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October 04, 1968 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24—Friday, October 4, 1968

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Judge Lincoln Evaluates 1967 Riots,
Warns Poverty Situation Persists,
Shows EffectiVe Peace-Keeping Need

Wayne County Probate Judge , issue in the 1968 election," and
James H. Lincoln has produced anl while he finds that educational
imporant social document in "The I progress has been made, he de-
Anatomy of a Riot" in which he plores also the domestic problems
reviews the major occurrences in created by dropouts.
Stating that schools will have to
volving juveniles in the July 1967
"adjust in many ways to fit the
Detroit riots.
The impressive studies, which moods of today's world." he adds:
are implemented with charts pre- "The most effective way to reduce
senting facts and figures, were race problems is not to treat these
published this week by McGraw problems as race problems but to
Hill Book Co., and the revealing effect basic changes in the homes
and schools of millions of children
of all races."
Negro is for
"The
and dignity," Judge
aces -
out that
.tates.
Pointing
Lin
pc
t, is not limited to Negroes,
he admonishes: "Programs to
abolish poverty should be direct-
ed at all races."
His book covers problems in-
volving housing, delinquency, the
vast amount of illegitimacy, birth
control; and guidance is offered for .
wholesome approaches to the needs,
for federal action, for massive aid
to education. He asserts:
"We must accept the proposition
that 'only people count'and proceed
on the course that will produce a
nation of achieving citizens. Then
the troubles that confront us will
gradually disappear. To achieve
this we must adopt programs that
will make massive changes in the
JUDGE JAMES LINCOLN
home and school environments of
details emerge of national interest millions of children."
Of special merit in Judge Lin-
due to the comments. recainmenda-
tions. criticisms and evaluative coln's book is an appended report,
implemented
by a map of the
data.
affected riot areas and charts con-
Judge Lincoln indicates that
taining
facts,
that
was submitted
"The atmosphere in Detroit was
more conducive to a riot in 1967 to him by Dr. Richard Komisaruk,
director
of
the
Clinic
for Child
than in 1966." While he shows
that some of the culprits were not Study of the Wayne County Juve-
poverty-stricken. he repudiates nile Court.

those who deny that poverty
played a role in the developing
situations. He declares that dis-
content in the povery areas in

Detroit was greater in 1967, that
"the response by the people to a
riot situation was more difficult
to handle," and he charges that
"for a number of reasons: the
forces that had kept peace in De-
troit and avoided a riot since
1943 failed to function effectively
in July 1967."
There is a failure to treat the
problem in its proper magnitude.
Judge Lincoln deplores and he
states that he has found that peo-
ple do not want to think about it.
He warns that "Crime, delinquency
and riots may well be the major

hmuel Katz Art

at - Beth Shalom

Capital for Israel

Nets $70,000

At the Capital for Israel din-
ner held at Cong. Bnai David,
which brought $70,000 in addi-
tional investments, are (from
left) seated: U.S. District Court
Judge Lawrence Gubow; and
Simcha Dinitz, minister of in-
formation in the Israel Embassy
to the United States, guest
speaker; and standing Louis E.
Levitan, Detroit representative
of Capital for Israel and director
of the Detroit Israel Bond Or-
ganization; and A. J. Cutler,
trustee of IsraeL

Rokeach 99 Years Young:
It All Began With Soap

The ancient Ari Synagogue in
Safed is the subject of this
lithograph by Israeli artist
Shmu-el Katz, whose works will
be featured at the Israel art
show planned by Cong. Beth
Shalom for Oct. 29-Nov. 3 at
the synagogue. The collection,
"Young and Old Masters of Is-
rael," was assembled by the
Pucker/Safrai Art Gallery. An
"illegal immigrant" in 1946,
Katz helped establish Kibutz
Gaaton and continues to be a
working member, earning his
share as a cartoonist, book il-
lustrator and watercolorist."

I. Rokeach and Co. is one year
away from celebrating 100 years
of providing products for Jewish
homemakers.
Rokeach's first product was 100
per cent coconut oil kosher soap,
the first on the market. In the
1920s Rokeach came out with
another first — Rokeach Nyafat —
the first hydrogenated shortening.
Rokeach came out with the first
packaged borscht early in the
1940s, then gefilte fish (the first
company to offer it in cans) and
a total of 60 items distributed in
all major cities.
Rokeach plans to continue the
introduction of new products, cer-
tified kosher by the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations of

Ai/laical; e

I

The ROMANIAN FOLK BAL-
LET, with its company of 100
dancers, singers and instrumen-
talists, comes to Masonic to open
the Masonic Auditorium Concert
Series, 8:25 p.m., Oct. 25 and 26.

Il ra b-Bot kin Vow.>' Lawrence Gubow
to Be Inducted as
to Be Spoken Dec. 14
Judge on Oct. 11

Lawrence Gubow will be sworn
in as federal judge at 2 p.m.
Oct 11, in Judge Ralph M.
Freeman's court on the seventh
floor of the Federal Building. it
was announced Tuesday.

MARILYNN SHAPIRO
PHOTOGRAPHER

Weddings, Bar Mitrvos
Super 8 Movies

356-8819

Farband to Celebrate
Sukkot, Hold - Annual
Citywide Conference

MISS MARSHA WEINTRAUB

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Weintraub
of Murray Hill Ave:, announce the
engagement of their daughter
Marsha Ann to Leon Howard Bot-
kin of Stratford Ct., Oak Park.
Mr. Botkin is the son of the late
Mr. and Mrs. Elias Botkin.
Miss Weintraub received her
BS degree in education from
Wayne State University. Her fi-
ance, also a WSU graduate, is
presently working on his masters
degree in social work at Wayne.
The couple plans a Dec. 14
wedding.

Joseph Katz, president of the
Detroit City Committee, Farband
Labor Zionist Order, announces
a Sukkot celebration will take
place 8:30 p.m. Oct. 12 at the
Labor Zionist Institute.
Morris Fisher, assistant national
secretary of Farband, will be guest
speaker. Movsas Goldoftas will
read from holiday literature, and
refreshments will follow. The pub-
lic is invited.
On the following day, starting
at 10 a.m., in the institute, the
Farband City Conference will take
place. On the agenda will be re-
ports from the national board
meeting, Detroit City Committee
and its branches; and the elec-
tion of offieers. Lunch will be
served.

Students, Parents
Confer at Mumford

To inform students and parents
more fully of various educational
opportunities, vocational plans and
school activities, Mumford High
School, in conjunction with the
Mumford Parents' Club, is spon-
soring a series of student-parent
orientation meetings •
Highlighting these meetings will
be comments by Bertrand Sand-
vi•eiss, principal, Oliver Coleman
and William Koloff, assistant prin-
cipals. In addition, parents and stu-
dents will be given information
regarding curriculum, course de-
scriptions, graduation requirements,
job opportunities, tuition and schol-
arship grants, testing and various
school activities.
Coordinated by Manuel Simon,
counselor, the meetings will be
held at the Mumford auditorium at
7:30 p.m., Oct. 3, 7, 9 and 14.

`Automobiles 'of America'

• "Automobiles of America" (mile-
stones, pioneers, roll call, high-
lights) is the latest publication is-
sued by Wayne State University
Press. It was prepared by the
Automobile Manufacturers Associa-
k 6 it
ijkof

AND NOVELTY PENS. THE
NEWEST INVITATIONS &
ACCESSORIES FOR ALL
OCCASIONS SHOWN IN
YOUR HOME.

MARCIA MASSERMAN

646-6138

From LONDON, ENGLAND

ZAN GILAISE1ST

Hebrew Taught in 50 Public
Schools in New York City

NEW YORK (JTA)—Fifty schools
in the New York City public school
system now offer Hebrew language
courses, according to Dr. Judah
Lapson, director of the Hebrew
Culture Council of Jewish Educa-
tion Committee of New York City.
He reported that the latest schools
to offer Hebrew language courses
were the Franklin Delano Roosevelt
High School and the Canarsie High
School, both in Brooklyn, and the
Curtis High School in Staten Island.
The latter is the first in the bor-
ough to provide modern Hebrew
language courses. Schools in the
four other boroughs have been
teaching Hebrew for more than 35
years, Dr. Lapson said. He report-
ed that more than 3,200 students
were registered for the Hebrew
classes in New York City schools
at the end of the school year last
June.
Dr. Lapson said that students of
Hebrew in public schools receive
full language credits for Regents
examinations and for entrance and
that hundreds of high school grad-
uates continued the study of He-
brew in colleges and universities in
the city. He reported that more
than 1,500 college students in the
city were enrolled currently in He-
brew courses.

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