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December 20, 1968 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N.Y. Federation Aids Vandalized Schools

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

NEW YORK—The Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies announced
Wednesday emergency grants of
up to $200,000 to aid three van-
dalized Orthodox Hebrew day
schools, the first financial grants
to nonmember agencies in the 51-
year history of the federation.
Samuel J. Silberman, federation
president, said the unprecedented
action had been unanimously ap-
proved by the board of trustees.
The three schools to be helped in
a two-stage program are the
Yeshiva of Eastern Parkway, the
Ahiezer Yeshiva and the Sharai
Zedek Hebrew Academy, all in
Brooklyn. They have an enrollment
of 1,850 children. The federation,
which comprises 130 medical,
health, recreational and social
service agencies in metropolitan
New York, distributes funds only
to member institutions. Silberman
explained that the problem was
"an emergency, and a Jewish re-
sponsibility, that federation can-
not—nor would it want to—avoid."

Marseilles Jewish Center
to Accommodate New
Community of 65,000

In the first stage, the federa-
tion was appropriating $50,000 to
meet the needs of the three-
day schools for relocation of
classes, rental of temporary
quarters and replacement of
books, sacred scrolls, ritual ob-
jects, equipment and other neces-
sities, to enable the schools to
resume full educational activi-
ties.

Israel Numismatists' Tour

NEW YORK — American and
Canadian Coin collectors, numis-
matists, coin dealers, their friends
time. Total damages have been and the public at large—are invit-
estimated to be at least $750,000. ed to participate In a 10-day study
Silberman said the schools tour of Israel, announced Joseph
"were built, and have been sup- Milo, assistant trade commissioner

ported, literally by the dimes
and dollars of their adherents,
all of whom are among the poor-
est members of our community."
He added this was the third time
this year that the federation had
_ appropriated grants from emer-
gency funds for critical com-
The second stage will provide
aid for rebuilding, repairing or
munity problems.

renovating the damaged and de-
stroyed facilities. Silberman said
that after the schools have de-
termined the extent and costs of
their capital needs, the federation
will make a grant of 20 per cent
of the cost to a maximum of
$150,000.

Officials of the schools had re-
ported to the federation that they
were in serious financial difficul-
ties, indicating that insurance had
been minimal compared to the ex-
tensive losses. Two of the schools
are in communities officially desig-
nated as poverty areas and cannot
ask parents of students to carry
the full financial burden. Many
pupils are on scholarships.

"In their hour of crisis, they
have turned to federation for as-
(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
sistance,"
Silberman said, adding
to The Jewish News)
MARSEILLES — A $185,000 Jew- that if the federation did not help,
the schools might not be able to
ish center patterned after commu-
resume full programs for some
nity centers in the United States,
was dedicated here Monday to
cater to the needs of a Jewish
population that has grown rapidly
as a result of immigration from
North Africa and Eastern Europe.
The center, named for the late
Edmond Fleg, French Jewish
writer and humanist, was built
through public subscription here
and abroad and the joint efforts of
French and international Jewish
organizations and French govern-
ment ministries.
The project was initiated in 1963
by a local Bnai Brith chapter
which received $10,000 from Amer-
ican chapters of that service or-
ganization. Another $20,000 was
pledged by the French ministries
of youth, sports and family wel-
fare. Major contributors were the
Joint Distribution Committee,
Fonds Social Juif Unifie, Central
British Fund for Jewish Relief and
Rehabilitation and the Conference
on Jewish Material Claims Against
Germany. The latter organization
allots restitution funds for the re-
storation of European Jewish com-
munities destroyed during the
Nazi era.
Dedication ceremonies, attend.
ed by 200 persons, were address-
ed by Byron Guy de Rothschild,
president of the Fonds Social

Last May, the federation gave
$2,125,000, matched by an equal
sum from its hospitals, to con-
tinue service to Medicaid patients
when funds were cut off by New
York State. At the start of the
summer, the federation gave spec-
ial grants for programs for the
city's underprivileged. Silberman
said that the federation, "faced
with this new situation directly
affectinl our own people," sought
to respond "with the same sense
of responsibility" as in the other
two actions. The vandalism and
fires, which occurred in November,
have been attributed to teen-agers.

of Israel, on behalf of the Israel
Government Coins and Medals
Corporation, co-sponsors of the
project. The tour will depart from
New York on March 10.

Admiration, like love, wears out.
—Vauvenargues.

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Juif Unifie, and Louis D. Hor-
witz, director general of the JDC.
Among those present were Mayor
Gaston De Ferre of Marseilles
and Mrs. Madeleine Fleg.
Baron de Rothschild said the new

center was the latest of 60 built all
over France to meet the communal
needs of 200,000 Jews from North
Africa and Eastern Europe who
have come to France in recent
years. Horowitz said at least 60
more are needed to help integrate
the newcomers and rebuild com-
munities where no organized Jew-
ish life existed.
The Marseilles Jewish commu-
nity is the largest in France, `Paris
excepted, and has grown from
12,000 in 1955 to over 65,000 today.
The Fleg center has an auditorium
named after the late Charles H.
Jordan, executive director of the
JDC, a foyer, library, snack bar,
discotheque, meeting rooms, Tal-
mud Tora classrooms and rooms
for arts and crafts.

Perfection seems to be nothing
more than a complete adaptation
to the environment; but the envi-
ronment is constantly changing, so
perfection can never be more than
transistory.
—W. Somerset Maugham.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
Friday, December 20, 1968-11

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