
By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX
o o a
(Copyright 'me, rra,Ine.)
Sept. 11 — To Mr. and Mrs.
Why is it that the person who
Richard M. Heavenrich (Elaine picks up the Torah scroll after
Hollander), 17137 Winthrop, a son, the Torah reading in the syna-
gogue is required to look at the
Adam Dov.
a • •
script in the scroll before be
Sept. 10—To Mr. and Mrs. Lewis raises the Torah, following which
Barr (Andra Wallace Winkelman), he turns completely around in a
of Maple Shade, New Jersey, a circle holding the scroll in a
raised position?
son, Alan Winkelman.
a a a
There are basically two motives
Sept. 9 — To Mr. and Mrs. Burt- for this act. One is to demonstrate
on Cohen (Sharon Duchan), 24321 that the Torah scroll, which is the
Cloverlawn, Oak Park, a son, Men- "word of God," relates to every-
one in the congregation and not
del Chaim.
• • •
just to the scholar or to the one
Sept. 8—To Mr. and Mrs. David who happens to read it publicly in
Shawn (Terri Rosenberg), 24011 the congregation. As he turns
Beverly, Oak Park, a son, Michael around, the script comes into view
from every angle. It is thus shown
Howard.
. • •
that the Torah is indeed no esoteric
Aug. 26—To Dr. and Mrs. Steven literature but the posession of all
J. Feldman (Karen Aston), former the people. Since the one who picks
Detroiters of Boston, a daughter, it up raises it up high — usually
over his own line of vision—it had
Melissa Lynne.
to be assured that he, too, looked
• • •
at the script. This is done before
Aug. 22—To Mr. and Mrs. David he lifts the scroll. Some take this
Levy (Barbara Burton). 24090 Con- latter practice to mean that one
don, Oak Park, a son, Mark Daniel. must be acquainted with the learn-
• • •
ing of the Torah before he at-
Aug. 17 — To Mr. and Mrs. Gary tempts to show the script to others.
• • •
D. Stern (Judi Tann), of 5463 Deer-
field, a daughter, Barbara Michele.
Why is it required to -have the

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Torah opened so that the seam
that ties together two pieces of
parchment can be seen when the
Torah is raised for all to see?

The Torah is thus displayed as a
unifying factor in human life, unit-
ing various individuals, diversified
groups and eventually even all the
nations of the world in the service
of the Almighty. It is also demon-
strated to be a unifying force in
human history, which seems at
times to be so disjointed.
• • •

Why is the Torah reading
chanted with notes instead of
being read in a "monotone?"
The melody of song involves an
emotional experience. Requiring
the Torah to be chanted instead of
read indicates that it is not an in-
tellectual involvement alone that is
required, but also an emotional
one "with all your heart and soul."
Indeed, Judaism disliked the Greek
practice of isolating the intellec-
tual from the throbbing heart, the
seat of emotion.

Three hundred American teen-
agers attended institutes in Israel
this past summer In projects of
the Mizrachi Women's Organiza-
'
tion bf.Alnerids_

"Marv" an enjoyable and highly
recommendable story for young
readers.
* a
For young readers, the G. P.
Putnam Documentary Series pro-
vides interesting material for study
relating to world affairs, history,
literature.
In "The Origins of World War
II," the author, Roger Parkinson,
gives an outline of events that led
to Nazism and the tragedies of
Europe under Hitler rule. The
author also outlines the background
of the war with Japan.
Parkinson's
conclusions
arz.
that the democracies were weak
and he states:

"The democracies themselves
largely failed and, in the inse-
curity of the failures, dictators
seized their chances: in Russia,
Italy and above all in Germany.
Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler—and
Franco in Spain — used -violent
methods and private armies to
climb to power, and used them
to consolidate that power: Stalin
with his 1936 purges, Mussolini
with his war against Abyssinia to
create unity at home, Hitler with
his 'Night of the Long Knives'
and his massacre of the Jews,
"In this new world of renewed
violence in public life, the old
democracies were unprepared
not only to protect others, but
also themselves. More oppor-
tunities were offered to the dic-
tators, and they seized them,
holding together in that fateful
year of 1939 to explode even
more of a worldwide conflict
than that which had erupted a
quarter of a century before."
The many important figures who
played their roles in the conflict,
including Leon Blum, Maxim Lit-
vinoff and others are referred to
id-this analysis. The Jewish tragedy
is not elaborated upon but the con-

clusion just quoted indicates the
horror to which Jews were sub-
jected by the Nazis.
o o
Among the children's stories
that ...Will - provide .delight for the
very young is "The Pink Suit" by
Marilyn Hirsh, who also drew the
splendid pictures for her story.
It's a large book for the youngest
readers, a story about little Eu-
gene's likes and dislikes in clothes,
his preferences for pink dragons
in Chinatown, the tour of China-
town and the thrills that went
with it.
—P.S.

Yitzhak Shenhar Stories
Published in 'Modern
Hebrew Classics' Series

A collection of short stories by
Yitzhak Shenhar has just been pub-
lished in a special edition by the
Tarbuth Foundation for the Ad-
vancement of Hebrew Culture, it
was announced by Abraham Good-
man, president of the foundation.
"The Shenhar Anthology" repre-
sents the third volume in the "Mod-

ern Hebrew Classics" series, be-
gun by the foundation with the
"Selected Essays of Ahad HaAm"
and continued with the "Selected
Stories of Asher Barash".
Ralph and Therms Wechsler of
Essex Falls, NJ., are the sponsors
of this special project, which was
initiated by Dr. Emanuel Neu-
mann, honorary president of the
foundation. Professor Abraham
Halkin of the Jewish Theological
Seminary serves as chairman of
the publications committee.

"The Tamarisk" and other
short dories by Shenhar, the
Yishuv's major Hebrew writer of
fiction between the two world
wars, have been edited by Dr.
Milton Arfa, professor of Hebrew
literature at Heater College In
New York. Dr. Ada has pre-
pared an introduction, a special
vocabulary and phraseology and
an appendix of exercises that of-
fer guidelines for an oral or
written discussion of the themes
treated in these dories.
The volume is available in cloth-
bound and paperback from the pub-
lications service of the Jewish Ag-
etkrn 515 P1 lrkt.- 1,rr f°114

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, September 25, 1970-41

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