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January 02, 1970 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1970-01-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Study Mission Pleads
for More UJA Giving

TEL AVIV (JTA)—Members of
the fourth United Jewish Appe a l
stedy mission of the current cam-
paign wound up a hectic week-
long tour of Israel convinced that
their principal message to Ameri-
can Jewry is that there must be
increased contributions to meet
Israel's "urgent" needs.
The group members, headed by
Joseph D. Shane of Los Angeles,
honorary national chairman of the
LJJA, set the ball rolling by in-
creasing their own pledges by 300
per cent.
Shane, a tennis enthusiast, spon-
sors the Joseph D. Shane trophy
awarded annually to the outstand-
ing Israeli tennis player. He is
behind a project to build 40 new
tennis courts in Israel and a tour-
nament stadium in Ramat Can.
An international committee of
tennis stars is administering a
special fund to build the courts
and to train promising Israeli
players abroad.

When one loves one doubts even
what one most believes.
—La Rochefoucauld.

A nnounconents

Dec. 24—To Dr. and Mrs. Mel
vyn M. Friedman (Susan Benson)
3168 Greenfield, Royal Oak, a
daughter, Cynthia Elyssa.
*
Dec. 20—To Mr. and Mrs. Barry
Kriger, former Detroiters of
Brooklyn, a son, Joel.
* * s
Dec. 17—To Mr. and Mrs. New-
ton B. Bernstein (Shirley Beit-
man), 5444 Centerbrook, Birming-
ham, a daughter, Juliie Anne.
* *
*
Dec. 15—To Mr. and Mrs. Ste-
ven N. Klein (Linda Neshkes),
4485 Kenneth, Okemos, a son, Dan-
iel Martin.
* s *
Dec. 14—To Mr. and Mrs. Law-
rence Schiff (Judith Sukenic),
16349 Harden Cir., Southfield, a
son, Scott Michael.
▪ * *
Dec. 6—To Dr. and Mrs. Irving
Weingart (Elaine Wechsler), 25506
Shiawassee, Southfield, a daugh-
ter, Susan Michelle.
* * *
To Mr. and Mrs. Stanford L.
Ducker (Joanne Wolovits), 21911
Vale, Oak Park, a son, Michael
Alan.

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, January 2, 1970-27

Israel Probes Bus Ambush That Took
e of Touri Summer -Warned
dst.Hot

11-

•f

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Israeli
authorities are investigating the
fatal ambush of a bus last Satur-
day carrying American tourists.
One man, identified as Leon Holtz.
48. of Brooklyn. was killed.
The bus was returning to Jeru-
salem from the Negev when it was
fired on near the village of Dura
in the Hebron area. Holtz, hit in
the chest. was rushed to Hebron
where he died in an Army hospi-
tal.
The area of the attack is under
a dusk-to-dawn curfew. The at-
tack occurred at 5 p.m. local time.
shortly before sunset. Israeli au-
thorities ,aid the bus should not
have been in that vicinity at the
time.
The bus driver. David Danziger,
apparently took a shortcut over a
little frequented route in order to
get out of the curfew area before
dark.
Holtz was traveling with his

wife, Esther. She was taken to
Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem
for treatment for shock. No other

passengers were injured. Mrs.
Holtz was informed of her hus-
band's death by Minister of
-Tourism Moshe Kol. She said
this was their first visit to
Israel, a trip her husband had
been planning for 20 years. The
couple left their 14-year-old son
at home. They arrived in Israel
Dec. 25.
Israeli authorities said the at-
tack was the first on a civilian ve-
hicle in the Hebron area in two
months. Previous attacks have
been made against trucks carrying
Israeli sightseers and against pri-
vate automobiles. Holtz's death
was the second American fatality
in Israel, due to enemy action.
Last June, a California teacher
was killed in a rocket attack near
the Dead Sea.
Defense Minister Moshe Dayan
warned Israelis to brace them-
selves for an intensification of
Arab warfare on all fronts next
summer. He cautioned against
"premature satisfaction" with the
apparent failure of the Arab sum-
mit conference at Rabat, Morocco.
Gen. Dayan said the Arabs
would continue to build up their
military strength and increase the
pressure against Israel. He said
the Egyptians had been promised
more military equipment from
Russia, but he was confident of
the Israel Army's ability to main-
tain its position of strength along
the Suez Canal and every other
front.
Gen. Dayan also warned the
Lebanese government to expect
heavy retaliatory blows from Is-
rael if it did not take action to
curb terrorist activities from Leb-
anese soil. He said Beirut should
take cognizance of the blasted
towns and villages on the Egyp-
tian side of the Suez Canal and
the Jordanian side of the Jordan
Valley and "learn their lesson"
accordingly.
He noted that the Lebanese
border differed from the others
in that there are no natural bar-
riers such as the Suez Canal or
the Jordan River.
Gen. Dayan said that attacks
from Jordan on Israeli settlements
in the Beisan and Jordan valleys
caused very few casualties among
civilians because of the extensive
network of shelters.
However, he conceded that
there was no way to prevent hit-
and-run raids by terrorists who
move along Jordanian roads and
fire a few Katyusha rockets. He
said to seal off Israel from such
attacks, a defense line would
have to be maintained 20 miles
inside of Jordanian territory.
Gen. Dayan said Israel aircraft
have dropped hundreds of tons of
bombs on Egyptian positions along
the Suez Canal since last Thurs-
day, which should convince the
Egyptians that they will not be
able to cross the canal next sum-
mer.

An Israeli commando raid 'that

destroyed an Egyptian naval posi-
lion 115 miles south of the Suez
Canal last Friday night was hailed
as one of the "cleanest and most

daring" operations ever carried
out by Israel's armed forces. The
praise was offered by the chief of

an Israeli military spokesman. He
said all of the planes had returned
safely to base and that "nothing
was shot down."

Israeli troops involved was not
disclosed. But the target was ap-

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parently regarded by the Israeli .
high command as of considerable
importance.
The raid was the first in which
Israeli commandos were support-
ed by the Israel Air Force. Jets
blasted nearby Egyptian positions
in sharp diversionary attacks be-
fore and during the raid drawing
enemy defenses away from the
target area.

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The commandos achieved al-
most complete surprise, a mili-
tary spokesman said. They were
not spotted by Egyptian sentries
until they were 30 yards from

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their goal. A brieg gun fight en-
sued in which there were no Is-
raeli casualties. The four Egyp-
tians captured were reported to
have feigned death or wounds.
Cairo radio conceded that the
raid took place and said Egyp-
tian forces lost two men killed
and four missing.
Israel warplanes battered tar-
gets along a 65-mile sector of the
Suez Canal last week in an eight-
hour raid aimed at complete de-
struction of surface-to-air missiles
previously knocked out by Israel
and rebuilt by Egypt. It was the
longest air attack since the June
1967 war.
Other targets of the sustained
aerial assault included artillery
positions and radar posts. Israel
had announced previously that an
Israeli campaign which started
Sept. 9 had wrecked virtually all
of Egypt's defenses against air
assaults along the canal, leaving
the canal front wide open to any
Israeli action.
An Egyptian claim that four of
the attacking Israeli planes had
been shot down by anti-aircraft
fire was called "pure fantasy" by

West Bank Exports High

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Have An Affair to Remember

staff, Maj. Gen. Haim Bar Lev,
who greeted the raiding party
when it returned to base with four
Egyptian prisoners.
The target was Ras Ghareb, 115
miles south of Port Suez at the
canal's southern entrance, and
10 miles inland from the shores of
the Gulf of Suez. The number of

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FOR THE

JERUSALEM (JTA)—More than
200,000 tons of agricultural produce
valued at $28,600,000, were export-
ed from the West Bank to Jordan
and other Arab countries during
1969, the West Bank military com-
mand annouced.
The produce was transported
over bridges in motor trucks
driven by Arab residents of the
West Bank. The military command
announced also that 2,500,000 trees
have been planted this year in the
Judaea-Samaria districts.

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PAINTINGS

Private party, recently moved into smaller home from Palmer

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temporary, traditional (no abstracts). Purchased over period

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$400 each. Sell at half my cost. Prefer to sell all to one

party or dealer. Phone 647-8213

(after

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Specializing in Formal Attire

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