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November 01, 1968 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

16—Friday, November 1, 196$

The Election
Time Rumors

Voter's Guide
to Amendment "A"

2 Israelis Start Lectures

on College Campuses

Michael Lotan, head of Socio-
logical Services Company, Ltd., in
Israel and Amnon Zakov, former
By DAVID SCHWARTZ
president of the National Union of
(Col:Tr/CM 1301, JTA Inc.)
You can't believe everything you Israeli Students, began a lecture

hear at election time.
When Jefferson ran for Presi-
dent his enemies said that if he
were elected, he would burn all
the Bibles in the country. When
Andrew Jackson ran for Presi-
dent, the report was spread on
the eve of the election that he had
passed away and a vote for him
would be thrown out. When Henry
Clay ran for President it was
whispered that he had traveled
on a train on Sunday.
My good friend Bernard G. Rich-
ards, who is now writing his mem-
oirs, will recall the story he told
me of the time he served in the
publicity department when Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt ran for the Presi-
dency.
Someone in the opposition dug
up a story which seemed to show
that FDR in his younger years had
been hostile toward immigration,
a sensitive point at the time with
Jews. Richards approached the
chief of the bureau asking what
could be done about it.
"Deny it," said the chief curtly.
And there is the story of Jimmy
Walker, disturbed by the inroads
made by Fiorello LaGuardia.
Jimmy's friend, the publicity man
Harry Reichstrach, advised Jimmy
to close all of his speeches with
the sentence calling on LaGuardia
to explain why he left Bayonne.
So Jimmy finished off all 'of his
speeches with "Let LaGuardia tell
the people why he left Bayonne."
The amusing part is that La-
Guardia had never been in Bay-
onne.

about?
Q. What are the main changes Amendment A would bring

A.

Zakov
Lotan
tour Monday, under joint auspices
of the United Jewish Appeal and
the Bnai Brith Hillel Foundations.
Lotan will tour American univer-
sities in the Southwest and Mid-
west and Zakov will cover uni-
versities and colleges in the east

and west coast.
Lotan was born in Berlin
in 1932 and came to Israel
in 1938. He served in the Israeli
army in "Nahal" as a member of
Kibutz "Hakshara."
In 1965, with two associates, he
established his own office for
applied sociology, Sociological
Services Company, Ltd.
Zakov was born in Tel Aviv in
1935. He joined the army at the
age of 17 and also served in
the Nahal as a member of Kibutz
Hakshara. As a kibutz member,
he was elected to the national
secretariat of Habonim.

Paid Political Advertisements

Human Rights Violation
Alleged by Syrian Envoy

Participants in Mission
Pledge Extra $4.5 Million

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

JERUSALEM—Members of the
14th United Jewish Appeal Study
Mission presently in Israel have
personally pledged contributions
amounting to $4,500,000 to this
year's Israel Emergency Fund,
Aryeh L. Pincus, chairman of the
Jewish Agency, announced Mon-
day.
Pincus said this sum was in addi-
tion to the $2,320,000 they had
pledged to the regular UJA drive
and represented an increase over
their pledges for 1967 and 1968.

In the gates of eternity, the black
hand and the white hand hold each
.other with an equal clasp.
' • ' --41..13.- Stowe

E LECT

I3 0 13 E

,

,

NI



I

First,. It would set a minimum retirement age for police and firemen at age
ears of service. At present there is no minimum age and some
65 after 25 f
-police and remen
are eligible to collect their pensions at age 46.
l
in pensions every
give an automatic 2 percent increase firemen
Second, It would the
increase by
pensions paid to retired police and
year. At present
any general pay raise granted to the active police
en amount equal to half of
and firemen.

Q. What are the main arguments for and against Amendment A?
Against—Opponents say the city has overstated the cost of the press
A.
ent pentIon plan.
For—The city figures show that an estimated 48 percent of the
police and firemen's payroll will go for pensions next year.
Against—Opponents say the new plan won't save money.
For—The city says It will save money beginning next year and
Increasing yearly thereafter because of the higher retirement
age and constant acceleration of pension benefits.
Against—Opponents say the new plan will discourage recruiting.
For—City officials believe the new pension plan will be far ahead
of plans offered In Industry and will be no handicap In hiring
police and firemen.
Against—Opponents say police and firemen should be able to retire
before they reach the age of 55.
For—City officials say policemen and firemen we most valuable
when they have gained the knowledge In their Jobs that
comes with long experience.

Q.

Will Amendment A raise city taxes?

A. No. The charter amendment has no provision for a change in taxes.

O. Will the city save money if amendment A is passed?

A. The city says the new plan will encourage policemen and firemen to work to
age 55 before retiring, thus reducing the number of years they will receive
pensions. And since the increases in pensions will be a steady 2 percent a

year rather than the current unpredictable amount, less money needs to be
*et aside annually by the city in the pension fund,

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

UNITED NATIONS—Syrian Am-
bassador George J. Tomeh trans-
mitted Tuesday to Secretary Gen-
eral U Thant what he said were
seven cables from various Syrian
organizations concerning what he
called "violation of human rights
and the Geneva Conventions in
Arab-occupied territories."
One, said to be signed by the
Syrian Red Crescent, appealed to
Thant "to compel Israel" to admit
a Security Council representative
to "investigate cruel acts against
the Arab population."
Another cable attributed to the
executive bureau of the Syrian
General Federation of Trade
Unions, asked Thant to "put an
end to the horrible massacres
carried out by the neo-Nazis in
our occupied territories."
Other cables were said to have
been signed by the Committee on
Afro-Asian Solidarity, Federation
of Syrian Arab Teachers, National
Students Union and Association for
the Defense of the Rights of Man.
(Editor's Note: Israel has con-
sented to a study of the status of
Arabs in Israel-held territories on '
condition that a similar investiga- I
tion be made on the situation of
Jews in Arab lands.)

Proposal to Change the Detroit
Police and Firemen's Pension Plan

7.

Q. What effect will Amendment A have on present retirees?
A. None. it would affect only police and firemen hired after January 1, 1969.

Q. What effect will Amendment A have on present police and firemen?
A. Present employees can keep their present pension plan or accept the new

one, whichever they desire.

STATE REPRESENTATIVE
Member Maid Rents and
Cong. Seth Moses

Civic Issues Voluntary information Council, Inc.
A non-profit, non-partisan corporation

El 123 On Your Ballot

Min MISS ROAD

VOTE NOVEMBER 5 ?MIA"

RE-ELECT CONGRESSWOMAN

/74 4

MART-HA W.

PMIL

ongressiona
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Volunteers for GriffIta,,Iyeten,_

C. Bryant,

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