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February 13, 1970 - Image 35

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Research Is Urged Among Jewry
of Large Cities; Findings Relayed

NEW YORK (JTA)—Large cities
tend to have a lower percentage of
synagogue members, and intermar-
riage rates in larger cities tend to
be higher than in smaller cities, a
Jewish research authority reported
here with a qualification that such
conclusions should be considered
hypotheses which require testing
with more research.
Dr. Victor D. Sanua, associate
professor in the school of educa-
tion at City College of New York,
presented these and related find-
ings at the second annual presenta-
tion of the Charles Rosenthal
awards at the Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Dr. Sanwa, who has
repeatedly urged a greater invest-
ment in Jewish research, told the
meeting that "We know more about
the Jews in small towns than we
know about the Jews in New
York." He added that studies of
the affiliated and non-affiliated
Jews have to date been limited.
In citing some of the tentative
findings from surveys in a number
of cities, Dr. Sanua said that they
also showed an apparent correla-
tion betwen the extent of Jewish
education and the percentage of
synagogue affiliation. The Jewish
education of children aged five to
19 is more extensive in cities where
there is a higher frequency of
synagogue membership. In report-
ing the tentative findings on inter-
marriage rates, he said Washing-
ton, Boston, Rochester, Long Beach
(California) and other areas with
the lowest synagogue affiliation
had the highest intermarriage rate.

Oirtlz

Greater even than the pious man
is he who eats that which is the
fruit of his own toil; for Scripture
declares him twice-blessed.
— Talmud.

✓ nnouncements

Feb. 4—To Mr. and Mrs. Joel
Fisher (Madeline Kalisher), 3376
Coolidge, Royal Oak, a son, Ari
Allen.
• • •
Feb. 9—To Mr. and Mrs. Shel-
don J. Davidson (Cheryl J. Porn-
eranz), 22181 Cloverlawn, Oak
Park, a son Jeffrey Steven.

SHALOM RALPH

MOHEL

LI 7-9489

RABBI SHAIALL

ZACHARIASH

MOHEL

341-1595

REV. GOLDMAN L

MARSHALL

MOHEL

353-5444

RABBI JOSHUA SPIRO

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Serving in Hospitals & Homes

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Other cities in which the surveys
cited by Dr. Sanua were made
were Providence, R.I., Camden,
Northern Delaware, Milwaukee,
Detroit and Los Angeles.
In another report on six cities
where the question was posed as
to what makes "a good Jew," a
table showed that the most import-
ant factors listed by the partici-
pants were leading "an ethical and
moral life," belief in God, and ac-
ceptance of being a Jew "and not
try to hide it." Other factors listed
were gaining respect of Christian
neighbors, knowing the fundament-
als of Judaism, belonging to a syn-
agogue, supporting all humanitar-
ian causes, working for equality for
minority groups, attending High
Holy Day services, marrying with-
in the Jewish faith, contributing to
Jewish philanthropies and support-
ing Israel. Least important to Jews
was attending weekly services and
observing dietary laws. Dr. Sanua
added that the Jews participating
in that study were all members of
Jewish organizations. He also re-
ported that at the present time no
studies were being made on un-
affiliated Jews and on how to reach
them. Dr. Sanua urged. Jewish
agencies to invest in surveys to
pinpoint the problem.

LI 1-9769

REV.
HERSHL
ROTH

Mohel

Pennsy BMW Sets Up
Limited Sanctuary
for Draft Resisters

PHILADELPHIA (JTA) — Ar-

rangements for a limited sanctuary
for draft resisters and deserters
from the armed forces, acting for
reasons of conscience, became ef-
fective Feb. 5 at the Hillel Foun-
dation house at the University of
Pennsylvania. The development
was reported to be the first of its
kind in any Hillel Foundation in
the United States.
Rabbi Samuel Berkowitz, Hillel
director, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the proposal
stemmed from several months of
discussion among members of the
Hillel student executive council,
which approved the idea after con-
ducting a referendum among the
3,500 Jewish students at the uni-
versity. He said the idea received
overwhelming approval among the
511 students who voted in the
referendum.
In announcing the plan, the
students used the Hebrew word
"Miklat," with the description
"non-violent draft sanctuary," to
describe the nature of the re-
fuge. The statement of the stu-
dent executive council empha-
sized that there would be no
resistance, "violent or non-vio-
lent" to "the entry and function
of law enforcement officials
attempting to discharge their of-
ficial duties, on the part of the
draft resister, his supporters, or
any official of the Hillel Foun-
dation."
Rabbi Berkowitz said that the
student executive, in setting up the
"Miklat," hoped to give a con-
cerned draft resister or soldier
absent without leave "an oppor-
tunity to publicly demonstrate his
moral opposition to the draft or to
the war in Vietnam."
The statement added that the
"Miklat" would "in no way give
a draft resister immunity from
the law or arrest. After the resist-
er is formally received into the
`Miklat,' a registered letter will
be sent to federal authorities in-
forming them that a draft resister
is in the Hillel `Miklat.' Members
of the university community will
be able to sit and talk with the
resister until he is arrested."

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, February 13, 1970 35

-

Novosti Announces New Yiddish Book

In an article written for the
USSR Novosti Press Agency and
released to The Jewish News by
the USSR embassy in Washington,
Semyon Rabinovich tells about a
new book by Joseph Rabin, pub-
lished in Yiddish by Sovetsky Pisa-
del Publishing House of Moscow.
Novosti writer Rabinavich states
about this 500-page book:
"This is a large canvas that re-
flects the historical events of the
beginning of the present century—
the period of reaction that followed
the defeat of the first Russian rev-
olution, the massacre of the work-
ers at the Lena Goldfields, the new
upswing of the workers' movement,
World War I and the Revolution of
1917.
"It took the writer 15 years to
write the novel. The fates of the
personages interlace with the fate
of the people, of the country and
the Revolution.
"Joseph Rabin describes with
great mastery Jewish home life,
age-old customs and traditions, and
the relationship between different
social groups. At the same time
the writer points out that real hap-
piness, real freedom and better
life conditions can be obtained only
as a result of the joint struggle
with other nationalities, in the in-
ternational rallying of all working
people irrespective of their nation-
ality or race.
Joseph Rabin will be 70 at the
beginning of next year. He was
born in the city of Grodno on the
Neman. He spent his young years
in Lithuania where he took part
in the revolutionary movement and
carried out dangerous assignments
of the Communist underground.

Feb. 1—To Mr. and Mrs. David
M. Craine (Maureen Pope), 29251
Fairfax, Southfield, a daughter,
Michelle Ilene.
• • •
Jan. 31—To Mr. and Mrs. Shel-
don LepTer (Reva Taylor), 23621
Plumbrooke, Southfield, a son,
Marc Steven.
* •
Jan. 30—To Mr. and Mrs. Allen
Gersh (Sandra M. Lenhoff), 21920
Avon, Oak Park, a son, Andrew
Nobody can be so amusingly ar-
Richard.
* a
rogant as a young man who has
Jan. 29—To Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. just discovered an old idea and
Stark (Sue Wolfgang), 21650 Strat- thinks it is his own.
— Sydney Harris.
ford, Oak Park, a son Ariel Chaim.

Jan. 28—To Dr. and Mrs. Law-
rence Ruzumna of Boston (Sharon
Bez of Detroit), a son, Jeremy.
• • •
Jan. 27—To Mr. and Mrs. Alfred
Tobocman (Paula Williams), 29252
Summerwood, Farmington, a son,
Steven Hershel.
* a a
Israel Tour For Teenagers
Jan. 26—To Mr. and Mrs. Wil-
• FULL AND
EXCITING
liam Winer (Kathlyn Meyers), of
WEEKS
Kalamazoo, a son, David Norman.
• FOR JEWISH
HIGH SCHOOL
* * *
STUDENTS
Jan. 24—To Mr. and Mrs. Har-
• AGES 15 to 18
ROUND TRIP

Shapiro
(Barbara
Ann
M.
vey
BY JET
Glick), 27115 Aberdeen, Southfield,
a daughter, Allison Lynne.
IN ISRAEL, ITT
• * •
PARTICIPANTS ENJOY:
Jan. 22—To Mr. and Mrs. Ber-
•Visits to Biblical landmarks and
holy places.
nard M. Friedman (Judith
• Meeting with government officials
Jacobs), 24140 Westhampton, Oak
and lectures on Israeli life.
• Gatherings with Israeli youth.
Park, a son, Kenneth Irwin.
• Trips through the length and
* • •
breadth of the land
Jan. 19—To Dr. and Mrs. Stephen
• Work period with kibbutz pion.
neers.
Wittenberg (Sandra Forman), 29230
Guy, Southfield, a son, David
SHABBAT & KASHRUT
Aaron.
OBSERVED
• • *
SPONSORED BY HADASSAH
Jan.. 12—To Mr. and Mrs. Irvin
ZIONIST YOUTH COMMISSION
Gastman (Eda Halpern), 1335
In cooperation with the Amrican
Huron . River Dr., Ypsilanti, a son,
Zionist Youth Foundation, Inc. and
the Jewish Agency (Jerusalem). The
Brian .Rubin.
Youth Commission is an acknowledg-
*
ed leader in Jewish education and
camping and has conducted annual
Jan. 5—To Mr. and Mrs. Law-
Summer in Israel courses since 1951.
rence Millman (Barbara Raznick),
Experienced and responsible Amer.
ican and Israel leaders supervise
22170 Stratford, Oak Park, a
and guide the group ensuring ex.
daughter, Cheryl Ellen.
pert direction and care. For bro-

1411, St.
York. 51 Y 10J1i
011•ym -11134

GUARANTEED
RESULTS

35241638

MEXICO CITY
AND ACAPULCO

only $ 529

DEPARTURES: February 26
March 5, 12, 19 for 12 DAYS

4 Nights Mexico City at the elegant
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7 Nights Acapulco at the new,
deluxe 28 story Holiday Inn

INCLUDING:

Air fare from Detroit, round trip. Deluxe accommoda-

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CALL WITHOUT DELAY

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chure and further information write
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HADASSAH FIONIST nUT14

DOG
OBEDIENCE
TRAINING

ee Presents ka t

'925

FOR TEENAGERS

I love to discuss problems with
young people because their prob-
lems are so simple and can be
solved with a few dollars.
—William Feather.

PLANNING A VACATION!

liE

Dec. 30—To Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Blacher, 28775 Tavistock Trail,
Southfield, twin son and daughter,
Robert Evan and Julie Ilene.
• • •
To Mr. and Mrs. Dave Diskin
(Denise Weston), 23050 Seneca, Oak
Park, a son, Douglas Charles.

Later, after moving to Moscow,
Joseph Rabin worked and at the
same time studied and tried his
hand in literature.
"During the 45 years of his
work as a writer Joseph Rabin has
written dozens of novels, stories,
short stories and essays that have
won the high appraisal both of the
critics and the wide reading public.
"In his foreword to Rabin's book
"Shalom Aleichem's Street," the
critic Girsh Bemenik says that un-
like those writers who withdraw
into the narrow circle of a certain
theme, Rabin is constantly extend-
ing his artistic scope and creating
a vivid gallery of characters.
"The novel "By the Neman" is
typical of these features, too. The
same as Rabin's other works, it is
permeated with true popular hu-
mor in the spirit of the immortal
Shalom Aleichem."

4526 t•4

ir/ "/X'

wOODWARD ROYAL OAK

JO 6-1490



LI

9 6733

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