100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 23, 1969 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Cincinnati Students Voice
Interest in Agency Work David Halberstam's No teworthy Work: Robert Kennedy's 'Odyssey'

CINCINNATI (JTA)—Most mem-
bers of a group of Jewish students
Interviewed at the University of
Cincinnati indicated that they or
their Jewish friends would be in-
terested in serving in Jewish com
rnunal agencies.
The study. made by a committee
of the Jewish Federation of Cin-
cinnati, was undertaken to learn
the needs of the Jewish students;
the services which might be offer-
ed them by focal Jewish communal
agencies and the relations between
those agencies and the Hillel Foun.
dation at the university; and the
Views on student needs of key ad-
ministrative and faculty personnel,
as well as those of Protestant and
Catholic fellowship organizations
On campus similar to Hillel. The
Study consisted of in-depth inter-
Views with a representative sam-
pling of 42 undergraduates.

What is and how does one treat
an "odyssey"? David Halberstam,
Pulitzer Prize winner, member of
the New York Times staff, quotes,
as a prefix to "The Unfinished
Odyssey of Robert Kennedy," pub-
lished by Random House, this defi-
nition from Random House Dic-
tionary of the English Language:
"Odyssey: . . . A long series of
wanderings, esp. when filled with
otable experi-
nces, hardships,
c."
It is a realistic
ay of explain-
ng a text that is,
ndee d, filled
th accounts of
ontroversies, ex-
riences, de-
ates, trials and
tribulations, as-
pirat i o n s, con-
tests for office,
Robert Kennedy etc., etc•

`Jewish Power" 4Pride, Identity)
Goal of New Activist Group

LOS ANGELES (JTA) — Four
students at Los Angeles City Col-
lege and California State College
of Los Angeles have announced
formation of "Concerned Jewish
Youth" as an activist force in the
interest of the Jewish community
but' rejecting any affiliation with
the organized Jewish community.
An announcement of the organ-
ization's establishment said its im-
mediate objective was "the build-
ing up of Jewish pride and a Jew-
ish identity, based on our culture,
history and heritage which are
rooted in Israel and the diaspora."
The announcement expressed
Concern that "many efforts of
Jewish youth have been misspent
on movements which will in the
end be directed against us as
Jews."
In its first public declaration,
the organization criticized young
Jews who support radical move-
ments that condemn Israel as
"imperialistic and genocidal"
and encourage Israel's enemies.
It said it is as "hard to under-
stand how Jews can still support
radical movements and not raise

NYANA Reports Aid
to 3,200 in Past Year

NEW YORK (JTA)—The New
York Association for New Amet
cans, which aided 3,200 Jewish
newcomers to settle in New York
In 1968. provided agency servkes
to 1,672 in the first four months
of this year. Howard M. Harris.
NYANA president, reported to its
annual meeting here Monday.
Of these, he said, nearly 1.000
required full settlement and relief
services. including housing. ini-
tial maintenance, medical and den-
tal care, family counseling and
youth services. In all of 1968, 1,206
required such services.
The increased number of arriv-
a/9 for settlement here was attri-
buted by Harris to increasing anti-
Semitism in some Eastern Europe
and Arab countries. Many of the
refugees, he said, arrived here
Without funds or possessions and
required immediate financial as-
sistance
During the first four months
of 1969, it was reported, the
NYANA vocational services de-
partment aided nearly 800 new-
comers with job counseling.
training, placement and intensive
English language courses. Mr-
. jag the same period, 240 schol-
arships were granted as against
213 in all of 1968.
Harris noted, that while initial
Settlement costs had risen sharply,
the period of dependency had
Loon dramatically. In 1949. the
average family was dependent on
the organization for eight or more ,
months. Today, he said, the aver-
age is less than three months.
Harris was re-elected to a sec-
ten'. as PVSsickel.14
.

their voices against anti-Zionist
(really synonymous with anti-
Jewish) statements as came out
of the National Conference for
New Politics."
It asked how Jews could "sup-
port a movement that demands as
one of its goals ethnic quota sys-
tems in all the institutions of
American society." The declara-
tion asserts that "the Jewish radi-
cal should know that he is in a
middle position and that he is be-
ing used. Anti-Semitism has been
used in countless societies in which
there has been social change and
upheaval and revolution."

Halberstam fulfills his task mag-
nificently, reviewing the Bob Ken-
nedy career, his political activi-
ties, his differences with President
Johnson.
There is a noteworthy reference
to the Jewish community, and the
author who views the odyssey as
applied to the martyred Senator,
brother of the martyred Presi-
dent, states:
"He liked power, and he looked
like he liked power, and many
of the liberals, particularly the
Stevensonians, drew back from
power; there was something in-
herently evil in power. For the
liberal intellectuals, many of
them Jews, it was almost an eth-
nic thing—he looked too Irish-
Catholic for them; they believed
him more like his father than
his brother; and they remained
uneasy with him. Their defection
hurt him the most. He had gone
through it all once before, wear-
ing a yarmulke all over New
York City, sensing the strength
of their distrust, but finally win-
ning their votes if not their af-
fection.
"Now in the campaign the Jews
were retaining all the old suspi-
cions, and this hurt him. Again
and again with friends (at times,
half of his advisers seemed to

be Jewish) he would ask why it
was happening and they would
try to explain . "
How evident that the Halber-
stam work is a recapitulation of
politically historic events, laying
stress on conditions of our time, on
the thinking of the many elements
in the American population and
the Kennedy attitude!
This odyssey is a significant
work by a very able reporter who
understands our time, the politi-
cians, the men in and out of office
—and especially the Kennedys.

THE DETROIT JEWISH HEWS
Friday, May 23, 1969-17

Verywo ELECTRONIC

GARAGE

DOOR

OPENER

Call Evenings Until

9

353-3284

FOR THE FINEST IN

JEWELRY

FREDRICK JEWELERS

OF BLOOMFIELD

869 WEST LONG LAKE ROAD, BLOOMFIELD HILLS

OPEN THURSDAY EVENINGS

646-0973

NEW CADILLAC?

SEE or CALL

ANDY BLAU

i

WILSON-CRISSMAN CADILLAC

1350 N. WOODWARD, BIRMINGHAM
CALL BUS. MI 4-1930
RES. 642-6836

"MAXIM® IS A COFFEE MECHAYEH!"

Reform Union Eyes
Task Force' for
U rban Crisis

-

NEW YORK (JTA)—An "emer- '
gency task force of Reform Juda-
ism" to determine how Reform
Jewry can be "more meaning-
fully involved and more effec-
tively active in the urban crisis .
of our country" will be estab-
fished by the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations by decision
of the board of trustees.
The decision was taken by the
hoard at the closing session of
its semiannual meeting here. Earl
Morse. chairman of the board, will
head the task force which is to
report back to the board in the
fall.
The resolution warned Jews "not
tto over-react to isolated incidents"
of black anti-Semitism nor to con-
demn the entire black community
for extremist acts. The resolution
stressed that "We must never lose
sight of our moral imperatives to
increase our efforts to resolve
the underlying injustices in our
society."
A warning that "moderate,
constructive and responsible"
students will be driven further
toward the revolutionary camp
unless the adult conununity
learns to trust youth was served
on the board by Marvin Braiter-
man, director of education and
research of the UAHC religious
action center in Washington.
A 19-year-old Harvard sopho-
more, Sanford F. Borins, of To-
ronto, told the board that "hard
and honest application of religious
values" was essential if there was
to be any hope of bridging the
generation gap.
He said his generation needed
the guidance of "men of religion
who can criticize both our goals
and the means we use to achieve
them." He asserted however that
"religion's role in a revolutionary
time will not win it any friends."

Danes, Finns in Maccabia
Denmark will send a squad of 40
athletes to the eighth World Mac-
cabia games in Israel. Finland
will be represented by four ath- 1
letes.

MAXIM'S SECRET?

IT'S A REVOLUTIONARY
KIND OF COFFEE!

Perfectly percolated coffee is
quick frozen. Then the ice is
removed under a vacuum, leaving
concentrated crystals of real
perked coffee—freeze dried coffee!

AN EXPLOSION OF
TASTE AND AROMA!

That's what happens the moment
you add hot water. Those golden
brown crystals burst into
deliciously fresh coffee—just
like perking it in your cup!

A NEW LOVE FOR COFFEE LOVERS

One taste is for keeper

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan