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November 15, 1968 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1••••••• ■ .10....4.•

Par Lagerkvist's Novel 'Herod and Mariamne':
Its Historical Shortcomings Christologically

Par Lagerkvist, the 1951 Nobel
Prize winner in literature, is in-
clined to write on religious sub-
jects, on the Holy Land and the
Christian mythological themes. He
is the superb allegorist, the author
of parables, which he incorporated
christologically in "The Holy
Land," "The Death of Ahasuerus,"
"Barabbas," and now in "Herod
a n d Mariamne" published by
Knopf.
It is a dramatic story about the
cruel king of Judaea, Herod, his
hatred for the Maccabees who
fought him because he was an
Edomite and was not fully circum-
cized, and his love for Mariamne,
the beautiful girl who was herself
from the ranks of the Maccabean
folks in Israel.
Lagerkvist's novel — brief, in
his usual style—limited to 110
pages—ably translated from the
Swedish by Naomi Walford—de-
scribes Herod's dedication to the
temple he was building, a temple
that was to be finer and larger
and more affluent in the jewels
and wealth it was to iisplay
than was Solomon's. Mariamne
showed no interest in his/temple;
she is described as not having
needed it.
Mariamne managed, before her
marriage to Herod, to rescue some
lives of her relatives the Macca-
bees. That's how she came to visit
him. Later, after a brief period of
Herod's al)tention from cruelty,
he resumed his war against the
Maccabees, annihilated the town
whence Mariamne came, suspected
her of having given messages to
her kinfolk, had her murdered but
to his last days mourned her be-
cause she of all the women he had
was his greatest love. His final

words were "Mariamne, Mari-
amne."
So far, we have in Lagerkvist's
"Herod and Mariamne" a bit of
ancient history. It is limited history
—Lagerkvist does not tell about
Mariamne's two sons from the
marriage with Herod, Alexander
and Aristobulus, who also were
murdered because Herod did not
want the seed of a Maccabee to
survive.
Lagerkvist does not state that,
while Herod's love for Mariamne
is unquestioned, that he wanted
a link with a Maccabee to coun-
teract the Jewish people's hatred
for him and his assumption of
kingship because he was not a
Judaean but of foreign blood.
But the most deplorable part in
Lagerkvist's "Herod and Mari-
amne" is resort unnecessarily to
christology by injecting into this
novel the theme of the three wise
men and the appearance of a star
on the horizon.
He is not to be blamed for re-
sorting to Christian mythology in
making use of this theme, but his-
torically such a parable is a dis-
tortion.
Herod, who was called "the
Great" because of his conquests
and possibly also because he re-
built the Temple in Jerusalem,
(the Masada exhibit relates not
to Solomon's but to Herod's
Temple), ruled from 37 to 4 BCE.
It was before the Christian era,
and certainly long before the
Pauline period when Jesus (the
star intended in the Lagerkvist
parable) was a reality on the
world's scene.
But creators of parables un-
doubtedly have their novelists' and
poets' right to do a little deviating.

Youth News

Applications for Hebrew
Teacher's College Taken

Applications are now being ac-
cepted from men and women ages
18.25, for the academic year 1969-
70 at the Hayim Greenberg, teach-
er training institute, Jerusalem.
Two study programs are avail-,
able — an advanced course of
studies for those presently attend-
ing one of the recognized Hebrew
teachers colleges in the United
States, and a more basic program
for applicants with a less advanced
background.
Students at the institute spend a
year in Israel on full maintenance
and tuition scholarship, and attend
institute classes 24 periods each
week. The year's work includes
travel and a kibutz work period.
Applications may be obtained
from Dr. Mordecai S. Chertoff of
the department of education and
culture of the Jewish Agency, 515
Park Ave., New York 10022.

FS

They Made
the Grade

GLORIA H. GOLDMAN, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gold-
man of Stoepel Ave., and NAOMI
WAINER, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Sol Wainer of Marshall Rd.,
Southfield, will appear in the roles
of "Prudence" and "Olympe" re-
spectively in Tennessee William's
play, "Camino Real" opening 8:30
p.m. today at Wayne State Univer-
sity's Bonstelle Theater.
*
MARLENE HECKER of Lincoln
Terrace Dr., Oak Park, was re-
cently elected sweetheart of Tau
Epsilon Phi Fraternity, Wayne
State University chapter.

TeMple Israel Youth
to Lead Creative Service

The youth group of Temple Is-
rael will lead Sabbath morning
services Saturday -
The first creative youth service
'Midnight Shift' to Work of the year, "The Chosen. People"
will
have participants :from both
at Bnai Moshe Jam
the youth group and the high school
Sean Conrad, disc jockey from choir, under the direceon of Cantor
station WKNR, will be featured at Harold Orbach.
a teen-age jam with 'two featured
bands, the "Misunderstood" and
"Midnight Shift," 8:30 p.m. Nov. Registration Open Again
for WSU Yiddish Class
27 at Cong. Bnai Moshe.
Students who wish to enroll for
Refreshments and prizes will be
featured at the jam, sponsored by the next quarter of beginners Yid-
the Bnai Moshe Youth Commission. dish at Wayne State University
may do so now by calling Hillel
It is open to all Jewish youth.
For information' or tickets call House, TE 1-0129. The next quarter
Bnai Moshe, 548-9000; or Jeff begins Jan. 6.
Kovacs, 353-2366.
Classes are taught by Detroit
4
4
4:
educator Movsas Goldoftas two
Rabbi Moses Lehrman will install afternoons a week in Room 446 of
the new officers of the junior con- the university library.
gregation Saturday in the main
sanctuary.
Denny McLain pitched 336 in-
Officers include Morris Mickel- nings for the Tigers in 1968, lead-
son, president; Sam Mickelson, ing the league. He was the first
vice president; Lisa Roth, secre- Tiger to pitch more than 300
tary; and Bruce Braverman and innings since Hal Newhouser did it
Kenneth Garber, gabbais.
in 1945.

32—Friday, November 15, 1968

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

-

1,7

Sam Mayldels Celebrate
50 Years of Marriage

The reader, however, should know
the historic facts. Perhaps parable
can be better appreciated when the
true details are known. Lagerkvist
writes brilliantly. His "Herod and
Mariamne" is a brilliant novel—
with historic data told only in lim-
ited form and the injection of the
three wise men and the star a
utilization for fiction and not for
historic reality. —P. S.

RADOM TAILORS AND CLOTH-
IERS, 22141 Coolidge, in celebra-
tion of its 11th anniversary in Oak
Park, is offering a storewide sale
of 20 per cent off on the entire
stock of brand-name men's suits,
sport coats, slacks, topcoats,
haberdashery and formal wear.
Alterations will be free. Proprietors
of the store are the late Mr. Ra-
dom's daughter and son-in-law,
Mn, and Mrs. Louis Levinson, who
continue the store's tradition of
personalized service, expert tailor-
ing and alterations on all clothing.
Ladies' alterations are under the
supervision of Rosa Levinson, a
stylist and fashion coordinator.
* *

Weekly Quiz

By RABBI SAMUEL J. FOX

j gency, Inc.)
e wish TIcrariiiig A

Why is a mourner forbidden to
work during the seven days of
mourning?
The rabbis in the Talmud de-
duce this prohibition from a verse
in the Book of Amos (8:10) which
reads: "I will turn your festivals
into mourning." From this they
learn that "as labor is forbidden
during a festival so is it forbidden
during mourning" (Talmud Babli,
Mo'd Katan 16b, 20a). The logic
behind this association is quite ob-
vious. Both the gaiety that is re-
quired during a festival and the
sadness -that is required during
the seven days of mourning require
a certain state of mind. Ordinary
labor detracts from the spirit of
joy during the festival as it does
from the spirit of grief during the
seven days of mourning. One of the
later rabbinic authorities (Ginath
Verdaim) explains that any man-
ner of labor is forbidden especially
during the first three days of
mourning under any circumstances
because the first three days are
those in which a mourner is sup-
posed to cry over his loss. Being
engaged in work takes his attention
away from the matter at hand so
much that he cannot engage in
crying. Apparently the rabbis con-
sidered crying a necessary act
which probably was an indispen-
sable tool of relieving the anxiety
and pressing grief of the mourner.
* * *
Why is the greeting one gives
to his neighbor on the Sabbath
different from that which is of-
fered on any other day of the
week? (On a weekday, one says
"Shalom Aleihem." On the Sab-
bath one says "Shabat Shalom"
or "Gut Shabos.")
Basically this is one of the ways
in which a Jew remembers the
Commandment to "Remember the
Sabbath Day." By doing things
differently on the Sabbath he
brings attention to the fact that the
Sabbath is a different day than
any other day of the week. He is
thus "remembering the Sabbath to
keep it , (or really to make it)
holy," (setting it apart and making
it different than the ordinary day
of the week). A recent writer ex-
plained that when a Jew greets
his fellow Jew with the expression
"Shabat Shalom" ("A Sabbath of
Peace") he is actually expressing
the fact that the Sabbath brings
both peace and harmony between
body and soul. In the weekday,
the-soul rejoices in study and wor-
ship while the body grieves be-
cause its bodily pleasures are ne-
glected during worship and study.
The body rejoices in partaking of
food while the soul is grieved, be-
cause of the time spent in eating,
taking one away from study and
worship. On the Sabbath the meals
that one eats accomplish a spirit-
ual fulfillment as well; likewise
the time spent in worship and
study present no material loss to
the body which seeks material
gain, labor is forbidden on the
Sabbath anyway and there could
not have been any material gain.
Thus the time spent in study and
worship prevents the bodily in-
stincts from becoming monotonous.

The American Diabetes Associa-
tion reports that the prevalence of
diabetes in the United States has
increased almost 95 per cent since
1950. Diabetes now ranks eighth
among the causes of death by dis-
ease.

Business
Brevities

MR. AND MRS. SAM MANDEL

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Mandel, 20551
Lahser, celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary Nov. 3 at a din-
ner-dance at Cong. Beth Hillel.
They are the parents of Arnold,
Mrs. Lucille Gordon and Mrs. Har-
old Levin.
Married in New York City, Ann
and Sam Mandel moved to Detroit
in 1944. They have eight grandchil-
dren.

Reagan Biography
by Bill Boyarsky

Governor Ronald Reagan's
emergence as a possible Presi-
dential candidate creates wide in-
terest in the career of the noted
actor who has gained so much
popularity in his own state and is
acquiring an increased following
throughout the land.
Bill Boyarsky has written an
interesting biographical sketch of
the popular Republican in "The
Rise of Ronald Reagan."
This story of a noted actor now
a major political figure is a candid
and truly objective review of a
successful and impressive person-
ality.
Many charges, especially those
relating to the John Birchers, are
futed here.
Boyarsky presents his hero as
"a spokesman and a leader." This
biography will be read with great
interest as his political career
develops. —P.S.

In a recent BEE KALT TRAVEL
SERVICE advertisement for a spe-
cial weightwatchers group package
to Lido Spa in Miami Beach, the
price should have been $238.50, per
person, double occupancy leaving
Nov. 20. The trip includes air fare,
transfers, free daily massage, free
golf and tennis, all spa facilities,
all meals and much more. For fur-
ther information, call the agency,
JO 6-1490 or LI 9-6733. The Jewish
News regrets any inconvenience
our error may have caused.

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