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October 18, 1968 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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Friday, October 18, 1968-11

TEMPLE ISRAEL

Ban on Hebron Demonstrations
Eases Tensions After Violence

JERUSALEM (JTA) — Tension
eased somewhat in Hebron Tues-
day as Jewish and Moslem groups
canceled rival demonstrations in
compliance with a military govern-
ment ban on public rallies and
demonstrations in that West Bank
town. Israeli troops moved into
Hebron in large numbers earlier
when it appeared that the ban
might be defied and a clash be-
tween Jews and Arabs precipitated.
The ban was imposed Monday
when the so-called Greater Israel
Movement announced that it would
hold a demonstration at the Patri-
archs' Tomb in Hebron, the site
of last week's grenade explosion
that injured 47 Jewish visitors and
Worshipers.
At the same time, Arab elements
in the town called for demonstra-
tions against Jewish prayers at the
tomb, which is enclosed by the
Ibrahimi Mosque compound, an
Islamic shrine. Unidentified Arabs
circulated leaflets Tuesday pro-
testing the demolition of several
buildings in Hebron owned or used
by alleged terrorists who were
arrested in connection with the
grenade incident.
The Greater Israel Movement,
which advocates Israel's perma-
nent retention of all Arab terri-
tories occupied in the Six-Day
War, indicated that it would call
off its rally. Later it appeared
that the group—or members of it
—planned to defy the ban to
demonstrate for what they claim
are Jewish rights at the tomb.
The military government pointed
out that in view of the continuing,
unhindered stream of visitors to
the site, there was no purpose to
be served by demonstrations.
The Israelis meanwhile cleared
an area near the tombsite in order
to ensure the safety of worshipers.
A number of Arab residents were
evicted from their home and in-
stalled in other quarters.
Police reported that a 17-year-
old Hebron high school student has
confessed to throwing the hand
grenade that injured the 47 Israeli
visitors to the tomb.
The youth, identified as Addin
Rashid Geit, was apprehended
within 12 hours after the incident.
Defense Minister Gen. Moshe
Dayan told newsmen that punitive
measures were likely to be taken
against several other Hebron resi-
dents known to have cooperated
with young Geit.
The grenade attack was de-
nounced by Shiekh Mohammad Ali
Jaabari, the mayor of Hebron,
who declared that it was as much

AJCongress Urges Draft
Exemption for 'Moral
Opposition' to a War

NEW YORK (JTA)—The Ameri-
can JeWish Congress urged an
amendment to the National Selec-
tive Service Act that would exempt
from military service persons who
oppose a particular war on the
basis of ethical or moral principles
as well as religious convictions.
A resolution adopted by the
AJCongress' national governing
council alleged that the present
draft law resulted in "discrimina-
tion" against those whose objec-
tion to service in war was not
based on a generally recognized
religious system of ethics.
The resolution said the refusal
of the Selective Service System to
recognize the right of conscien-
tious objection based on nonre-
ligious grounds was "inconsistent
with democratic principles." It
also "runs counter to our national
and religious principles to compel
a man to carry and use a gun
against another man in a cause
that he regards as morally
wrong," the AJCongress said.
The organization supported
amendments to the draft law that
would allow conscientious objec-
tors "as wide a variety as possible
on nonpunitive alternate forms of
service."

an assault on Arabs as it was on
Jews.
In a radio interview, Gen.
Moshe Dayan urged Jews to con-
tinue to visit the shrine which
was reportedly filled with wor-
shipers. Gen. Dayan told news-
men that stricter security meas-
ures would be taken to safeguard
tourists and worshipers in
Hebron. Several Israeli news-
papers warned against acts of
reprisal by Israeli youth for the
incident.
Meanwhile, the military governor
warned Tuesday that schools in
Nablus would be shut down unless
local authorities took steps to end
the student strikes and anti-Israel
demonstrations there. Nablus
schools are supported by Israel,
which pays the teachers salaries.
The military governor said Israel
would not maintain schools that
are used as anti-Israel propaganda
cells. The schools reopened Tues-
day after a two-day strike.
The Jewish Telegraphic Agency
correspondent who visited Nablus
Monday reported that the town
was quiet and had its normal
quota of Israeli shoppers and sight-
seers. But schools were closed
Sunday and Monday as students
boycotted classes to demonstrate
against the Israeli occupation and
events in Hebron. Several hundred
high school girls marched on the
military government compound
Sunday shouting "Long Live El
Fatah," the Arab terrorist organ-
ization. They protested loudly
against Jewish prayers at the
Patriarchs' Tomb in Hebron, dem-
olition of Arab houses there and
the eviction of some Arab resi-
dents to clear the area around the
tombsite.
Israelis Wounded in Clash
Near Beisan Valley Settlement
TEL AVIV (JTA)—Two Israeli
border policemen were slightly in-
jured when bazooka shells hit their
armored car near Gesher settle-
ment in the Beisan Valley Tuesday.
In another incident, an Arab sabo-
teur was killed and another was
presumably wounded in a clash
with an Israeli patrol in the south-
ern Godlan Heights. The latter
clash occurred Monday when the
Arabs were intercepted by the
patrol and exchanged fire with it.
A loaded bazooka and an anti
vehicle mine were found on the
body of the dead man. Blood
stains indicated that his com-
panion. who escape d, was
wounded.
An Israeli settlement in the
Negev on the site of the pre-1948
settlement of Beth Haarava was
attacked Sunday with six rockets
fired from a Czech-made "Katush-
ya" rocket launcher, it was report-
ed Tuesday. No damage or casual-
ties were reported.
Arab marauders fired on an
Israeli patrol near Tirat Zevi Tues-
day and shelled Israeli forces near
Umm Sidra in the Jordan Valley
Monday night. Israeli return fire
hit several El Fatah positions on
the Jordanian side of the line. No
casualties were reported. A mili-
tary spokesman reported that four
bazooka shells were fired Monday
at Yuval settlement in Upper
Galilee near the Lebanese border.
No damage was done. Four home-
made bazooka shells with self-fir-
ing devices were found nearby
along with an antivehicle mine.
Mortar shells were fired on
Israeli forces in the vicinity of the
Abdullah Bridge in the Jordan
Valley Tuesday, and an Israeli
halftrack was attacked by bazooka
shells and automatic fire Wednes-
day, a military spokesman an-
nounced.
There were no casualties and the
vehicle was undamaged.
The spokesman disclosed that an
injured saboteur was captured
Monday night after a clash with
an Israeli patrol north of the
Allenby Bridge. Other members of
the band escaped. A bazooka and
anti vehicle mines were found
nearby.

i Adult Education Program 1968-69

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Temple Israel Presents a Noteworthy Two Part Program
Featuring a Series of Lectures by Eminent Authorities, and
Classroom Studies Under the Tutelage of The Temple Israel
Staff. These events are Scheduled for Monday Evenings.
Classes Will not be Held on Lecture Evenings.

0

LECTURE SERIES AT 8:30 P.M.

Monday, October 21—IRA HIRSCHMANN
"America's Stake In The Middle East"

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Monday, November 4—RABBI SAMUEL SANDMEL
"Judaism and Christianity"—
Their Common Ground and Differences

Monday, December 2—RABBI SOLOMON B. FREEHOF
"The Teachings of The Talmud"

Monday, January 6—DR.JAKOB J. PETUCHOWSKI
"The Bible of The Synagogue—How the Rabbis Read Scripture"

Monday, February 3—RABBI EUGENE B. BOROWITZ
"The Religious Turn In American Fiction"

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CLASS STUDIES

Classes will begin October 28th—from 8:00-9:00 and will be repeated
from 9:00-10:00 so that those enrolled may have the benefit of two
courses.

Dr. Leon Fram
• INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT
What the Average Christian Knows of the Jews Through the New
Testament

Rabbi M. Robert Syme
• INTRODUCTION TO THE TALMUD"
How the Talmud Developed and the Relevance of Its Teachings to
Modern Life

Cantor Harold Orback
• "THE PRAYER BOOK"
A Survey of the Prayers and the Liturgy in the Union Prayer Book

• "HEBREW"
Cantor Arthur Asher
Beginners Hebrew at 8:00 P.M.—Advanced Hebrew at 9:00 P.M.

There is a nominal charge of $5.00 per person for the entire lecture series.
This one charge includes your enrollment in the Educational Classes. In-
dividual lecture admission is $1.50 for each lecture. You may enroll in ad-
vance or prior to the commencement of lectures and classes.

TEMPLE ISRAEL

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ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM FRANK L. SIMONS

17400 MANDERSON RD., DETROIT MICH. 48203 UNiversity 3-7769

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