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January 10, 1969 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1969-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



32—Friday, January 10, 1969

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Youth News

Beth Abraham Youth
to Conduct Services

Beth Achim Teens
to Hear Expert on
Narcotics Sunday

Dr. Herbert A. Raskin, clinical
asociate professor of psychiatry at
Wayne State University, will ad-
dress member of Lahav United
Synagogue Youth, teen-age group
of Cong. Beth Achim, 2 p.m. Sun-
day at the congregation's suburban
mogul, Bernard J. Gimbel. They building, 21100 W. 12 Mile, South-
were divorced in 1959. Hank, who field.
A question-answer period will
has not remarried, lives in a beau-
tiful home in the exclusive Cleve- follow the speaker's presentation
on "Drugs — Their Use and Mis-
land suburbs of Shaker Heights.
use."
"Two of Hank's three children
In addition to his private prac-
are students at Yale. Neither is
tice of general psychiatry and
very enthusiastic about baseball,
psychoanalysis, Dr. Raskin has
although both play. The oldest boy
published numerous papers in
excels at football and is consider-
journals of medicine and learned
ing playing pro-ball after gradua-
societies on the treatment of nar-
tion. The younger Yalie is a fine
cotic addiction and alcoholism.
soccer player.
He was a participant in the first
"After Greenberg gave up the White House Conference on Drug
national pastime he took up tennis Abuse held in Washington, D.C. in
and plays as much as four times a 1960, is a consultant to the Mayor's
week. One of his frequent partners Committee in Detroit for Rehabili-
when he is on the West Coast is tation of Narcotic Addicts and
Pancho Segura. He rates himself 'a serves on the Joint Advisory Com-
B player. I can't beat the good mittee to the Federal Bureau of
guys but I'm good enough to play Narcotics of the U.S. Department
with them.' "
of the Treasury.
Lamparski tells the story of
Because of the alarming increase
"Mrs. Nussbaum" who was born in the use of drugs, all young peo-
Minerva Pious in Odessa, Russia. ple are invited to the Lahav meet-
He relates her Jewish back-
ing.

Beth Abraham Synagogue will
hold its first Youth Sabbath of the
season Saturday in the main sanc-
tuary.
Students of the synagogue's He-
brew school and youth group who
will conduct the entire service are
as follows:
Cantors, Howard Weingarten,
Steven Brodman, Jonas Goldberg,
Andrew Belder, Ronald Kopelman
and Bruce Fishman; Tora readers,
Fred Ackerman, Jonas Goldberg,
Mark Diskin, Allan Finkelstein,
Neal Goldin, Bruce Fishman, Mark
Sherman, Marvin Wagner and
Gary Fishman.
Sedra and Haftora summaries,
Ronald Borax, Allan Dorfman,
David Silber, Larry Mondry, Kary
Zate, Ronald Miller, Benji Solomon
and Neal Phillips.
Sermonettes will be delivered by
Fred Smith, Jack Nida, Sidney
Chait and Perry Beider. Additional
prayers and responsive readings

"Omnibus," the Children's live
theater program, will present
"Hansel and Gretel," a dramatiza-
tion of the fairy tale, by Wayne
State University Children's Thea-
ter 2 p.m. Jan. 26 in the Jewish
Center.
The story has been adapted for
the stage by Madge Miller and is
an hour long. '
The Wayne State University The-
ater tours the Detroit area each
year with stage versions of selec-
tions from children's literature,
playing to an audience of nearly
50,000, one of the largest children's
theater audiences in the country,
This is the theater's 28th annual
touring production.
Tickets are on sale at the Jewish
Center.

Alec Jacobs, David Kirsch, Stuart
Farber, Mark Farber, Sidney
Chait, Keith Fishman, Stuart Sil-
bert, Jack Pines, Mark Weiss and
Keith Fishman.
Assisting at the Tora as gabaim
will be Gerald Shulman and Steven
Chait.
Following services, a Sabbath
luncheon for all young people age
13-17 will be held.

JEFF DEMBS 356-8547

Hank Greenberg, 'Mrs. Nussbaum'
Traced by Lamparski's New Book

In a second volume entitled
"Whatever Became Of . . .?" pub-
lished by Crown, Richard Lampar-
ski recalls the names of very
prominent people and brings their
records back to light, re-introduc-
ing them, indicating what they did
and where they are now, what

HANK GREENBERG

their present activities are and
their importance in relation to
their roles in American life.
Among those recalled in this new
edition in the interesting Lampar-
ski series are Hank Greenberg,
Thomas E. Dewey, Paul Robeson,
the violinist Rubinoff, Nathan Leo-
pold, "Mrs. Nussbaum" and scores
of others.
A two-page story about Hank
Greenberg reviews his professional
career as a baseball player and
then states:
"In 1946 he was married to the
daughter of the department store

Youth Hospitality Service
Set Up in Israel; Group
Starts 'Cottage Industry'

ground, her role as an actress,
her success as a story teller, as
Pansy Nussbaum on radio. He
states: "She is currently to be
seen with Louis Jacobs in a TV
commercial for Traveler's In-
surance."
The story of Rubinoff the violin-

ist, who was popular in Detroit,
who lived here for a time, is among
the interesting items in this book.
We learn from Lamparski about
his family and are told that the
aging violinist now entertains
troops in Korea with his own com-
positions.
The more than 70 interesting per-
sonalities who held the limelight at
the height of their careers combine
to make this a most revealing
book.

London Underwriters, Government
of Ghana, File Claims for Plane
JERUSALEM (JTA) — Heavy

claims for damages caused by
Israel's Dec. 28 commando raid on
Beirut International Airport have
been lodged by London under-
writers and by the government of
Ghana, one of whose planes was
destroyed in the attack.
The Ghanaian plane, a Viscount-
10 jet, was leased to the Middle
East Airlines, a largely Arab-own-
ed company, and carried its insig-
nia. The Israeli commandos who
carried out the raid were scrupu-
lously careful not to harm the air-
craft bearing the insignia of non-
Arab countries. The claim from
Ghana for compensation was em-
barrassing because that country
has been friendly with Israel and
maintains close commercial ties.

NEW YORK — Pioneer Women
has announced that a hospitality
program will be conducted this
summer for children over 12 years
of age visiting Israel with their
i
parents.
The program, which will be di-
rected by Moetzet Hapoalot, Pio-
neer Women's sister organization
in Israel, will enable young visitors
to spend some time with Israelis
of their own age. The youthful tour-
ists also will be invited to visit
with Israel youth groups and to use
the recreational facilities of Pio-
neer Women's agricultural schools
in Eron, Hadera, Kanot, Ayanot
A foreign ministry spokesman
and Ness Ziona.
said the government was studying
In describing the new youth serv- the claim. He denied a news
ice, Mrs. Charlotte Stein, national agency report that Ghana had
director of Pioneer Women's tour threatened to sever diplomatic ties
department in New York City, with Israel unless compensated
noted that although many young for the aircraft and said that
people prefer to visit Israel with the Ghanaian foreign minister had
their parents, they are reluctant to assured Jerusalem of his coun-
follow the same adult schedule as try's intention to maintain good
their elders. This new program, relations with Israel.
she pointed out, should be a boon
Reports from London meanwhile
to both parents and teen-agers and
provide visiting youth with many said the British government was
preparing
to pressure Israel to
pleasant memories.
Earlier, Pioneer Women an- compensate British underwriters
nounced inauguration of a step to- who were processing some $25,-
ward the establishment of the "cot- 000,000 in claims arising from the
tage industry" principle to supple. Beirut raid.
ment production in Israel's apparel
The total cost of the 13 aircraft
industry.
destroyed was estimated at close
Three work centers, catering to to $50,000,000 but the burden did
immigrant women, have been lo- not fall entirely on British under-
cated in Tel Aviv, Natanya and writers because part of the claims
Rishon Lezion. Pioneer Women were re-insured. The British
personnel in these centers arrange Board of Trade has reportedly
for the distribution of piecework asked for pressure on Israel, and
from garment plants or custom the government was said to be
tailoring firms to housewives seek- working out the "mechanics of a
ing added income.
diplomatic approach."

Summer Camping
for All Ages Set by

Fresh Air Society

Mrs. Julian H. Scott, president of
the Fresh Air Society, announced
that applications are now available
for its summer camping program.
Fresh Air Society operates Camp
Tamarack at Brighton for 8-10-
year-old children and Camp Tama-
rack at Ortonville for children
11-16.
Nature, camperaft, canoe trips,
aquatics, arts and crafts, drama-
tics, music and other activities are
in both programs, which strive to
help the child feel comfortable
with his Jewishness.
In the pioneer program, teen-age
campers live and plan in separate
villages in which the emphasis is
on outdoor living, projects, extend-
ed canoe trips and cultural excur-
sions and activities. Selected teens
will participate in the trip program
to Canada and the Western states.
Camp Kennedy, located near
Munising in the Upper Peninsula
provides camping experiences for
14 to 16-year-old boys and girls.
The program emphasis is in con-
servation, projects and extended
trips to the national forests and
parks.

Tween Bands Wanted

"Merging Traffic"

Accelerated
Rock and Roll Sounds
Available for Parties
Call
Bar Mitzas, Socials, Etc.

will be conducted by Jeffrey Phil-
lips, Danny Curhan, Mark Weiss,

PHOTOGRAPHY

CARSON ZELTZER

547-4805

WEDDINGS — BAR MITZVAS
SPECIAL OCCASIONS

Essay Contest Is Open
to High School Seniors

NEW YORK—Yavneh, the reli-
gious Jewish students association
announced that competition is now
open for the annual Erna Michael
Memorial Essay Contest. The con-
test, which offers a first prize of
$300 for the best essay on a topic
in Jewish philosophy, history, so-
ciology, Bible, or halakha (law), is
open to all Jewish high school sen-
iors in the United States and Can-
ada.
Second and third prizes are $150
and $50 respectively. The winning
essay will be published in the
Yavneh Review, the association's
annual student journal of Judaica.
For additional details write Yav-
neh, 84 Fifth Ave., N.Y.C. 10011.

COop
Ept
JE RRY

JEWELER

DIAMONDS - PEARLS - JEWELRY

PEARL AND BEAD STRINGING

406 Broderick Tower — 963-2573

CI

'

0

a

LAMPS & SHADES

0

Large Selection of
Modern Lamps and
Shades in Stock.

MADE TO ORDER

24711 Coolidge

DICK STEIN

& ORCHESTRA

LI 7-2770

ART LIGHTS

LAMP REMODELING
AND REPAIRING

Music the Stein-Way

Corner 10 Mile

0

LI 2-3022

We Make Our Own Glasses

HEADQUARTERS FOR
• LATEST DOMESTIC AND
IMPORTED FRAME FASHIONS

For the sixth year, the Fresh
Air Society and United Hebrew
Schools will operate a Hebrew-
speaking village, Kfar-Ivri, for
24 youngsters. Hebrew classes
and informal study groups will
be conducted during the morn-
ing, with afternoon and evening
devoted to activities of the regu-
lar camp program. Counselors
who speak Hebrew conduct this
program.
David Ben Shalom of Israel will

teach puppetry at camp. Six spe-
cial presentations, both in Hebrew
and English, were prepared in Is-
rael for the program.
Two canoe trips in northern On-
tario are scheduled for teens with
previous camping experience.
For information and applications,
call Fresh Air Society, DI 1-5666.

Omnibus to Present Play,
`Hansel and Gretel'

• PRESCRIPTIONS FOR GLASSES
ACCURATELY FILLED

• Immediate Repair

• Reasonably Priced

ROSEN OPTICAL SERVICE

13720 W. 9 MILE nr. COOLIDGE
LI

OAK PARK, MICH.

Hours: Daily and Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 6

7-50 68

.

p.m.

................................................ .
1
• WALLPAPER DISCOUNTS i •
S
._ To TO 40% •
• • i SAVE
WE DISCOUNT ALL CURRENT WALLPAPERS

The Tween Dance Committee of •
the Jewish Center is auditioning
bands to play at dances. Interested
tween or teen bands may leave
name and phone number with Fred : 14960 LIVERNOIS

Rose, DI 1-4200, ext. 261.




KNOPPOW PAINT CO.

Phone: 862-5272 :

• Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7 A.M.-5 P.M.—Closed Sat.—Sun. 9 A.M.-2 P.M. :

• —

Girls to Hear Career Talk •

Horizon Club girls will hear a

talk on careers in speech at their
next meeting 7:30 p.m. next
Wednesday at the home of leader
Mrs. Louis Landau, 24231 Gardner,

Oak Park.




THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL !

1 WONKOTE LATEX $2"



_ •

••

GAL.


• • •



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