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April 03, 1970 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

20—Friday, April 3, 1970

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Cassin Expresses Sliver of Hopeon Peace in Mid East

NEW YORK (JTA) — Nobel
Peace prize winner, president of
the Alliance Israelite Universelle
and vice president of the United
Nations Commission on Human
Quartet as artist-in-residence.
Haim Shtrum, a Tel Aviv native
Rights since 1946, Prof. Rene
he
was
During
the
three
years
who has been violinist with the
Cassin
declines to view himself as
associated with this group, he
Detroit Symphony Orchestra since
an optimist but insists "I am not
performed at the National Gal-
1968, will be guest soloist at the
a pessimist, not a complete one"
lery of Art in Washington, D.C.
Spring Festival of Music sponsored
and on many university cam- about the future of the UN. emerg-
by Cong. Beth Achim April 12.
ing nations and the possibility of
puses.
Prior to 1959, Shtrum played with
peace.
Since arriving in Detroit, he
the Kol Yisrael Symphony Orches-
In an Interview in the April
helped
organize
the
Saint
Clair
tra, the Haifa Symphony and the
issue
of Penthouse, Prof. Cassin
Ramat Gan Chamber Orchestra. String Quartet which has appeared
rejects
the view that working for
in
concert
and
on
radio
and
tele-
While serving in the Israel Army.
peace "is a waste of time" despite
he played in its symphony orches- vision.
the
number
of conflicts and wars.
Shtrum will include in his pro-
tra.
He notes that the various insti-
After coming to the United gram violin selections from the
States in 1959, the young violinist works of Joseph Achron, Ernest tutions created for this purpose
received a scholarship at Juilliard Bloch, Paul Ben-Haim and Marc "are still very feeble. U Thant
School of Music in New York City. Lavry. Lawrence LaGore will ac- (secretary general of the UN) has
every reason to complain often
He also was awarded a four-year company Shtrum on the piano.
Also appearing on the program that many c onflic ts are not
scholarship from the National Or-
chestral Association and received will be the Beth Achim Festival brought, or are brought too' late
the Serge Koussevitsky Fellowship Chorus, conduc t e d by Cantor into the jurisdiction of the United
Simon Bermanis, with Bette Traub Nations."
to study at Tanglewood, Mass.
Following graduation from the at the piano.
Even when these disputes are
JuilHard School, he joined the
Tickets are on sale at the syna- brought into the UN, Cassin
University of Detroit String gogue office, Southfield.
states, "they are not handled there
in the way they should be han-
dled." Furthermore, he says. "I
will
not hide from you that I am
Boris Smolar's
not a pacifist in the sanctimonious
sense of the word . . . The idea
that one must fight for peace is
not a false one."

Israeli-Born Violinist to Perform
at Beth Achim- Concert April 12

'Between You
...and Me'

(Copyright 1970, JTA Inc.)

Discussing the Declaration of
Human Rights which. he helped
frame in his capacity as vice
chairman of the UN's Human
Rights Commission, Prof. Cassin
notes that many nations have
not yet ratified this document.
"In fact," he states, "we cannot

-- --
PRESS CENTENNIAL: The American Jewish community is cele-
brating the 100th year of the existence of the Yiddish press in this
country. There weren't many Yiddish-reading Jews in the United States
in 1870, when the first Yiddish newspaper made its appearance on
March 1 in New York. However, there were enough Jews to stimulate Israeli's Plan for Funds
-the publication of Di Yiddish Zeitung, which termed itself on its mast- to Underdeveloped Lands
head "a weekly paper of Politics, Religion, History, Science and Art."

The interesting thing about the first Yiddish newspaper is that its
appearance was made possible by Horace Greeley, the editor of the
Tribune, New York's influential daily. Greeley was a candidate for
President of the United States on a Liberal-Republican ticket supported
by the Democracts. Greeley contacted a leading Jewish immigrant,
J. K. Buchner, who had had some journalistic experience "in the old
country." Buchner was popular among the Jews in New York as the
head of the Hebrew Institute, a Jewish educational establishment.

Recommended to Nixon

JERUSALEM (JTA) — A plan
for the international financing of
underdeveloped countries, devised
six years ago by- David Horowitz,
governor of the Bank of Israel, has
been recommended to President
Nixon by a select research com-
mittee comprised of leading Amer-
It was no easy matter to start a Yiddish publication in New York ican bankers and financiers. •
100 years ago. There were no Jewish printing plants at that time in the
The group, headed by Rudolf A.
city. Thus, Buchner started his paper in a lithographed form. It Peterson, president of the Bank of
appeared on Fridays and its price was 6 cents a copy. It existed seven America, was appointed by Presi-
years.
dent Nixon last September and
Meanwhile, when the Franco-Prussian war broke out in July 1870, reported to him on March 4. Horo-
another immigrant Jew, Zvi Hirsh Bernstein— an uncle of Herman witz presented his plan at the first
Bernstein, who later gained a high reputation as an American journalist conference of UNCTAD (United
—got the idea of publishing a Yiddish newspaper for Jewish immi- Nations Conference on Trade and
grants. Many of the immigrants to this country came from the area in Development) in Geneva in 1954.
It would require each devel-
Poland and Russia bordering on Prussia. They were greatly interested
oped country to set aside a fixed
in the war news. In order to make the new paper—which was named
proportion
of its national income
the Post—a succes, it was imperative to publish it not in a lithographed
for long-term, low interest loans
form but in a printed form.
to developing countries. The use
The publisher started by importing Jewish type from Vilna, Russia,
of the funds would be left largely
which was a center of the Jewish printed word. He simultaneously dis-
up to the governments of the
covered that there was in New York a Hebrew writer, Zvi Gershuni,
developing countries with no po-
who had learned typesetting in London. He engaged Gershuni not only
litical interference in their af-
as a typesetter but also as a co-editor. The Post thus began publication
fairs.
in August 1870 as the only printed Yiddish publication on the American
Its effect would be to afford
continent. It appeared every week for six months. Publisher Bernstein underdeveloped countries easy ac-
later used its Jewish type to publish, in 1871, the first weekly in Hebrew cess to the international capital
in this country—Hazofeh b'Eretz Hachadasha (The Observer in the New market. President Nixon's commit-
Land). This paper existed five years.
tee recommended application `of
the Horowitz plan by the U.S.
CENTURY OF PROGRESS: Various weekly newspapers in Yiddish
were pubilshed during the, 1870s, but the first daily Yiddish newspaper, Labor Concord Returns
Tegliche Gazetten, appeared in New York on June 18. 1881. It was the to the Concord Hotel
first Jewish daily newspaper not only in the United States but in the
KIAMESHA LAKE—With labor
entire world. It existed only three months as a daily and became a
weekly that lasted for 54 years. In 1885. the same publisher made an- peace returned to the Concord
Hotel, the doors of the nation's
other attempt to publish a daily newspaper, with Yiddishes Tageblatte.
largest resort hotel are open once
This time the paper appeared daily without interruption—except Satur-
again for vacationers and conven-
days and Jewish holidays—for 45 years, until it was merged with the
tioners. Scheduled for this weekend
Morgen Journal, another Yiddish daily newspaper, which started
is one of the resort's singles pro-
publication in 1901.
grams, entertainer Julius LaRosa
Other Yiddish daily newspapers began to appear at the end of the and an anticipated attendance of
1890s. Their number as well as their circulation grew constantly as 2,900 single men and women.
more and more Jewish immigrants began to reach this country follow-
The upstate New York resort
ing the rise of anti-Semitism in Europe, especially in Russia and closed March 15 after union mem-
Romania. Outstanding among them was the Jewish Daily Forward, bership and management could not
which was started in 1897. Much has been written about the Forward reach accord.
Guests and convention reserva-
and its great editor, Abraham Cahan.
tions were notified of the suspen-
Another Yiddish daily newspaper still existing today is Der Tag
sion of operations and consequent
(The Day), which was established at the end of 1914. It swallowed up
cancellation by telephone and wire
the Morgen Journal. Der Tag-Morning Journal, as the paper is now
with Concord management making
called, reflects Zionist views and pays attention also to Orthodox events.
efforts to relocate guests and con-
Because 80 per cent of American Jewry is now American-born and vention groups. Several organiza-
feels itself at home in English and because there is no more Jewish tions, anxious to retain the Con-
immigration from Europe, the circulation of the Yiddish press has cord site, arranged to postpone
dropped greatly during the last 25 years. Today only two major Yiddish their conventions to later dates.
daily newspapers exist, the Forward and the Tag-Morgen Journal.
At a membership meeting of the
There is a third daily newspaper, Morgen Freiheit, which appears in union last week, rank and file
tabloid size, but its circulation is insignificant. It maintains a pro-Soviet, members voted to accept the
orientation and is therefore not popular.
agreement and to return to work.

I

Prof. Cassin scores the amounts
spent on armaments as "outra-
geous." It is "scandalous that the
Great Powers supply arms to the
smaller nations who are at war
He observes that the Soviet or who are preparing for war."
Union has not ratified the declara- But, he adds, peace will not be
tion and has, until now, refused achieved by total disarmament.
to sign any treaty to this purpose. Instead, he advocates the develop-
"So how can we expect the Soviet ment of "regional authorities which
authorities to respect the Declara- can dispose of certain arms and
tion of Human Rights? My own men . . . Call it international po-
country, France is in the same lice or a United Nations peace-
position, like so many others, at keeping force .. .
this moment it doesn't look as if
she will ratify the Declaration."
Discussing whether the veto
SCHECHTER S. HIRSCH'S
power by the hig powers in the
UN is an obstacle to peace, he
states, "I am in favor of limiting
0 GLATT
KOSHER HOTEL
the veto in certain matters. But
FON Ocualroot Illoci - 37th to 35th St.
it cannot be abolished. After all,
MIAMI BEACH, FLA.
there are groupings of nations that
Make Reservations for
are more powerful than others,
Summer Vacations NOW
which have overwhelming respon-
114.daily per person.. ,
sibilities."
double occupancy
MAR. 22 to APR. 19
But, Cassin adds, that in the
25 of 157 rooms
assembly "voting results are often
INCLUDING MEALS
irresponsible, impulsive, so how
CALL
MIAMI
BEACH
can you expect nations that take
YOUR
their responsibilities seriously to
• RESERVATION
obey such votes? Even the Security
Dial
:
800-327-8165
Council has often voted resolutions
Or Coll N.Y. Off: PL 7-4231
apportioning blame, giving orders
Eves. S. Sun. FA 7-1742
that were unjust and far from
reasonable . "

even speak about the violation
of this international agreement,
for, as far as most countries are
concerned, the agreement is not
in force."

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THE RATE

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all Rates
WEEKLY PER PERSON
DOUBLE OCCUPANCY

Apr. 1 to Apr. 29

Apr. 8 to Apr. 29

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Social Hostess
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PASSOVER FAMILY PLAN
April 20-28

FREE • 1st child in room.
2nd child — $10.00 per day.

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79th Street Causeway - Miami Beach, Florida
Miami Beach, Fla.(Call Collect): 305 751-7561 -
Or See Your Travel Agent
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