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February 06, 1970 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-02-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, February 6, 1970-19

Christian Journalists Say
Prayer at Yad Vashem

JERUSALEM (JTA)
F if t Y
Christian journalists representing
religious news media on Jan. 27
recited a moving memorial prayer
at the Yad Vashem, Israel's monu-
ment to the Jewish victims of the
Wart Holocaust.
The prayer was composed by
Msgr. John M. Osterreicher of
the Institute of Judaeo-Christian
Studies at Seton Hall University, a
Catholic institution in South
Orange, N.J.
The journalists were visiting Is-
rael as guests of the foreign min-
istry and the ministry of tourism.
Their tour was arranged through
the Anti-Defamation League of
Bnal Brith, with Israel's airline
El Al, providing transportation.
They represented the Associated
Church Press, the Catholic Press
Association, the Religious News-
writers Association and the Evan-
gelical Press Association.

JIIL

Israel Tour For Tee-agers

• FULL AND
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• FOR JEWISH
HIGH SCHOOL
STUDENTS
• AGES 15 to ll
• ROUND TRIP
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IN ISRAEL, ITT
PARTICIPANTS ENJOY:

• Visits to Biblical landmarks and
holy places.
• Meeting with government officials
and lectures on Israeli life.
• Gatherings with Israeli youth.
• Trips through the length and
breadth of the land
• Work period with kibbutz pion.

nears.

SHABBAT & KASHRUT
OBSERVED
SPONSORED BY HADASSAH
ZIONIST YOUTH COMMISSION

In cooperation with the Amrican
Zionist Youth Foundation, Inc. and
the Jewish Agency (Jerusalem). The

Youth Commission is an acknowledg-
ed leader in Jewish education and
camping and has conducted annual
Summer in Israel courses since 1951.
Raperienced and responsible Amer.
lean and Israel leaders supervise

and guide the group ensuring ex.
pert direction and care. For bro-
chure and further Information write

Israel's Air Force Described on TY
as Superb Team With Limited Means

An air force that is considered
by many experts to be the best in
the world, yet whose pilots are an
average age of 24, was shown on
NBC's "First Tuesday" documen-
tary series this week.
The program on the Israeli Air
Force, the IAF, was the result of
a month's filming in Israel. Pro-
ducer Bob Rogers had seen the
IAF in action during the Six-Day
War and was determined to find
out "what made these guys so
good."
Rogers found that "probably the
underlying factor that lets every-
thing else happen is a sense of
unity and determination. Building
on that, which is common to most
Israelis, as far as I can tell, and
certainly common to the armed
forces, the IAF has managed to
turn its very limited means into a
superb fighting force."
Again and again, the "limited
means" were shown—how some
of the aircraft, castoffs from
other national air forces, are
older than the pilots who fly it;
how young men of 16 voluntarily
start ground crew training with
complicated aircraft whose parts
are of two systems, American
and British; bow skilled work-
ers improvise in an emergency;
how each $3,500,000 Phantom
jet, paid for in hard cash, is
considered "a national treasure."
The program marked the first
time a non-Israeli journalist has
been allowed to film a jet squad
exercise in the air. The exact size
of the IAF and the graduating
class at the Israeli Flight School
are closely guarded secrets, ac-
cording to Rogers, but both are
small, emphasizing "quality over
quantity."
The pilots, considered heroes to
the Israeli people, are trained in
their "prime"—age 18. But by
that age they have had two years
of training as volunteers in tech-
nical school At an even younger
age, boys join the "Gadna Avir"—
Air Youth—in which they study
principles of aerodynamics and
other subjects.
It was pointed out that of 300
young men who are drafted, per-
haps "one good pilot" will emerge.
Only a small percentage of flight
school trainees ever graduate from
the tough curriculum; as a flight

or can Mrs. E. Stone.

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instructor put it, "We have the
biggest washout rate in the world."
He added: "We're not the happy-
go-lucky air force some people
think we are.... We're not much
on spit and polish ... but we are
disciplined."
As they begin training, it was
shown, the young men are im-
pressed with the great impor-
tance of their mission. They are
reminded of what happened in
Auschwitz, and what the sur-
vival of Israel means.
The air force is so small, it is
like a tightly knit family, said one
young pilot, who compared his
feelings upon completion of his
first mission to "having a Bar
Mitzva." The Israeli pilot, he said,
knows that the world "won't lift
a finger for us, so we must do our
best ... It is a hard way to live."
Rogers described the pilots as
neither cocky, complacent nor wor-
ried. "They are merely deter-
mined."

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This Week's Radio and
Television Programs

ETERNAL LIGHT
Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WWJ
Feature: "Easy to Be an Angel"
is a parable by Joseph Mindel of
the angel Abner who comes to
earth for a year to better under-
stand the temptations of man. This
is the last program in the anniver-
sary year series entitled "The Best
of the Eternal Light."
* * *
HEAR OUR VOICE
Time: 11:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WCAR
Feature: "Love Songs from the
Golden Era of Yiddish Theater"
features Jan Peerce and orchestra
conducted by Gershon Kingsley in
a collection of songs from the
theatrical world of 2nd Avenue in
New York. Cantor Orbach will
discuss the chosen selections.
* s s
COMMUNITY CURRENTS
Time: 7 a.m. Sunday
Station: WDET
Feature: "Esther Herlitz-Am-
bassador of the State of Israel to
Denmark" will be interviewed by
Evelyn Orbach, progr am and
broadcasting associate of the Jew-
ish Community Council.
• *
IN CONTACT
Time: 10:30 p.m. Sunday
Station: WJR
Feature: Man and religion are
placed "in contact."

*
HIGHLIGHTS
Time: 9:45 a.m. Sunday
Station: Channel 2
Feature: William T. Patrick, Jr.,
president of New Detroit, Inc.,
moderates a program on educa-
tion in the series "Equal Opportu-
nity." Featured will be Dr. Jesse
Goodwin, chairman of the educa-
tion committee of the NAACP, and
Mrs. Carol Campbell, manager of
the education department, Greater
Detroit Chamber of Commerce,
along with a participating audi-
ence.
• • •
LUBAVITCH JEWISH HOUR
Time: 8 a.m. Sunday
Station: WKNR
Feature: "Intergroup Relations"
will be discussed by Rabbi Yits-
chak Kagan; the roving micro-
phone visits the Lubavitch Youth
Center; and "Nyeh Zhuritseh,"
Hasidic melodies of Russian
origin, will be heard.

The latest edition of the Inter-
national Directory of Genetic Serv-
ices, published by t h e National
Foundation-March of Dimes, lists
566 service units—an almost 50 per
cent increase over the 1968 edition.

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