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July 31, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Eyewitness Report on Current Condition in USSR

and a cantor, with choir, perform
the full service, with the aid of
microphones and amplifiers. The
average age of the group was
about 55. Only a few surreptitious-
ly confessed that they felt perse-
cuted and outcast. Most wearily
admitted that conditions were
"alles gut" in Leningrad. How-
ever, when I handed over a
mezuza to one of the leaders of a
minyan, he became excited and
admitted tearfully that new mezu-
zas were impossible to find in the
Soviet Union. This is also true of
taleisim, tephillin, yarmulkes and
prayer books.
There does seem to be slight
improvement along religious lines
in the USSR, at least superficial-
ly. For example, the large syna-
gogue on Arkipova Street in Mos-
cow was recently repainted and
refurbished. The synagogue in
Leningrad is scheduled for reno-
vation. This is due to the impact
of Jewish tourists from abroad who
demand to see these synagogues
and who have, in the past, com-
plained of their shabby condition.
The synagogue in Kiev—which has
no rabbi—remains run down and
There is a great sense of futil- dilapidated, probably because few
ity among Jews about applying
tourists ever visit it.
for emigration visas to Israel.
In the same vein, the Babi
They see the weary long-term
Yar cenotaph outside of Kiev,
efforts of their co-religionists in
though it still does not refer to
trying to get out and a pessi-
the Jewish tragedy which oc•
mistic attitude about emigration
curred there, is nevertheless
has developed even among the
well cared for and landscaped
young. Nevertheless, in Kiev, a
with flowers. It is rumored that
young man I spoke to was anx-
a new monument will be erected
ious to apply.
by the Ukrainian government
to
recognize the Jewish tragedy
I attended services during Sha-
—also probably the result of in-
vuot in Leningrad and can report
cessant
tourist demands to see
that about 300 men and women
Babi Yar.
filled the large synagogue on Ler-
Even a casual tourist can find
montov Prospect to hear a rabbi

By OWEN S. RACHLEFF
A Seven Arts Feature
Twelve days in the Soviet Union
does not make one an expert, but
it does provide an opportunity for
some meaningful experiences.
In Moscow, Kiev and Leningrad,
I made it my business to see, as
so many vistors do, the leading
synagogues, to speak to Jewish
citizens and to garner reactions
and opinions about Jewish life in
the USSR.
Young Jews do indeed seek out
tourists to make their message
heard. I found this to be particu-
larly true in Moscow where I had
occasion to visit the Saturn Res-
taurant, a leading gathering place
for young "swingers." Most of
them are devotees of the Kol Israel
news broadcasts heard daily at 7
p.m. On Russian radio. Despite
government attempts at jamming,
these broadcasts are beamed in
from Israel. They are in Russian
and Ukrainian and offer Hebrew
lessons besides. From these broad-
casts, young people have learned
about conditions in the Middle East
and in other parts of the world.

others," he said, "and the others
don't have very much. We want
to do the best work we can, but
we get second-rate jobs. They tell

us we're not really one of them,
but they won't let us go where we
belong."

Vemco ELECTRONIC

GARAGE DOOR

A



r t:Stry
ill Hi it-•leweL

FT

za

• 20010

James

CoizensDrive

Detroit 35. Michigan

Call Evenings Until 9

Intourist Bureau of the USSR
is by far the most efficient and
progressive non-military operation
among government institutions.
Therefore, tourism can be a tool
when it comes to improving Jewish
life within the Soviet state. As for
emigration, the outlook is less
promising, since a great deal will
depend on the Middle East con-
flict.

353-3284

-

Ce), Aftla ig



au 1,/044-C.P...

P'+on e: 342-5666

PACKER • PONTIAC

STILL THE WORLD'S LARGEST

Withal, it is not "alles gut" in
the USSR as some of the older
folks would have us believe.
Rather it is more in line with what
Mikhail, a young Jewish student,
told me at the Saturn Restaurant.
"We are given less than the

"REMEMBER"

WE SELL THE MOST

WE GIVE THE MOST

WHEN YOU lac A COCKTAIL
d
i a
g

eccez

• .,7

F , !■ 75 • 0,1,11.

!

WE CARE THE MOST

MILT LEVIN
Call 863-9300

41;

RED STOTSKY
Call 863-9300

18650 LIVERNOIS, SOUTH OF SEVEN

Co-sponsor of increased homestead exemption for
senior citizens, reducing their tax-load during
the Golden Years.

STATE SENATOR
15Th DISTRICT • DEMOCRAT

CORPORA1 ED

6g";

,Jewish feelings towards Israel
and the age-old love of Zion, are
taboo in the view of the govern-
ment. Yet even the Kremlin is
vulnerable in this regard.

KRAMER WORKS FOR THE
SENIOR CITIZEN

KRAMER

7-71 (,,'i nt

OPENER

THE KRAMER RECORD

ELECT REPRESENTATIVE
ALBERT A.

lI

manifestations of the Soviet anti-
Zionist attitude in the press and
in pamphlets and booklets at air-
ports and other places for foreign
consumption. At the Moscow air-
port, I was able to pick up a book-
let of over 75 pages entitled
"Zionism: Instrument of Imperial-
ist Reaction" published by Novosti
Press Agency. An English langu-
age publicataion, New Times, had
in its spring issue a story entitled
"Inside Israel" which spelled out
the usual Soviet line about "im-
perialist and aggressive Israel."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
6—Friday, July 31, 1970

KRAMER WORKS FOR
THE COMMUNITY

KRAMER
WORKS
FOR
ISRAEL!

Author of the amendment to the Building Au-
thority Act permitting recreational consturction
in communities of Michigan. This amendment
has been used by both Southfield and Oak Park
to build new recreational facilities.



Sponsored the low which made permanent Blue Cross coverage

mandatory for dependent minors who are physically or men-
tally handicapped.



Introduced law to prevent unfair cancellation of auto liability

insurance. The law is known as the "Kramer Act."



Co-sponsored the Law on Pollution, which permits citizen par-

ticipation in the fight against pollution, and has introduced

another which creates a Department of Environmental Control,

focusing responsibility in this most important area.



Co-sponsor of the State Fire Insurance Law which provides a fire

insurance pool for property owners.



Co-sponsor of law aiding communities in the hiring of policemen

and firemen.



Chairman of Blue Cross-Blue Shield investigation, designed to

reduce their rates and improve the quality of their service.

KRAMER WORKS FOR YOUTH

Author of legislation requiring upgraded standards of psy-

chological testing in public schools, together with guidelines

for evaluation which safeguard the individual's privacy.

KRAMER WORKS FOR
THE HANDICAPPED

HE THINKS ABOUT YOU!
HIS RECORD PROVES IT!
Paid for by Volunteers for Kramer Committee

Author of the original amendment for state support of sum-

mer school programs for the handicapped, which benefit

children throughout the state.

Above is a copy of the most
recent resolution sponsor-
ed by Al Kramer in the
Michigan House of Repre-
sentatives.
By this resolution, Kramer
caused the house to go on
record u rging President
Nixon to deliver jets and
other needed armaments
to Israel. Another way Al
Kramer thinks about you!

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