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October 25, 1968 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friends of Hillel, Akiva Day Schools
to Hear Mrs. Broner at Book Fair

Esther Masserman Broner, prize-
winning author and teacher, will
be guest of the Friends of Hillel
and Akiva Day School at the 17th
annual Jewish
Book Fair of the
Jewish, Center 10
a.m. Nov. 14.
Mrs. Broner, a
member of the
English depart-
ment at Wayne
State University,
has written two
books, "Summer
Is a Foreign
Land" and "Jour- Mrs. Broner
nal/Nocturnal/and Seven Stories"
and has had her poetry published
in many well-known literary mag-
azines.

"The New Nobility," a story_ in
the latter collection, won second
prize in "Prize Short Stories 1968:
The 0 Henry Awards." It is a
story based on Mrs. Broner's ob-
servations of college students
reaching out for values and identi-
fication.

Richard Lobenthal, director of
the Michigan Regional Office,
Anti-Defamation League of Bnai
Brith, will speak on "The New
Left—Is It Right?" that after-

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noon, cosponsored by the Nation.
al Council of Jewish Women.
Lobenthal is on the faculty of
the department of sociology and
anthropology of Wayne State Uni-
versity and its graduate school
of social work.
A highlight of the Book Fair will
be the second annual "Sisterhood
Day" Nov. 13 in which temple and
synagogue sisterhoods participate.
Mrs. Abe Katzman, chairman of
the day, announces that this year's
program will open at 10 a.m. with
a panel discussion: "How Can
Judaism Be a Positive Influence on
Our Youth?" The panelists will be
three "rebbitzens," Mrs. Joshua
Sperka, Mrs. M. Robert Syme and
Mrs. Jacob Segal. Moderating the
discussion will be, Mrs. Harold Or-
bach.
Luncheon will be served at
12:30 p.m., and reservations
must be made in advance with
individual sisterhood chairmen.
Luncheon speaker will be Zeda
Popkin, author of "Herman Had
Two Daughters."
* *
Mrs. Morris Friedman, chair-
man of the Jewish Center Yiddish
Committee, announces a pre-Book
Fair Yiddish literary evening 8:30
p.m. Nov. 7 at the Center.
Critical reviews of three Yiddish
books will be given by Dr. Shm-
arya H. Kleinman, Jay Rosenshine
and Wolfe Snyder.
Movsas Goldoftas will chair the
evening, open to the public.

Soviet Invasion Denounced THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
as ORT House Dedicated
Prof. JACOB NEUSNER of

TEL AVIV (JTA)—A bitter de-
nunciation of the Soviet invasion of
Czechoslovakia was delivered here
this week by Deputy Prime Minis-
ter Yigal Allon during a eulogy of
the late Charles H. Jordan, former
director-general of the Joint Dis-
tribution Committee, who died
under mysterious circumstances in
Prague in August 1967.
The occasion was the dedication
of the Charles H. Jordan Student
House at the ORT Technical High
School in Natanya. Attending the
ceremonies were Mrs. Ellie Jor-
dan, widow of the deceased; Gen.
Chaim Herzog, president of ORT
in Israel; Mrs. Golda Meir, for-
mer foreign minister of Israel;
and Dr. A. Bar Menahem, mayor
of Natanya.

Find Israeli Adviser
Fatally Shot in London

LONDON (JTA) — hfattityahu
Sharon, retiring press counselor at
the Israel Embassy here, was
found shot to death in his St.
Johns Wood apartment last week
with a pistol beside his body.
An investigation is in progress
but police said there was no evi-
dence of foul play.
Mr. Sharon, 42, a former major
in the • Israel Army, was married
last week to Varda Fodor, a sec-
retary to the Israel consul gen-
eral. He was due to return to
Israel shortly to take up a new
post.

Mrs. Broner's 'Journal/Nocturnal'

Features Detroiter's Fiction Works

Mrs. E. M. Broner, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Masserman,
has already gained considerable
fame with a published play, with
numerous stories, one of which re-
ceivad the second prize in the 1968
0. Henry stories.
Now we have her collected fiction
in a new volume, entitled "Jour-
nal/Nocturnal," based on the ini-
tial narrative in the book published
by Harcourt, Brace & World (757
3rd, NY17). In addition, this vol-
ume contains seven other stories,
among them the 0. Henry prize
story, "The New Nobility."
As in all her works, Mrs.
Broner, who teaches English at
Wayne State University (her hus-
band, Robert Br one r, also
teaches at WSU and is a well
known artist), is inspired by the
liberality of our time, by her
dedication to the civil rights
movement and by a Jewish heri-
tage which provided her with
basic facts, scores of Yiddish
words and a knowledge of Jew-
ish traditions—all of which are
injected in her narratives.
"Journal/Nocturnal" is unique.
The Journal part is titled "The
Eye's Mind," and Nocturnal is
"The Mind's Eye." There is an
admonition at the very outset for
the reader: "You will find herein
neither confession nor revelation,
rather, digression and deception."
Yet, there is a feeling that there
is much of confession in this crea-
tive work. And in her resort to the
"dybbuk" perhaps there is also
relevation.
Thus, the Detroit fiction writer
makes very much of the Passover
theme and the seder. It is an in-
teresting theme in which family
interests find an emphasis. Then
there are impressions of familiar
events, a fashion show is one of
the landmarks, and in a sense a
social sphere is unfolded here.
Because of the familiarity of the
theme, the fiction writer could
even be excuse for asserting as an
introduction to one of her themes:
"The rabbi said to the children,
`From little Jewish acorns, Jewish
oaks grow.'" •
Out of these stories there
emerge commentaries on life,
and the narrator certainly
evinces a deep understanding of
many -of the lac-eta- of Jewiili life;

the Negro problem, the emotion-
alism of our time.
"The Enemies" is a story that
concludes in revelatory form. An
Israeli is selling clothes. It turns
out he is an Arab lad.
In "Each Face Extinct" Sammy
Davis is introduced, and the rabbi
in the story is involved in a
stale joke asking Sammy Davis not
to move on his block. It's a crude
story, but these are the liberties of
the narrator.
"The New Nobility" carries
through the Negro-Jewish experi-
ence, also utilizes the seder and
related themes.
Jewish reactions to Negroes are
frequently mentioned, and the
story "The Schva" is intended to
refer to "schwartze."
Humor and pathos are inter-
mingled in Mrs. Broner's stories,
and in this entire collection there
is evidence of remarkable skill by
a woman who has distinguished
herself in short story writing.

Why should there not be patient
confidence in the ultimate justice
of the people? Is there any better
or equal hope in the world?
—Abraham Lincoln

Brown University was named pres-
ident of the American Academy of
Religion at its annual meeting. The
academy inaugrated a permanent
section on Judaic studies.

Friday, October 2, 1968-17

■.■

Truth never yet fell dead in the
streets; it has such affinity with
the soul of man, the seed however
broadcast will catch somewhere
and produce its hundredfold.
—Theodore Parker

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