100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 22, 1969 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-08-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Israel de-
manded through the International
Red Cross Wednesday that Egypt
return Maj. Nissim Ashkenazi, 30,
an Israeli pilot who was captured
after his jet fighter-bomber was
shot down by Egyptian anti-aircraft
fire near the Suez Canal Tuesday.
Maj. Ashkenazi was flying an at-
tack mission against Egyptian ar-
tillery which had been shelling
Israeli positions on the canal's
East Bank near Al Shatt. An Israeli
civilian was killed in the barrage.
He was identified as Shimon Zar-
fatti, 35, a father of four. An
Israeli soldier. 22-year-old Moshe
Sahrawi, was killed Tuesday by an
Egyptian sniper near Kantara.
Another soldier was wounded by
a sniper Wednesday morning.
The Israeli demand for the re-
turn of Maj. Ashkenazi was handed
to an IRC representative to for-
ward to authorities in Cairo. But
an Egyptian communique claimed
that the Israeli pilot was seriously
injured and was undergoing treat_
ment in a hospital. His fellow
pilots who saw him bail out, said
they were astonished by the re-
port. They said they saw Maj.
Ashkenazi land safely on Egyptian
soil after ditching his burning
plane and that he was standing on
his feet which he could not have
done if he were seriously wounded.
They said he might have been
injured by Egyptians after they
captured him.
It was noted here that Israel
holds an Egyptian pilot of equal
rank who bailed out of his SU-7
bomber over Israeli-held Sinai
recently. It is possible that he
will be exchanged for Maj.
Ashkenazi, sources here said.
The Suez Canal front was rela-
tively quiet during Tuesday night
except for sporadic fire from the
Egyptian side. But two Israeli
army patrols were attacked in the
northern Golan Heights and near
Kuneitra. They returned the fire
and suffered no casualties.
El Arish, the largest township
on the Sinai peninsula, was placed
under curfew Tuesday night after
attacks on nearby Nahal Sinai and
on the El Arish airstrip with
Katyusha rockets. Several hundred
local residents were questioned by
police.
An Israeli soldier was killed
by an Egyptian sniper along the
Suez Canal Monday, and Israeli
units killed six Arab saboteurs
in separate encounters Monday
night and Tuesday morning in
the Jordan Valley and the Gaza
Strip.
The latest casualty in the canal
zone was Pvt. Sayid Franco. He
was killed near the spot where 2nd
Lt. Herman Mordecai lost his life
Monday when explosives planted
by Egyptian commandos damaged
a water pipeline. A military
spokesman said the Egyptians
were trying to knock out the fresh
water pipelines supplying Israeli
troops on the canal's East Bank.
The damaged pipe has been re-
paired. A recent Israeli air raid
damaged a fresh water pipeline
linking the Nile with Port Said,
and the Egyptians have since
made two retaliatory attempts
against the Israeli water supply,
the spokesman said.
He reported that three saboteurs
were killed and 12 captured in a
dawn skirmish with Israeli police
near a Gaza refugee camp. One of
the dead saboteurs was wanted
for the murder three weeks ago
of Shimon Levi, an employee of
the Israel public works depart-

ment. Levi was found shot to death
in his car near a road construction
site. Two of the captured sabo-
teurs were wounded.
Three other saboteurs were
killed Monday night in a clash
with an Israeli patrol along the
Jordan River near Mandassah
Bridge. One Israeli soldier was
slightly wounded in the exchange
of fire while the saboteurs were
attempting to cross the river.
Several bazooka shells were
fired Tuesday morning at an Is-
raeli patrol south of Kuneitra in
the Golan Heights. Another patrol
came under bazooka fire in the
northern Golan Heights. Fire was
returned in both instances and no
casualties were sustained by the
Israelis. No casualties or damage
was reported. An explosive charge
went off near the military gover-
nor's house in Bethlehem Monday
night without causing damage or
casualties. It was the second ex-
plosion in Bethlehem in two days.
The first one slightly damaged the
labor exchange office there.
Eight Arab saboteurs were
killed over the week-end in
skirmishes with Israeli patrols.
The Israeli units suffered no cas-
ualties, a military spokesman
reported. One of the guerrillas
was killed Saturday night north
of the Damiya bridge in the Jor-
dan Valley. Five were killed Fri-
day night near Shaar Hagolan in
the Beisan Valley where they
were setting up Katyusha rocket
launchers, apparently to attack
nearby Israeli settlements. Three
members of the gang escaped
but one of them is believed to
have been wounded. Two sabo-
teurs were killed Friday night
in the Arava desert area south
of the Dead Sea.
Thirteen Israeli Arabs and three
from the Gaza Strip living in Tira
village were detained for question-
ing Saturday following an explo-
sion that damaged a poultry shed
in Mar Hess Friday. Police dogs
brought to the scene picked up a
trail that led to Tira, many of
whose Arab residents work in
nearby Israeli settlements.
In other fighting, an Israeli bor-
der policeman was injured Satur-
day when his patrol was fired on
from Lebanese territory near Mal-
kiyeh. Several mortar shells were
fired Sunday at the banana planta-
tions of Ashdod Yaacov in the
northern Beisan Valley. Two ba-
zooka shells were fired from Syr-
ian territory early Sunday at an
Army post in the northern Golan
Heights. A woman was slightly
injured Saturday when a bomb
exploded on a crowded beach at
Herzliya.
A military spokesman disclosed
that a cache of 150 mines, 50 hand
grenades, explosives, Katyusha
rockets, rifles and machine guns
was discovered last week north of
Ein Gedi near the Dead Sea.
Arab commandoes made their
second raid in 10 weeks on the
Haifa oil refinery complex Aug.
14, setting explosions that dam-
aged a crude oil pipeline and a
high-tension power line. Fire-
fighting units quickly extin-
guished a blaze touched off by
one of the blasts. The electric
power pylon was not damaged,
although the raiders managed to
cut some wires. The wires were
repaired within a few hours.
The damaged pipeline is one
which leads from the refineries to
the crude oil terminal near the
Haifa port. An explosive charge
was placed near a control tap and

after it was detonated, some oil
leaked from the break. Repair was
started immediately. Eight Arabs
were arrested in the initial stages
of the police investigation. All but
two were released Sunday. The two
still in custody were both seen in
the area under suspicious circum-
stances before the explosion oc-
curred. One of them, an Israeli
Arab from Galilee, said he had
been invited by a contractor to
work in the area but had gotten.
lost and wandered in the vicinity
of the refineries.
In Washington, United States
officials carefully followed reports
of the latest Israeli air strike
across the Suez Canal. Official
Washington is interested because
of the possibility that Soviet tech-
nicians and members of the Soviet
armed forces are manning the
complex electronic and radar
guidance equipment at the missile
site hit by Israeli planes. Accord-
ing to sources in Washington, the
Israeli jet downed earlier in the
day was hit by an S.A.M.2 missile
of more advanced design than the
"flying telegraph poles" fired at
U.S. pilots over North Vietnam.
(U.S. authorities acknowledged
that the presence of Soviet mili-
tary advisers and technicians in
Egypt represented a potential
source of escalation crisis. How-
ever, the information available to
the U.S. government was said to
indicate that Soviet personnel have
limited their activity to troop
training. It was conceded that
some of the "training" might be
in progress at anti-aircraft posi-
tions along the Suez Canal.)
One hundred and fifty Arabs
were detained for questioning
in the aftermath of two explo-
sions in a Jerusalem suburb
which slightly injured a number
of boys.
The first explosion occurred an
a residential building adjacent to
a busy commercial center in
Kiryat Yovel; the second an hour
later among trees in the same
neighborhood. The injured young-
sters were part of a crowd that
gathered after the first blast. They
received first aid treatment but
none required hospitalization. Most
of the Arabs detained are from
the occupied territories, police
said. The suspects include a num-
ber of women.
Premier Golda Meir and De-
fense Minister Moshe Dayan
told separate audiences here that
Israel is capable of contending
with the present situation in-
definitely. Mrs. Meir, addressing
a luncheon of the Foreign Press
Association, said Israel can with-
stand the harassing guerrilla
war waged against her by the
Arabs because there is no other
way. But, she said, the present
situation is not as grave as the
one that prevailed on the eve of
the Six-Day War. She said Israel
does not want a new war and
the Arabs know that they can-
not achieve results by all-out
war against Israel.
Gen. Dayan spoke to the Mont-
real leadership mission of the
United Jewish Appeal. He said
Israel could bear up against the
pressure on all fronts for a long
time to come. He said that what
worried Israel was not so much
the presence of Soviet advisers in
Egypt or the fact that they are
training the Egyptians in the use
of modern weapons. Israel's con-
cern, he said, is that the Russians
are advising the Egyptions on tac-
tics and strategy.

NEW CADILLAC?

SEE or CALL.

ANDY BLAU

WILSON-CRISSMAN CADILLAC

1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM
RES. 642-6836
CALL BUS. MI 4-1930

AUGUST CLEARANCE.

LOWEST PRICE EVER . . .

$167

4 F 1,9Installation
At Low Cost

THERMO-KING AUTO-AIR CON-
CON-
DITIONER. YOU CAN BE SURE
WHEN IT'S

SOL ' S

SECURITY
CHARGE CARD

AUTO-AIR CENTER 0 ° w=

CALL: 532-1097

WE SERVICE
ANY CAR AIR
CONDITIONER

24750 FIVE MILE RD.

COME ON IN AND WE'LL HAVE COFFEE AND CONVERSATION

iir**********************
*
*
4( HARRY THOMAS
*
*
FINE CLOTHES FOR OVER 35 YEARS
*
*

: FINAL
CLEAN-UP

• le *

*

SA..1!i

*

WE COMPLETELY DISREGARD COST

AND OFFER FAMOUS MAKERS TROP-

ICALS AS WELL AS YEAR ROUND

SUITS AT REDUCTIONS THAT DE-

MAND INSTANT ACTION.

ORIGINAL FEATURED PRICES

$95 to $150

NOW $69.50 - $79.50 - $89.50

All Sizes All Models
All Hand Tailored

3 BUTTON IVY — 1 BUTTON-
CONTINENTAL — 2 BUTTON -
SHAPE — DOUBLE BREASTED
NOW $69.50—$79.50—$89.50

HARRY THOMAS

15200 W. 7 Mile Road

5 Blocks East if Greenfield, Corner Sussex

Open Daily 9:30 to 6
SUNDAY 11 A.M. to 4 P.M.

MICH. BANKARD — DINERS — SECURITY

ii-***********************

JEWISH
NATIONAL
.FUND
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL FOR ALL OCCASIONS

OFFICE HOURS: MON. THRU THURS., 9 to 5; FRIDAY, 9 to 4

Friday, August 22, 1969-15

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Israel Asks Red Cross Arrange Return
of Pilot Shot Down by Egyptian Fire

Classifieds Ads Get Quick Results

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
22100 GREENFIELD RD.
OAK PARK. MICH. 48237

PHONE 399-0820

CLOSED SUNDAY

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan