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July 25, 1969 - Image 25

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS i r im
"

ur Eddie,' New
Ish-Kishor
Story
Detroiter Reunited With Israeli

26—Friday, July 25, 1969

Sister After 31-Year Separation

In 1938, Simon Goldman and his
sister, Esther. left Mannheim, Aus-
tria. and had not seen each other
for 31 years.
Last week they were reunited.
Esther, now the wife of Asher
Ariav, came here with her husband
and their daughter, Idith, 18, for
the long-awaited reunion.
The Ariays were on their way
backback home to Israel where
Ariav will resume his teaching post
in El Yachin, near Hadera.
For the past three years
Ariav was an exchange teacher in
Melbourne. Australia.
Esther left for Palestine. Her
husband came there a year later
from Vienna, became a farmer and
during the influx of immigrants into
Israel. he resumed the profession
he followed in Austria—teaching.
Goldman left for Denmark an ,"1
when the Nazis sought to round
up the Jews for shipment to con-
centration and extermination camps.
he escaped, with 8,000- other Danish
Jews. to Sweden. He came to De-
troit in 1949.
The Ariays were the guests of the
Goldmans. who reside at 2211
Church St.. Oak Park, during their
brief Detroit visit.
Ariav, who taught high school
in the Melbourne Jewish Day
School. said there is great enthu-
siasm for Israel in Australia.
There are five Jewish day schools
w ith student bodies totaling 2,000

l "

• • .

• 1.,:• ■

Youth
News

2nd Summer Session
to Begin Tuesday

Registration is still open for
many of the Jewish Center's sum-
mer programs. Second session ac-
tivities to begin Tuesday include
Playland, Day Camp, Summerland,
Funtine. Safari '69, Sports Skills
Camp, Pioneer Camp and Camp of
the Arts.
New arts and crafts activities,
more swim time (with instruction)
and other program innovations have
been added for the second half of
the summer for children from kin-
dergarten age to high schoolers.

Tips Tops, a daily drop-in pro-
gram for first - through - sixth
graders, will continue through
the second session. First through
third graders will tour the De-
troit Zoo Tuesday. Fourth, fifth
and sixth graders will spend an
overnight at Camp Tamarack,
July 31-Aug. 1.

To culminate the first period's
activities, the Camp of the Arts
division will present "Fine Arts
Festival" 1 p.m. today. The camp-
ers will demonstrate the skills they
have been developing during the
first session. There will be an art
exhibit and stage productions by
the music and dance divisions, all
in the Aaron DeRoy Theater. Ad-
mission is free.
Second session students will pre-
sent their own festival at the con-
clusion of the summer. .
For information about summer
programs, call group services, DI
1-4200. Brochures are available.

They Made
The Grade

MICHAEL KURLAND of Detroit
was one of 95 young Americans,
aged 18-25, who recently left on the
one-year Sherut La'am tour in Is-
rael. Upon arrival, the partici-
pants will study Hebrew for three
months, after which they will be
sent to various parts of the coun-
try to serve in the specific pro-
fessional capacities.

in Melbourne, he stated. He said
concern over mixed marriages and
assimilation has created a spirit of
devotion among parents who seek
to give their children a better Jew-
ish education.
Teachers in the day schools'
general department are mostly non-
Jews while most of the Hebrew
teachers are from Israel. he said.

Israel Govt. Housing
State's Top Landlord
for New Immigrants

By HAIM SHACHTER
JERUSALEM — Amidar Housing

Co., established jointly by the Is-
rael government and the Jewish
Agency for the purpose of erecting
and administering housing mainly
for new immigrants. is Israel's
biggest landlord.
In 1968. 70,000 families — about
one-third the total number of Jew-
ish families living in rented prem-
ises in the country—occupied hous-
ing administered by the Amidar Co.
The majority of these families
arrived in the country after the
establishment of the state. Seventy-
four per cent hailed from Africa
and Asia: 25 per cent from Euro-
pean countries.

Generally, families occupying
Amidar housing are larger than
the countrywide average: they
consist of 4.8 person per family
as compared with 3.8 in the aver-
age Jewish family in Israel.
Hence, the density of population
in Amidar housing (2.1 persons per
room) is higher than the country-
wide average of 1.6 persons per
room. The average monthly rent-
al per family amounted to 25
pounds (57.25) per flat, and con-
stituted about 5.6 per cent of thi:
family income.

The annual income per wage-
earning family in Amidar housing.
is about 6,480 pounds ($1,879) as
compared with 9.650 pounds (52398)
for the general Jewish wage-earn-
ing population.

State Fair Announces
Senior Citizen Awards

Its time to enter the competition
for the two Senior Citizen Awards
to be presented by the Michigan
State Fair. E. J. (Jeff) ) Keirns,
general manager, said that entry
blanks and guidelines have already
been sent to over 450 senior organi-
zations throughout the state.
One award will be given for out-
standing leadership in the organiza-
tion of senior citizen groups and
activities and one for the senior
citizen who has given outstanding
community service during the past
year. The two winners will be se-
lected by a committee of directors
of senior citizen groups. The
awards will be presented on Old
Timers Day. Aug. 25.
Nominations are to be made
through a senior citizen organiza-
tion. Anyone who believes he is -
qualified may contact his local
organiaztion and ask that a nomin-
ation be submitted. All entries must
be sent to the State Fair by Aug. 8.
The new competitions, Amateur
Fine Arts and Sculpture, have been
added to the Fine Arts Division of
the Michigan State Fair.
The State Fair opens Aug. 22, and
continues through Labor Day, Sept.
1.

Club's Weekend Activity
i to Be Held in Southgate

A summer weekend at the Presi-
dential Inn in Southgate is being
planned by Parents Without Part-
ners for Aug. 8 - 10. The group's
activities will include a cocktail
hour on Friday, with Mel Ravitz.
; Detroit Common Councilman, as
guest speaker. Also featured will
be a dinner-dance Saturday.
Other Parents Without Partner
groups will be attending from
Chicago, Pittsburgh, Toledo and
Toronto. For information, call Hen-
, groups will attend from Cleveland,
rietta Lewis, LI 6-0903.

Sulamith Ish-Kishor is known for
many of her children's books,
many based on Jewish historical
facts and on legendary back-
grounds, like her "Boy of Old Pra-
gue."
In her newest children's book,
"Our Eddie." published by Pant-
heon Books. Miss Ish-Kishor deals
with the realities that face immi-
grants.
First there are the struggles and
the family difficulties in London.
Then there are the New York ex-
periences where the head of the
Raphel family dedicates himself to
Hebrew studies and to Zonism.
One hears so often about the
mother-child complexes in Jewish
literary creations that this book is
a departure: it is the constant
quarreling between father and
children and especially with Eddie
who is not well, who does not get
along with the papa, who has an
ambition that is thwarted and
whose death ends the father's as-
piration to have him settle in Pal-
estine.
It's a story filled with bitter
feuds and is a revealing narrative i
about immigrant struggles.
It is also a story of stubbornness
that is often unaccountable. Filled
with action it does reveal situations
that depict a family often in dis-
cord.

4th Auschwitz Trial Set to Open in Frankfurt

BONN (JTA) — A fourth "Aus- freed on recommendation of doc-
chwitz trial" will open soon in tors.
Frankfurt, it was announced here.
Two public prosecutors have visited
Every family has prize kin. —
Warsaw, Posen and Cracow to in- E. W. Howe.
terview 19 witnesses.
The defendants are six low-rank-
FOR THE BEST IN
ing former officials of Auschwitz
MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT
death camp and one ex-kapo, an
inmate member of the camp police.
Many kapos were Jews. The iden-
And. His Orchestra
tity of the one to face trial at
358-0938
Frankfurt was not disclosed, nor
the exact date when the trial would

SAM EMMER

begin.

The prosecutor's office also an-
nounced that Josef Windek, 66,

who was sentenced to life imprison-
ment at the third Auschwitz trial

in Frankfurt last summer, had been

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Grossman 'Jackdaw' Series

LONDON, Ont. (JTA) — Three
members of the Canadian National
Socialist Party picketed a Jewish
merchant's store here, carrying
signs reading "Are Jews Privileged
(???) Persons?" the Canadian Jew-
ish Congress reported. Two of the
pickets identified themselves as
"party chairman" and "London
district party secretary." The third
was a 14-year-old boy.
Police ended the picketing after
;some 15 hecklers gathered. Store
owner Meyer Fink refused to com-
ment to avoid "giving these people
any kind of publicity."

Basic Books Published
Conway's Expose of Nazis

"The Nazi Persecution of the
Churches, 1933-45," by Prof. John
S. Conway was published by Basic
Books, 404 Park Ave. S., New
York. The publisher's name was
inadverently omitted from the re-

, view in last week's Jewish News.

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Nine separate titles in the "Jack-
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received enthusiastically
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schools, libraries and parents who
found the colorful folders, the
careful reproductions, the infor-
mative broadsheets both useful as
teaching guides and attracitve as
presents.
On March 26 Grossman Publish-
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Jewish Store Owner
Picketed by Neo-Nazis

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Never before has so much prim-
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Business
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Through a regrettable error last
week. ANDY BLAU was listed as ;
being associated with the wrong I
company. He is associated with the
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