100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

June 27, 1969 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

yeg- w-L.

Velie's Fact-Filled Volume on Mid East Status

Lester Velie, a roving correspon-
dent for Reader's Digest, having
covered the Israel scene with a
thoroughness that affirms acquisi-
tion of an intimate knowledge of
Israel's affairs, aims, military
accomplishments and internal re-
actions, has pro-
duced a work
that adds im-
measurably to an
understanding of
the Middle East
situation.
In "Countdown
in the Holy
Land," published
by Funk and
Wagnalls. Velie
portrays the situ- Velie
ation to indicate the Russian in-
volvement, the American position,
the state of horror that evolved out

of the threats to destroy the Jew-
ish state and the form into which
the resistance and the defense had
developed.
The contacts he had made
with Israelis, his interviews with
the citizens of the embattled
state, his having gone to the root
of the problems to become
knowledgable about the entire
Middle East situation, has con-
tributed towards the production
of a significant analysis of one
of the gravest issues of the cen-
tury.
A typical example of the manner
in which Velie approached the en-
tire subject is his coverage of the
struggle for the Golan Heights and
his deeply moving report on what
had happened at Gadot.
"The Children of Gadot" is a
classic chapter outlining the strug-

Summer Interns in
Unconcerned About Israel

By MILTON FRIEDMAN

(Copyright 1969, ./TA. Dm)

WASHINGTON — Hundreds of
summer interns have arrived here
from the nation's finest universities I
bringing attitudes of apathy, bore-
dom and indifference on the issue
of Israeli security.
The selected three-month appren-
tices do not appear to reflect the
anti-Israel views of the Student for
a Democratic Society (SDS) and
other leftist extremists, some of
whom are pro-Arab. They seem to
be intelligent, well-mannered, neat
and attractive boys and girls who
have come from colleges and uni-
versities in all 50 states to learn
about their government.
Since the interns will work not
only in the offices of Congressmen.
but also the White House and key ,
federal agencies. their views may
be instructive. It is easy to estab-
lish that the fascination with Israel
that existed in June 1967 has evap-
orated in two short years.
To some extent, a spirit of uco-
isolationism may be spreading.
But concern about Vietnam re-
mained evident. Vietnam directly
affects the lives of the young, the
draft for some, ideological hang-
ups for others.
Two lovely young women from
Midwestern universities said Israel
was "in" two years ago but now
was "out.
Faces lit up when other issues
were raised. The military-industrial
establishment? Black power? Vio- ;
lence? The crisis of the cities?
Humanizing the new mass society?
Making institutions "relevant" to
human needs? Troop withdrawal
from Vietnam? All these questions
drew quick interest.

MAC-0-lAr

AMERICAS

PAINT

ONE-COAT FINISH

Fadeless
Colors

Odorless
Non-toxic

No-Drip
Scrubbable

Clean up
with water

$ 49

ow

gal.

COMPLETE SATISFACTION
OR YOUR MONEY BACK

ONE-COAT FINISH

Whitest white
Non-fading
color

Mildew
Resistant

Peel
Resistant

Clean up
with water

gal.
$ 6 69

We are proud!

More Detroit paint dealers sell
Mac-O-Lac than any other
brand.

But Israel and even the new
Palestinian Arab "liberation"
causes were dismissed with a
shrug. The borendom elicited by
the two sides was, at least,
evenhanded-
Israeli Embassy Minister Simcha
Dinitz, a witty and gifted speaker,
recently addressed students at a
number of U.S. universities. His
findings tended to coincide with
impressions gained from this
summer's Washington interns.
Dinitz was invited not long ago
by the University of Minnesota.
Considerable advance publicity was
given to the lecture. But of the
24,000 students, only 100 showed up.
Mr. Dinitz later estimated that the
100 included:"about 60 Arabs, 10
Israelis, 20 If.S. Jews and 10 Chris-
tian -youths who may have wan-
dered in by mistake.
The Arabs had agitated on the
campus. Huge placards proclaim-
ing the terrorist cause were dis-
played. "Long live El Fatah," said
the signs. But the student body in
general couldn't care less—whether
about the Arab protest or the
scholarly Israeli presentation.
Even the students of foreign
affairs who hope to become diplo-
mats are bored. The School of In-
ternational Affairs at Georgetown
University in the Nation's capital
inviteh Dr. Fayez Sayegh. the well-
known Arab propagandist. An esti-
mated 70 attended. Of this number
perhaps 60 were Arab students and
the rest were Israelis.
The university wanted to present
a balanced lecture series so it in-
vited Minister Dinitz a few days
later. This time the same 10 Is-
raelis came but only about 30
Arabs showed up.
There is obviously no sense of
crisis among the American univer-
sity students on the Middle East
issue. The Arabs and radical left-
ists have failed to generate inter-
est here on the current impasse.
The Israelis have recited Israel's
stand so often that the average
American student is tired of listen-
ing.

Queen Honors Six Jews
on Annual Birthday List

LONDON (JTA) — Queen Eliza-
beth's annual birthday list awards
honors to several British Jews.
Knighthood was bestowed upon
Prof. Nikolaus B. L. Pevsner, art
historian, for services to art; Dr.
Ernst Boris Chain, biochemist, edu-
cator and Nobel Prize winner, who
helped in the discovery of penecil-
lin; and Julian Salmon, a director
of the Lyons Catering Firm, for
Services to the catering industry.
Harold Lever, member of Parlia-
ment and financial secretary to the
treasury, second in rank to the
chancellor of the exchequer, be-
came a member of the Privy Coun-
cil. Life peerage was given to Sir
Sidney Bernstein, chairman of
Granada Film and Television, a
commercial network.
Samuel Golydman, second secre-
tary of the treasury, was made
Knight Commander of the Order of
the Bath, which, like knighthood,
carries the title of Sir.

gle of a Jewish settlement, con-
. stantly under attack, consistently
fired upon, the children having
lived in bunkers, constantly shel-
1 tered from attacks.
It is not only the relief that
came with the conquest of the Gal-
! an Heights and the acquired seen-
' rity that emerges from this drama-
!
; tic story, but also the description
; of the battle itself—the manner in
which the Israeli soldiers managed
to get to the heights to conquer the
unconquerable.
Bulldozers were used to re-
move boulders that blocked the
paths on the hillsides. Tanks fol-
lowed, a number were destroyed,
there were casualties, but the ob-
jective was reached. The objec-
tive was to capture Tel Fager.
The Syrians were stunned. The
cost was high: "31 Israelis kill-
ed and 78 wounded-108 casual-
ties to take a position held by
100 men. But, with the capture
of the neighboring Tel Azaziat,
the way was open to the larger
conquest of Golan Heights."
And the triumph represented ful.
fillment of a promise to the chil-
dren of an acquisition of freedom,
of security, of the right to move
about without hindrance.
This is a typical account in a well
compiled narrative of the Arab-
Israel war. The book's significance
lies, however, primarily in the
description of how the Hot Line
worked between Washington and
Moscow, how the Russian threats
were warded off, the constancy
with which President Johnson lab-
ored to prevent an all-out war in
which this country would have
been embroiled with the Russians.
Every aspect of the involved
struggles is dealt with and Velie
also turns to the question of nu-
clear war threats, the Israeli
atomic piles at Dimona and Na-
ha! Sorek, the research at the
Weizmann Institute, and other
activities in the advancement of
science in Israel.
"Israel's scientists have devel-
oped a military electronics indus-
try so advanced that it holds a
subcontract for producinug the
radar equipment for the French
Mirage jet," Velie reports.
He points out with regard to Is-
rael's refusal to sign the nuclear
nonproliferation treaty that India
would not sign, that. like Israel,
Brazil and Italy did not sign.
"As a result," he writes, "ex-
perts who before the Six-Day War
felt that India would become the
next member of the nuclear club
(the U.S., USSR, Britain. France
and Red China), now believe that
the next member will be Israel."
"As far as galloping prolifera-
tion is concerned," Velie con-
cludes, "it is one thing for a big
nation such as India to break
the self-imposed atomic prohi-
bition; it is another for a small
nation like Israel to do so. 'Is.
rael, one of the world's smallest
nations would wreck the protocol
of inhibition far more effectively
than a big nation (India) would,'
a London School of Economics
authority (Philip Windsor) has
warned.
"The Soviet Union's global
war tactics in the Middle East
could plunge the world into the
atomic proliferation a g a i n s t
which the Kremlin has been
piously preaching. And the Mid-
. die East, which gave birth to
three major world religious,
could be the burial ground of
civilization."
Even if there is disagreement,
Velie's views are presented with
precision, the volume he has writ-
ten indicates understanding of a
grave situation. It was written by
a good observer. "Countdown in
the Holy Land" is a thought-pro-
voking as well as a splendidly
chronicled volume.

HELP KEEP AMERICA
STRONG

INVEST IN

U. S. SAVINGS BONDS,
FREEDOM SHARES

18—Friday, Jess 27, 1969

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWSS

Arms Spectacle in Middle East

By MILTON FRIEDMAN
(Copyright 1969, JTA, Inc.)
WASHINGTON — The world may
soon witness the spectacle of Amer-
ican jets shooting each other down
in the skies over Israel and Jordan.
The jets will be manned, of course,
by Israelis and Arabs.
Under a program initiated by the
Johnson administration, the U.S.
Air Force is commendably fair and
even-handed. At an airbase in Cali-
fornia, Israelis are being taught to
evade and destroy the F-104s.
Meanwhile, at an airbase in Flor-
ida , the Arab F-104 pilots are learn-
ing how to intercept and destroy
aircraft intended for Israel.
Air Force officers have suggested
jokingly that it might be fun to let
the Arab and Israeli-piloted U.S.
jets just fight it out over Cuba
instead of having to go all the way
to the Middle East. Maybe Holly-
wood would finance the venture.
The sad fact is that Israel is now
totally dependent on the U.S. for
high performance military jets.
The election of Georges Pompidou
as Gaullist president of France in-
dicated to some observers that
Gen. de Gaulle's embargo on

BAERWALD WERP

French Mirage V jets for Israel
would continue.

Washington is not supplying Is-
rael with jets and crew training
because of zionist sympathies in
high places. The military strength
of Israel is deemed to be in the
national security interest of the
U.S. The Phantoms were sold only
because of the Soviet jets given to
the Arabs and the Kremlin's at-
tempts to penetrate the Middle
East and outflank NATO.

Another factor in the American
decision is the effort of Arab ter-
rorists, inspired by Peking, to turn
Israel into a second "Vietnam."
Washington does not need another
"Vietnam" in the Middle East or
anywhere else. This helps explain
the U.S. desire to avoid involve-
ment while providing Israel with
deterrent military capabilities.

Look Sharp, Be Sharp
With Clothing and Ac-
cessories From

MORIS HUPPERT

CUSTOM EXTERIOR &
INTERIOR PAINTING

HARVARD ROW MALL
11 MILE & LAHSER

REFERENCES — FREE ESTIMATES

OPEN THURS. & SAT 'TM 9

626-1855

FOR SALE - RESTAURANT,
DELICATESSEN, BAKERY

Doing over 5500,000 volume. Net profit in access of 10% of soles.

Some owner, some location over 23 years_ Owner wishes to retire.
Located on a major thoroughfare in the affluent suburban area of
Minneapolis, Minnesota. Modern equipment in a fine air conditioned

building, large parking lot. Excellent national reputation, good fran-

chising

possibilities.

CALL 1-612-WA 7-8844 OR WRITE, BERNARD HOROVITZ, 4212
W. LAKE ST., ST. LOUIS PARK, MINN. 55416

FE 8-9222

Detroit LI 9 6161

SPARTAN DODGE

-

SELLS FOR LESS

(Tell Us If

We're Wrong)

BE A DODGE FEVER BELIEVER

GEOPGE RUSKIN

President

855 Oakland Ave.
Pontiac, Mich.

N

SPEED?

Good Quality?

When Printing a Newspaper,
Large or small
Publishers Need Both .. .

POST'S winning combination of Hot Type composi-
tion and Letterpress Printing is the "time-proven"
answer. From page proof "OK" to "on press" is
minutes, not hours. POST also offers the most
versatile line of Offset Printing in the Midwest.

Printers of The Jewish News for over a Quarter Century

MIMES

PRINTING COMPANY

1442 BRUSH • DETROIT • 962-3703

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan