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January 16, 1970 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-01-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Policy Differences Aside, .S. Will elect Israel's Arm Needs

WASHINGTON — The sale of
1 S. Phantom jet fighter-bombers
and other arms to Israel will con-
tinue despite differences between
the two countries. according to
congressional sources.
America will remain Israel's
arms source because policy-makers
are convinced that an imbalance
would increase war risks. The
danger of American involvement
in a confrontation with the Soviet
Union in the Middle East is seen
minimized by adequate Israeli mili-
tary strength. A U.S. role cannot
only help deter Arab aggression
but also inhibit Israel from pre-
emptive warfare.
State Department officials re-
main enraged by Israel's charges
of "appeasement." Israel is con-
vinced that her hopes for a real
peace were undermined by the
State Department's concessions to ;
the Arabs and Russians at Israel's
expense. But higher levels of the
government view Israeli arms
needs in a different context.
President Nixon is expected to
approve a carefully limited por-
tion of the pending Israeli shopping •
list. It was submitted by Israeli
Premier Golda Meir when she

Greek Cleric Brands

Israel an 'Aggressor';
Tito Joins In Attacks

CARACAS (JTA) — A visiting
Greek Catholic church leader
launched into a polemic against
Israel after protesting to newsmen
that he was a "nonpolitical" per-
son and should not be asked "poli-
tical questions."
Former Msgr. George Hakim
of Ilaifa, now the Greek Catho-
lie Patriarch for the Orient,
branded Israel a "thief" and an
"aggressor." Hakim lived in Is-
rael for many years and was a
member of Ilistadrut. Ile now
lives in Damascus.
Hakim said Israel must he made
to observe the United Nations re-
solutions that followed the 1967
Six-Day War and return the
"usurped" territories. According to
the Patriarch, Israel has been
granted everything it has asked
in the last 20 years.
When asked about unfulfilled
international guarantees under
which Israel evacuated the cap-
tured Sinai peninsula in 1956.
Hakim said as far as he knew
"those promises were carried out."
Several newsmen observed that
his comments were "one-sided"
and unbefitting a spiritual leader.
Meanwhile, Marshal Tito of
Yugoslavia blamed Israel for what
he described as a "permanent war
being waged in the Middle East."
In an interview broadcast by
Zagreb radio, he claimed that
there was "no good will on Israel's
part" and no sign that Israel was
prepared to become more flexible.
It was Marshal Tito's second
broadcast attack on Israel in a
month.

Insufficient Funds Curb
Old City Construction

was a White House guest last Sc p- . further toward a nuclear option."
tember. She asked for additiona 1
The American problem was con-
Phantoms, other arms, and Ameri- . eluded to be finding a way "to
can help in financing the pur- provide Israel with an optimum
chases. It now appears likely that military force that is not so large
approval will eventually be given as to remove all constraints on
for some more Phantoms and other Israel, but sufficient to deter yet
weapons. The amount would he another premature and highly de-
limited with delivery scheduled stabilizing Arab offensive, and the
in monthly driblets to retain lever- inevitable Israeli response."
age to influence Israeli policies.
The number of Phantoms, Sky-
Without the new authorization,
hawks, tanks and other arms
Israel would in 1970 receive the
supplied to Israel would be linked
last of the 50 Phantoms ap-
to Israeli losses in the curent
proved last year. Although Israel
war of attrition and the level
has enjoyed a kill ratio of 4 to 1
and quality of Russian arms
or 5 to 1 of aircraft destroyed
given to the Arabs. "Though
since the Six-Day War, Israel
Israel can easily hold its own
has nevertheless lost in combat
against any combination of local
at least 15 planes of all types.
Another 15 may have been de-
stroyed in accidents. Since the
United States is Israel's only re-
ELECTRON IC
maining source of sophisticated
GARAGE DOOR
aircraft, the continuity of sup-
ply is of supreme importance.
OPENER
Israel's future may hinge upon
her airpower. The Mirage jets
that France refused to release
to Israel were built in fulfill.
ment of a contract signed sev- '
eral years ago. The 50 machines
would have cost slightly over
$1 milion each—a bargain for
Call Evenings Until 9
'military jets on today's market.
353-3284
Phantoms, reflecting inflated
American prices, cost about S4
million apiece.

Venzco

Congressmen who expect the
President to authorize new sales to
Israel do not anticipate new loans
to finance the transactions. They
cite the domestic "tight money'
situation and the inflationary pres-
sures restricting government funds.
It is possible that some way will
be found to ease Israel's defense
burden because of congressional
sentiment. But such an initative
well certainly not come from the
State Departmetnt and probably
not from the budget-concious White
House. Israel is the world's only
democracy threatened by Soviet-
supplied jets that has such diffi-
culties in Washington both in buy-
ing and financing American jets.

U.S. military policy toward Isra-
el is examined in a study entitled
"Dilemmas of the Arms Traffic"
in the new issue of "Foreign Af-
fairs," an American quarterly re-
view. Geoffrey Kemp, author of
the analysis, saw the issue as "how
to balance the need to preserve
Israel's security against the dan-
gers of a U.S.-Soviet confrontation
and continued bad relationships
with Arab countries." It was found
that "there are some compelling
reasons why, in the short run, the
most important U.S. policy ob-
jectives have been served by sup-
plying certain weapons to Israel,
and why it would he unwise to
deny Israel further suplies in the
hope that such restraint would en-
hance the prospects of a multi-
lateral political settlement between
the various parties to the conflict."

According to the analysis, "a
unilateral decision to delay or
withhold aircraft or spare parts
would stand the risk of tipping
the crucial balance of air power,
not necessarily in favor of Egypt,
Syria, Iraq, and Jordan, but at
least away from the present
clear superiority which Israel
enjoys. It can be argued that
as long as Israel remains the
dominant local airpower in the
Middle East, the likelihood of a
fullscale resumption of war is
lessened though not of course,
completely removed. If Egypt
became persuaded that it, rather
than Israel, could gain mastery
of the air in the event of an
all-out war, the temptation to
plan a major offensive cam-
paign against Israel would
grow."

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Insuffi-
cient government funding and diffi-
culties in expropriation of building
,ites were listed by Mayor Teddy
Kollek as the main reasons why
building plans in East Jerusalem
were six months behind schedule.
Reporting to the Knesset eco-
nomic committee, the mayor
blamed lack of funds as the main
reason for the delay in the area's
social and economic progress. Ile
urged both an increase in budgets
of government departments in-
volved in Jerusalem and a special
fund for the municipality to help
it handle "the great financial load",
which its new situation had im-
It added that "if Israel believed
posed.
hat this was a real probability,
He declared that the govern- it would prepare for pre-emptive
ment agencies still took the pre- a ction, and the stage would be set
1967 situation as the starting point fo r the fourth war." Foreign af-
for their consideration of Jerusa- ! fa irs warned that If America de-
Ian's needs, while the present situ- I n ied arms to Israel, the Israelis
ation required "a completely new w ould "redouble its attempts to
evaluation" of the city's signifi- b uild up its own arms industry,
cance and needs. a nd would almost certainly move

By MILTON FRIEDMAN

(Copy right 1970, JTA, Inc.)

Arab powers, success in battle Soviet moratorium of arms ship-
must be measured by the speed ments to the Middle East. America
with which it can overcome its 'would "probably have to continue
enemies," while the populous to sell Israel arms as a price for
Arab states can afford a pro- , not becoming involved in a war."
longed war, said "Foreign Af-
The concept of "tiping the bal-
fairs."
ance" in Israel's favor has an iin.
A "simple balance of power" portant adherent in Washington.
based upon pure parity was there- He is President Nixon who has, on
fore difficult for "Foreign Affairs" occasion, publicly espoused this
to imagine a meaningful American- I approach.

14—Friday, January 16, 1970

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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