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April 25, 1969 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

32—Friday, April 25, 1969

AJCommitee Finds Catholic Heads
to Be Sympathetic to Israel Cause

The study, prepared by Mrs.
Judith H. Banki of the AJCom-
mittee's interreligious affairs de-
partment, noted that "on the
whole, Catholic leaders and the
sympathetic toward Israel than, official diocesan press are more
are Americ - n Protestant denomi-1 sympathetically disposed to Is-
rael and more likely to balance
nations.
The results of the survey were
their specific criticism of Israel's
based on a study of the public posi-
behavior with parallel criticisms
tions of Catholic and Protestant
of the Arab nations.

WASHINGTON (JTA) — A sur-
vey by the American Jewish Com-
mittee has found clerical and lay!
leaders of the Roman Catholic
Church in America to be more I

leaders following Israel's reprisal
raid on Beirut Airport last Dec. 28
after a terrorist attack on an El
AI airliner at Athens two days
before.

Redstone Directs
Architects' Show
on Michigan Week

The Michigan Society of Archi-
tects has prepared, as its contri-
bution to Michigan Week, an ex-
hibit featuring the work of Michi-
gan architects, planners and land-
scape architects based on the
theme "Planning for the Future of
Michigan."
Chairman of the statewide com-
mittee for the exhibit is Louis G.
Redstone.
The exhibit, entitled "Man-
place." will open with a reception
at the Detroit Institute of Art, May
21. After a three-week showing, the
exhibit will travel to all major
cities in Michigan.
Included in the exhibit will be
new urban developments re-build-
ing of old neighborhoods, new cul-
tural educational recreational and
commercial development and stu-
dent work from the four achitec-
tural schools in Michigan as well
as projects by the Detroit Planning
Commission and the Detroit Hous-
ing Commission.

The official Protestant press—
and the statements of most Prot-
estant institutional leaders — have
been less favorably disposed to
Israel and have seen the plight of
the Arab refugees as the overrid-
ing issue in the Middle East and
have placed primary responsibility
for the plight of the refugees on
Israel.
The AJCommittee findings
showed that official Catholic state-
ments have called on both the Is-
raelis and Arabs to negotiate dir-
ectly with each other.
Leaders of the National Council
of Churches, the Protestant Coor-
dinating body, wired their grati-
tude to former President Lydon B.
Johnson and former Ambassador
J. Russell Wiggins for the United
States' condemnation of Israel's
Beirut raid, the study noted.

Egypt Joins Other
Arab States Lifting
Travel Restriction

JERUSALEM—Israel Minister of
Tourism Moshe Kol informed the
Christian Science Monitor that
Egypt has added its name to- the
list of Arab countries which have
quietly lifted the ban on tourists
with Israeli visas stamped on
their passports.
Kol said he found this out from
tourists who had taken advantage
of the change in Egyptian regula-
Dayan Says Arabs Are
tions and from "various other
in No Position for War sources."
The Jewish News reported on
TEL AVIV (JTA) — Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan said that April 11 that Lebanon and Jordan.
possibly,
Syria, had dropped their
the Arabs might try to "heat up"
the frontiers this summer but were bans, according to the Lebanese
not in a position to launch an all- consul general in Detroit.
All of the Arab countries named
out war. Gen Dayan spoke in an
Independence Day interview on the cited drastic declines in tourist
army radio. He said the Arabs traffic as the reason for the
might try a surprise attack on change.
Israel airfields but added, do
not think they will succeed."
Gen. Dayan said the Four Pow- Soviet Jewry to Be Aired
er talks on the Mid East were un- by French Intelligentsia
dertaken on the assumption that
PARIS (JTA) — A number of
the threat of renewed warfare was France's outstanding intellectuals,
serious and observed that "it is writers and artists, including some
not impossible that the Arabs, es- identified with the extreme left-
pecially Egypt, are really trying to wing, will attend a conference
create such a picture."
opening Thursday on the plight of
But he thought Egypt's presi- Jews in Soviet Russia. The con-
dent, G a m a l Abdel Nasser, ference will be held under the aus-
would not go beyond the talking pices of a group of French writers
stage of his March 27 threat to and philosophers who organized
bomb and shell Israeli civilian nine years ago to keep tabs on the
centers..
situation of Russian Jewry.
Gen. Dayan also disputed Col.
Among those who will attend are
Nasser's contention that time was Nobel Laureate Prof. Rene Cassin;
working for the Arabs. He said Is-i Mayor Gaston Deferre of Marseil-
rael's security forces faced a four- ; les, a former presidential candi-
fold task: day-to-day security, ; date; former Premier Pierre Men-
manning the cease-fire lines, fight- des-France; the novelist Francois
ing guerrillas and administering Mauriac; the artist, Pablo Picasso,
occupied territories. and the French Protestant leader,
Pastor Westphal.

Honor Levin for Holocaust Works; 'Diary' Acclaimed

NEW YORK—A special citation
for "excellence and distinction in
literature of the Holocaust and
Jewish destiny" has been awarded
to Meyer Levin by the international
jury of the Remembrance Award
Committee of the World Federation
Associations,
of Bergen-Belsen
whose New York chapter held its
anniversary liberation meeting
April 15 at the Regency Hotel. The
jury members, acting for the sur-
vivors of Bergen-Belsen, included
Saul Bellow, Abraham Heschel, Al-
fred Kazin, Joseph Kessel, Primo
Andre
Levi, Maurice Samuel,

Schwartz-Bart and the chairman,
Elie Wiesel.
Meyer Levin is cited for his
works on the Holocaust, which in-
clude "In Search," "My Father's
House," "Eva," "The Fanatic"
and "The Stronghold." The citation

16th Century Synagogue
Restored in North Italy

ROME (JTA) — A 16th Century

647-2367

The
Sheldon Rott
Orchestra

LI 7-0896

Socialites Set Social,
Raise Funds for Israel

Detroit Socialites will hold its
next social event 9 p.m. May 10 at
the Berkley Masonic Temple,
where the G and G orchestra will
play for dancing. Refreshments
and social mixers will be on the
program, to which the public is
invited.
At a recent auction, Detroit
Socialites raised funds for its sec-
ond gift to the Israel Emergency
Fund.

martin j. wail
photographer

3411 • 9787

"

!

Larry F reedman

COVILLE

-

Ctialetsia.)

Levin's original dramatization of
the Diary, which Herman Shumlin
offered to produce, was barred on
a claim that it was "unstagewor-
thy"; eventually producer Kermit
Bloomgarden commissioned Holly-
wood authors Frances and Albert
Hackett to write the Broadway ver-
sion, which won the Pulitzer Prize
but which some critics found to
be superficial, particularly in Jew-
ish content. In stage structure
both plays were similar enough
for a jury in the New York State
Sureme Court to find there had
been considerable appropriation of
Levin's work. To avoid further liti-
gation Levin settled for the moral
victory and payment of his legal
costs of about $17,000, and then
turned over to Otto Frank all rights
to his own play, urging that it
would thenceforth by allowed pro-
duction, at least for educational
purposes.
In 1967, the educational Israel
Soldiers Theatre presented "Anne
Frank" with Levin's permission
alone. Critics called it more faith-
ful to the Diary, and "infinitely
superior" to the Broadway version,
but attorneys for the Broadway
play had it closed down.

S

The conference's standing com-
mittee said in a public declara-
tion that despite slight improve-
GENEVA (JTA)—Jewish schools ments, Soviet Jews still suffered
operated by Ozar HaTora in Mor- from serious social and cultural
occo and Iran were discussed at I discrimination and lacked all
a meeting here Monday between normal educational and cultural
officials of the Joint Distribution facilities granted to ethnic min-
Committee headed by Louis D. orities by the Soviet constitution.
Horowitz and directors of Ozar (In Buenos Aires, following a
HaTora which the JDC has sub- three-day seminar on the plight of
Jews in the Soviet Union, Jewish
sidized for the past 20 years.
The organization was founded students established a University
in' 1944 to provide religious edu- Committee for the Defense of So-
cation for Jewish communities in viet Jews. They said the commit-
North Africa and the Middle East. j tee would seek to inform Argentine
The Ozar HaTora reported that public opinion on the cultural and
4,000 Jewish children and youth I religious repression of Jews in the
attended its 15 schools in Iran Soviet Union and to press for per-
in Morocco linissioilMe ttews destrtngjo;kvs0, • "
thet

.•••••

.

Levin on the subject of a 17-year
controversy: "We feel the spirit
and presence of your work, par-
ticularly your memorable drama-
tization of "The Diary of Anne
Frank,' " it reads. Owners of the
commercial rights to the Diary
have barred preformance or publi-
cation of this play , which exists
only in an edition printed at the
author's own expense and sent out
"for literary discussion."
The strange story of this liter-
ary one-man fight is similar to that
told in Levin's novel "The Fana-
tic," about the troubled dybbuk of
a young writer, victim of the Holo-
caust, the interpretation of whose
work becomes the subject of a
Broadway controversy and of in-
ternational politics.
Petitions for production rights
for Levin's supressed play have
been signed by Nobel Prize Lau-
reate Albert Camus, Norman Mail-
er, I. B. Singer, Bruno Bettelheim,
and many other distinguished
writers, as well as by hundreds of
rabbis, including Arthur J. Lely-
veld, resident of the American
Jewish Congress. They urge that
production be permitted "in rec-
ognition, so appropriate to the
Diary, that not only human beings
but their works have a right to

Italian synagogue, devastated by
the Nazis during World War II,
has been completely restored and
promises to become a tourist at-
traction and a repository of Jew-
ish religious art of the Renaissance
period.
Z
The synagogue is located in
life."
I
Casale Monferrato. in northern
Italy, between Turin and Milan.
Orchestra and Entertahtment
The restoration work was accom- Criterion to Pay Honor
plished over the past 10 months
by Jewish and Gentile volunteers to Miss Betty Weinberg
under the supervision of the re-
Criterion Club for single adults
cional art department.
will honor its executive secretary,
The synagogue was rededicated Betty Weinberg, at a testimonial
WALKER LAMP
at ceremonies attended by Dr. dinner-dance 9 p.m. Saturday at
Modernized, Repaired
Elio Toaff, chief rabbi of Rome, the Northwood Inn.
Best Work In City!
and Dr. Sergio Piperno. president
Miss Weinberg is chief of the
of the Union of Italian Jewish club's information services, circu-
862-1821
Communities.
lation manager of "The Pace-Set- 15800 WASHBURN
Car. Pilgrim
The synagogue was built in 1595 ter" and chairman of the Criterion
under a special concession to the Fisher Theater party series.
She will receive the organiza-
Jews by the Duke of Mantua. It
served a community that, at its tion's citation for "exceptional and
outstanding
service."
peak, numbered some 800 Jews but
which has dwindled to 15 since
FOR THE TOPMOST
World War II.
IN DIRECT
During the 16th and 17th cen-
turies it was embellished with art
COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY
and came to be recognized as one
Featuring
of Italy's architectural master-
• HOME PORTRAITS
pieces. When the Nazis occupied
• BAR MITZVAS
Italy, the building was severely
damaged, but most of the religious
• WEDDINGS
PROFESSIONAL
objects had been hidden and were
ENTERTAINMENT
Phone 626-6546
saved.

LI 5-2737

For on Early Appointment

SCHWARIBEKS "/%71.,

KOSHER MEAT & POULTRY MARKET

We Serve Only PRIME and CHOICE MEATS

BRUST DECKEL
KOSHER SALAMI
SHOULDER ROAST
GROUND CHUCK STEAK
BEEF PATTIES for broiling
BREAST OF BEEF

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lb. 69c

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SPECIAL — SUNDAY, APRIL 27TH ONLY!

RIB STEAKS • • • • lb. 89c

WE DELIVER UP TO 16 MILE RD. PHONE 398-3180

13925 W. 9 MILE RD. at PARKLAWN

Oftialat Ruati. Font A kauxiTito Wotict!

Schools in Morocco,
Iran in Focus of JDC

.had an •eur
INStingkeiir

goes on specifically to commend

GRAND OPENING
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Fine Selection of New and Used Rugs Substantially
Reduced Kermans, Kazvins, Sarouks, Dergazines,
Hamadans, Chinese, Kazaks, Afgans,Bokharas,
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Mon.-Sat.

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399.2323

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