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December 12, 1969 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MOVIE GUID

Jackie Gleason In

Wk. Nights 6:15, 8:15, 10:15
Sat. & Sun. 12:15, 2:15, 4:20, 6:20,
8:20, 10:15

By AMOS BEN-VERED

Wk. Nights 6:25, 10:15
Sat. B. Sun. eve. 7:00, 10:30
plus Paul Newman in

"HELLO DOLLY"

"HARPER"

Starts Dec. 17

s E
e n f .5. 1 0 d 6 . 343
d.a ;i
02n blks... W
Strictly Adult Entertainment
Christopher Jones, Yvette Mimieux

ATLAS

"3 IN THE ATTIC"

WK. NIGHTS 7:15, 1:05 Sat. & Sun.
5:45, 8:55.
Plus

Wk. Nights 8:15 only
Sat. a Sun. Eve. 5:00, 8:40

Sat. Sun. Spec. Kiddie Matinee
Open 11:30 "8 ON THE
LAM" S.
"FITZWILLY".
M a in •t - li Mile
6K
LI2 018
Held Over 4th Big Week

MAIN, ROYAL 0

"BUTCH CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID"

"CHASTITY"

only Sat. a Sun.

Plus Lucille Ball in

"YOURS, MINE & OURS"

BERKLEY

12 Mile-Coolidge, LI 2-0330
Held Over 4th Big Week
David Niven, Deborah Kerr in

"PRUDENCE & THE PILL"

Mon. thru Fri. open 6:45,
Shown 7:00, 10:20
Sat. eve. re-open 6:45, Shown 8:55
Sun. open 1:30, shown 3:35, 7:05, 10.25.

Sat. & Sun. SPEC. MATINEE
"THE MAGIC SWORD" & "DON'T
RAISE THE BRIDGE LOWER THE
RIVER".

Mon: Fri. 8:35 only, Sat. eve. 7:00, 10:25
Sun. 1:40, 5:10, 8:35
SAT, SPEC. CHILDREN'S MATINEE
ALL SEATS 50c
Opens 1:00 starts 1:20 over 4:45
Jerry Lewis in "THE BIG MOUTH"
plus "THE PERILS OF PAULINE"

Birmingham-MI 4-3533
S. Woodward at Maple
Carol Baker In

Birmingham

"BABY DOLL" (R)

-

REDFORD

L a 2s56r
ne
KE 7
0 e F Gan
rer eg
Parking
a °
EXCLUSIVE AREA 1ST RUN
Final Week!
Robt. Mitchum, Geo. Kennedy

Robt. Redford

"BUTCH CASSIDY
& THE SUNDANCE KID"

Wk. Nights Open 5:45, shown 8:15 only
Fri. open 6:30, shown 9:10 only
Sat. open 12:45, shown 1:05, 4:40, 8:15
plus Paul Newman in

Wk. Nights 6:05, 9:45, Fri. 6:45, 10:40
Sat. 3:35, 7:10, 10:45, Sun. 2:35, 6:10, 9:45
315 WLI F;a 2 6 ■ 1112i, R.O.

ROYAL OAK

James Garner in

"MARLOW"

FRI. 9:00, only SAT. 5:30, 9:00, SUN.
1:10, 4:30, 8:00. WK. NIGHTS 8:00 only.
Pl us Rod Tayl or i n

"THE LIQUIDATOR"

Mon. thru Thurs. 9:25 only
Fri. & Sat. 6:15, 10:25
Sun. 2:00, 6:05, 10:10
plus Paul Newman in

"WINNING"

Mon. thru Thurs. 7:15 only
Fri. S. Sat. 8:15 only, Sun. 4:05, 8:05.
Starting Fri., Dec. 19 - James Bond
"ON HER MAJESTY'S
is back in
SECRET SERVICE".

W'ward 2 bliks;41. l MI.
i- 6006
FINAL DAYS!
Last Performance Dec. 21st at 7 p.m.
WINNER OF 6 ACADEMY AWARDS
incl. BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR

BLOOMFIELD

FRI. 7:15, 10:35, SAT. 3:45, 7:05, 10:35,
SUN. 2:40, 6:05, 9:35. WK. NIGHTS 6:15,
9:35.
Starting XMAS DAY
'THE ARRANGEMENT"

;DOw114.T

ADAMS

EVES. Mon thru Sat. 8 P.M.
EVES. SUN. 7 P.M.
reserved.
All
Matinees Wed. Set. a Sun. at 2 p.m.
Box office open Wed. Sat. & Sun. 1-9
Box office open
Mon. Tues. Thur. Fri. 4-9
Starts Dee. 25th

• WI

Grand Circus Park

Free Parking after 5 p.m .
WO 1-8525
Robt. Mitchum, Geo. Kennedy,
Tina Louise in

"THE GOOD GUYS AND
THE BAD GUYS"

11:15, 2:55, 6:40, 10:20
Paul Newman in

"HARPER"

"OLIVER" (G)

12:55, 4:40, 8:20

Wed. Ladies Day - 75e

FOX

2211 Woodward-WO 1-9494

The film that defies every taboo

"I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE"

Pius . . . They were made for love

"THE DIRTY GIRLS"

"GOODBYE MR. CHIPS"

CAMELOT W.

"HARPER"

"THE GOOD GUYS AND
THE BAD GUYS"

"DON'T DRINK THE WATER"

Paul Newman,

"THE GOOD GUYS AND
THE BAD GUYS"

Prymouth Rd.
at Farmington Rd.
GA 7-0400 8. KE 4 - 6400
Robt. Michum, Geo. Kennedy

AMERICANA :4:4
4 "67: Greenfi351-3V20

EVERY WED. LADIES' DAY

at Miller Road
581.50 4e

"ONCE YOU KISS A STRANGER"

WK. NIGHTS 6:25, 10:00, SAT. 6:20,
10:00, SUN. 3:45, 6:20, 10:00.

"THE GREAT BANK ROBBERY"

LATE SHOW Friday and Saturday
For Schedule Information Call WO 1-7917

GRAND CIRCUS

t tart.ra\V
id0 C1i-r3TZ
5 Hrs. Free pkg. After S p.m.-Anytime
Sunday
You must be 18 years old to see

WK. NIGHTS 8:20, only Sat. 4:40, 8:20,
Sun. 2:30, 4:40, 8:20.

"CARMEN BABY" (X)

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, December 12, 1969-39

EVERY WED. LADIES' DAY

12:35,

3:50, 7:10, 10:25

"I, A WOMAN" (X)

11:05, 2:20, 5:40, 8:50

EMPRESS
GARDEN

Coming for Xmas "THE REIVERS"

Specializing in Cantonese Cuisine
In Harvard Row Shopping Center at
11 Mile and Lahser Rd.
Open Mon. through Fri. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m.; Sun. Noon-10:30 p.m.
356-4750
Orders To Take Out

VIKING
SMORGASBOIII)

DOWNTOWN DETROIT'S ONLY SCANDINAVIAN SMORGASBORD
ENJOY GRACIOUS CONTINENTAL DINING

LUNCHES • DINNERS
CLOSED SUNDAYS & HOLIDAYS

Cadillac House
Motel

520 W. Congress

Radio+ Metzger 'TT i

erv,
the

presents

SPAN

Io

la

A. ig,.

filltairle"
rugs Fig

ccoma II MOWN

this season because of illness,
Gillman remains with San Diego
as general manager. He led the
Chargers to five divisional and one
AFL championship. Gillman com-
piled a 192-102-9 record in his 25
years as a head coach.

In 1930-32 the Big Ten had a
standout pair of backs in Harry
Newman of Michigan and Charles
"Buckets" Goldenberg of Wiscon-
sin. Goldenberg played profession-
al football for 13 years, mainly as
a guard, and was recently named
to the NFL's All-1930s team. New-
man, a quarterback, was a unani-
mous All-America first team
choice in 1932 when he led the
Wolverines to a 8-0-0 record and
the national championship. He
played in the pros for five years.

With Aaron Rosenberg at
guard in 1931-33, the University
of Southren California lost but
two games. The Trojans com-
piled a 30-2-1 record that Includ-
ed two Rose Bowl, victories and
a national championship. A first
team All-America in 1932-33,
Rosenberg today is a top motion
picture producer and a member
of the College Football Hall of
Fame. He was recently named to
the second team on the All-Time
College Football squad selected
by the Football Writers' Associa-
tion of America.

An end at Brown in 1931-32.
Frank Meadow earned third team
All-America honors in his senior
year. No Bruin player has received
that high rating since. Ed Kahn
performed at guard for North
Carolina in 1932-34 and with the
pros in 1935-37. He served in the
Marines during World War II and
in 1945 was killed in action in the
Philippines.
Fullbacks were brilliant in 1934,
especially in Pennsylvania. Izzy
Weinstock played for Pittsburgh in
the 1933 Rose Bowl Game, and the
following year made first team All-
America. He played three years of

Hashomer Hatzair Hears
Calls for Refugee Aid

Lebanon: Israel 's 'Quiet Border'

NOW

WO 1-7917

most work outside of the region, in
the Huleh valley or in the Haifa
Bay industries.

(Copyright 1969, JTA, Inc.)

JERUSALEM - Israel's border
with Lebanon is known as the
"quiet border." The description is
relative. During the first 11 months
of this year there have been 12
mining incidents, three thefts. four
Katyusha rocket attacks, 18 shoot-
ings, three mortar shellings and
13 acts of sabotage which damaged
:culverts, bridges and houses. But
according to people who know,
this is what can happen in a week.
or in a single day, on the Suez
Canal front.

Security demands that each set-
tlement deputize a sizeable num-
ber of its members for security
purposes. All roads are paved, In-
cluding the sidelancs to orchards,
in order to prevent mine - laying-
At night, the settlements are lock-
ed and huge searchlights illumin-
ate their perimeter fences which
are watched from several vantage
points. A double fence with elec-
tronic devices and mine fields is
being built along the border. There
are bomb shelters all over and the
roofs of houses are re-enforced to
reduce damage from shells. Set-
tlers say the border is most quiet
when Lebanese forces are fighting
it out with guerrillas. When there
is peace between them, the inci-
dence of violence along the border
increases sharply.
The road along which the news-
men traveled is considered safe by
day or night. At some points it is
separated from Lebanese territory
only by a ditch a few yards wide.
At one point, a group of Israeli
Arab workers from Upper Galilee
were seen repairing a bridge that
had been sabotaged a few months
ago. They were being watched,
from behind bushes some 50 yards
away. by Lebanese soldiers.

A group of foreign newsmen
were taken on an all-day tour of
the "quiet border." The first thing
that strikes one is its isolation
from the main Israeli population
centers. The section visited con-
tains 28 settlements. But there is
not one decent road to the rest of
Israel. As a result, industries are
I not attracted here as there are to
many other rural areas of the
country.

i

The tour was organized by

Keren Hayesod in Jerusalem,
the fund-raising branch of the
Zionist movement, and was led
by its president, Rabbi Israel
Goldstein. The Keren Hayesod
expects to collect $90,000,000
from Jewish communities all
over the world, excluding the
United States, during the present
fiscal year. It will spend 820,-
000,000 in the next five years
strengthening and improving set-
tlements in the Lebanese border
area.
There are some thriving kibut-
zim and rnoshavim (small holders
settlements) in the region, but
there are others in dire need. like
Dovev and Avivim. There, immi-
grant families from the Atlas
mountains of North Africa live on
a bare subsistence levti on an in-
come of $100 a month provided by -
social welfare payments. Some
earn a little more from part time
work. Families of eight to 12 chil-
dren live in tiny quarters, often
two or three children to a bed.
The settlements in this region
have many problems apart from
their isolation. The terrain is
mountainous. Water for irrigation
must be pumped some 1,500 feet
up from Lake Huleh which is at
sea level. Sonic of the settlements
are only half populated and sonic
are occupied by such unseemly
institutions as a fencing . school.
•' Many of the native born young-
sters have left for other parts of
Israel. Of the second generation
moshav members who remain

NEW YORK - More than 300
in the
participating
delegates
seventh biennial national confer-
963.2390
ence of Americans for Progres-
sive Israel here heard Simha Fla-
sive
0
I;1_17_= -I I pan, leader in the Mapam Party,
El
call for Israel to initiate a con-
structive policy to aid 500.000 Arab
refugees living in the occupied
tACIIGER Presents
areas.
Another speaker, David Gelber.
managing editor of "Liberation"
magazine,
who recently visited Is-
Dirty
rael, Jordan and Lebanon. said that
Israel's Arab population must be
given full equality in reality, not
only on the statute books. Ruth
Grunzweig, founding member of
FILMS ReleaSe
Defense Loan Supported
the Jewish Liberation Project, ans-
os
JERUSALEM (JTA) - The gow-
wered that Zionism is the national
1,0
liberation movement of the Jewish eminent has announced that the
for ADULTS!
people and should be so recog- ;voluntary' internal defense loan for
1969 has been oversubscribed. The
nized by the. Left.
Moshe Kagan, member of the target figure was 587,000.0(X) but
Actions Committee of the World subscriptions so far amount to
Zionist Organization, was re-elected $107,000,000. The law authorizing
INFORMATION
national chairman of Americans ithe Bank of Israel to set a maxi-
for Progressive Israel - Hashomer ! mum of $105,000,000 probably will
PRE(PARKING
have to be amended.
Hatzair••

YOUR HOST
LEIB
ROSENBERG

.

By JESS SILVER

(Copyright 1969, JTA,

With more football scholarships pro ball. Another fullback who
America choice. Goldberg was a
available in the 1930s, an even turned professional, Dave Smuk-
great defensive star in the pros
greater number of Jewish players ler, was a third team All-America
for eight years. His is a member
found places on All-America teams. choice at Temple in 1934. A 60 - min-
of the College Football Hall et
Fame.
Gabriel Bromberg of Dartmouth ute performer in the first Sugar
was third team All - America selec- Bowl contest, Smokier was recent-
A somewhat less publicized back,
tion at guard in 1931, while Mau- ly named to the new Temple Uni- Sid Luckman, played fin- Columbia
rice "Mush" Dubofsky of George- versity Hall of Fame.
at the same time Goldberg was
town, rated honorable mention at
First team All-America guards appearing with Pittsburgh. Luck-
the same position the following appeared at Alabama and Cornell man was just as brilliant, but with
year. Today, after a long career as in 1937 and 1938. Leroy Monsky a far less talented group of help-
high school coach, Dubofsky is captained the Crimson Tide to a ers. He was a third team All-
head coach of his alma mater's 9-1-0 record in 1937, and A. Sidney America in 1937, and a second team
club football team.
Roth played in the East-West game choice the following year. Luck-
Another future head football after a sensational season with the man of course went on to great-
ness with the Chicago Bears, and
coach, Sid Gillman, starred at end Big Red in 1938.
One of the College football's is a member of both the College
for Ohio State during the same
most highly publicized backs and Pro Football Halls of Fame.
period. An honori.ble mention All-
came on the scene at Pittsburgh
Although he wasn't an All-Amer-
America in 1932-33, Gillman began -
in 1936. Marshall Goldberg led ican, we can't forget Art Gottlieb
his coaching career at his alma
the Panthers to a victory in the of Rutgers. Gottlieb lifted Rutgers
mater in 1934. Ile served as head
1937 Rose Bowl and a national to a 20-18 victory over Princeton
football coach at Miami of Ohio
championship that same year. A in 1938 on a fourth-down touchdown
and Cincinnati before moving to
first team All-America at half- pass with just five minutes to play.
the pros in 1955. He was head
back in 1937, Goldberg shifted to It was Rutgers' second triumph
coach of the Los Angeles Rams
fullback in Pitt's Dream Back- over the Tigers. The first had oc-
until 1959 when he shifted to the
field and the following year was curred in college football's initial
Chargers.
a unanimous first team All- contest in 1869.
Forced to retire from coaching

MAI KAI

NEIGH BORHOODi

WK. NIGHTS 8:50
7:15, 10:25.

Amon., Noted Food )a11 Stars - the 1930s

1

Singer's 'Estate'

.

By JACK SIEGEL
(A Seven Arts Feature)
Isaac Bashevis Singer's "The
Estate" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
is about Polish Jews.
Reading "The Estate" is like
taking a tour of another man's
large family. If you have not fol-
lowed their chronicles from an
earlier stage, they become mostly
names. Singer's hook "In My
Father's House" was, for me. a
much more successful one. With
it I could identify even though it
was of a time and distance for-
eign to my own. What made the
continuity was the tale of history
woven in your own home about
olden times. In "The Estate, it is
hard to identify people, especially
in the beginning.
Singer writes an old tale of other
times in a clipped prose. In the ,
beginning, this is effective. He
carries you forward on the move-
ments of his people. I say his peo-
ple because he seems to know
them. I didn't. But as you get to
the end of the book, this method
of rapidly moving people around,
gets wearisome. It also becomes
melodramatic. And you find you
don't care too much about them.
This discovery makes you feel
guilty because Singer is a man Of
literary repute but even his Amer-
ican sequence in the book is de-
scriptive rather than deep. You
can't fault the translation because
much of the prose is good, the dia-
logue terse and even accurate.
Some of his philosophical reflec-
tions, in Judaic matters, are like
asides. They ruffle the book.

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