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August 30, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-08-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U.S. Military Equipment for Israel
Backed in Strong Democratic Plank

(Continued from Page 1)
Organization as a foreign agent.
The statement was made at the
platform committee hearings by
Richard Korn of New York, presi-
dent of the anti-Zionist organiza-
tion.
Korn contended that the "as-
sumption that a Jewish citizen of
the United States has an automatic
political link with any foreign
country is . . . false in fact and
offensive in content." He urged
the committee to adopt policies in
the Middle East conflict which
"best serve the interests of the
U.S." and alleged that in the past,
American policy in the Middle
East had capitulated to "Zionist
pressures" and has resulted in
Zionist interests being promoted
instead of American national in-
terests.
Korn said the U.S. government
must distinguish between Zionist
political activities on behalf of
Israel and "political activities of
Americans conducted on their own
behalf." To accomplish this, he
said, the government should en-
force the Foreign Agents Registra-
tion Act "with impartiality to the
non-diplomatic foreign agents of
. . . Israel, the Zionist Organiza-
tion, and the various Arab states."
He said that U.S. citizens would
then be aware of such foreign
agents and could "appraise their
statements and actions in light of
their associations and activities."
Korn said that "there may well be
particular instances in which the
U.S. should support Zionist and Is-
raeli causes" but they should be
supported because of U.S. national
interests and for no other reasons.
Korn was thanked for appearing,
as most members of the subcom-
mittee applauded his testimony. He
was asked no questions.
Mrs. Michael Shapiro, interna-
tional president of Bnai Brith
Women, urged that the program
of the Democratic Party include
an immediate reordering of major
national priorities, including peace
in Vietnam; poverty, discrimina-
tion and the problem of the cities;
and the Middle East conflict.
She called on all Democratic
candidates to run on a platform
"standing for the right of the State
of Israel to live in peace, and for
the right of Jews in other lands to
enjoy the equality and opportunity
to pursue their lives as we do
here."
In Chicago, Harry Torczyner,
chairman of the public Affairs
committee of the Zionist Organi-
zation of America, told the plat-
form committee that "as far
away as Eastern Europe the stir-
rings of freedom were felt after
the Six-Day War of 1967."
He noted that President Wood-
row Wilson endorsed the Balfour
Declaration and President Harry
S. Truman "was the first to recog-
nize Zion restored."
Torczyner, who also spoke last
month before the Republican Plat-
form Committee at the party's con-
vention in Miami Beach, where he
represented the ZOA, pointed out
that it was the ZOA's deep convic-
tion that the security of the U.S.
is best served by having in the
Middle East a "strong and reliable
friend like Israel, not only because
this old and new country repre-
sents and embodies all of the prin-
ciples for which American stands,
but also, because it has by its very
existence, strengthened the influ-
ence of the U.S. in all those coun-
tries that have not subordinated

their policies to those of a foreign
great power, hostile to the U.S."
The American Jewish Commit-
tee recommended a series of
planks on U.S. policy in the Mid-
dle East, the situation of Jews in
Soviet Russia and Poland and prob-
lems arising from the. urban and
racial crises at home. The propo-
sals were presented by AJCom-
mittee President Morris B. Abram.
The proposed plank on Middle
East policy urged the U.S. govern-
ment "to make it unmistakeably
clear to the Arab states that we
support without qualification, Is-
rael's right to live in peace within
secure and recognized boundaries,"
that there should be no withdrawal
of Israel from present cease-fire
lines until the Arab states "have
renounced all claims of belliger-
ence, including economic boycotts
and restrictions on Israeli ship-
ping, and have binding treaties
with Israel." Abram urged the
Democrats to "affirm that Jeru-
salem should remain a unified city
in which the legitimate interests
of all concerned can be satisfied
within the framework of an over-
all Arab-Israeli peace settlement."
Also proposed were generous
aid for constructive efforts to
solve the Arab refugee problem
but opposition to U.S. aid to Iraq.
Syria and Egypt until they cease
harassing their Jewish communi-
ties.
(In Washington a Republican
member of the House Armed Serv-
ices Committee received a non-
committal reply from the State
Department to his request for ac-
tion on the sale of F-4 supersonic
Phantom jets to Israel which is
advocated in the Republican Par-
ty's platform. Rep. Bob Wilson, of
California, disclosed he had re-
ceived a letter from Assistant Sec-
retary of State William B. Ma-
comber, Jr. who wrote that Isra-
el's request for the Phantoms re-
mained "under active and sympa-
thetic consideration" and was
"continually under review, the con
trolling principle being to improve
the stability of the situation in the
area." Rep. Wilson, chairman of
the Republican Congressional Com-
mittee, charged in a subsequent
statement that the department
was ignoring massive Communist
penetration of the Mediterranean
and said "The least we can do in
terms of immediate action is to
bolster Israel's deterrent capacity
by selling Israel . . . Phantom
jets." The Macomber letter dis-
closed for the first time that So-
viet-supplied TU-16 jet bombers
have been technically transferred
to "UAR (Egyptian) air inven-
tory" and were using Egyptian
bases in surveillance operations
against the U.S. Sixth Fleet.)
Authoritative men at the Demo-
cratic National Convention re-
ported that Soviet Russia was
moving additional naval and air
units to the Eastern Mediterran-
ean, presumably to be based in
Egypt, They indicated that
Washington believed the move
could have ramifications in the
Middle East crisis although it
was ostensibly directed against
Yugoslavia which supported the
liberal regime of Czech Com-
munist Party chief Alexander
Dubcek and has denounced the
Soviet occupation of Czechoslo-
vakia.
Leading Democratic senators
briefed by President Johnson and
others in recent days acknowl-
edged here that Washington was
deeply concerned with these devel-

opments. But, they indicated, the
administration's initial response
appears to be to avoid a confron-
tation by ruling out closer U.S.
identification with Israel which
Secretary of State Dean Rusk be
lieves would cause an automatic
alignment of all Arab states behind
Russia and shatter U.S. diplomacy
throughout the Moslem world. One
prominent Senator said that the
chance of White House action on
the sale of F-4 Phantom jets to Is-
rael was injured rather than im-
proved by the new mood of United
States caution arising from the
Czech crisis.
Israel Ambassador Yitzhak
Rabin attended Wednesday the
Democratic National Convention as
an honored guest. The convention
band played an arrangement of
Hava Nagila, the Israeli folk song,
apparently in honor of Gen Rabin.
This week Gen. Rabin will leave
for Venezuela where he will visit
the Jewish community.
Bailey Pledged Non-Use
of Biased Clubs in Chicago
NEW YORK (JTA)—The Demo-
cratic Party was pledged not to
use the facilities of any "club or
meeting place where religious or
racial discrimination is practiced"
during its national convention in
Chicago. The pledge was made by
John Bailey, chairman of the
Democratic National Committee,
in a letter to Dore Schary,
chairman of the Anti-Defama-
tion League of Bnai Brith,
in response to one from Schary
which noted the discriminatory
practices of some social clubs in
Chicago.
A similar exchange of letters
was made prior to the Repub-
lican National Convention in Mi-
ami Beach between the ADL and
Ray C. Bliss, chairman of the Re-
publican National Committee.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

6—Friday, August 30, 1968

Stokely Carmichael Denounces Israel
at Arab Student Parley in Ann Arbor

Black militant Stokely Car-
michael, addressing a dinner at
the national convention of the Or-
ganization of Arab Students in
Ann Arbor, Monday night, assailed

Key Convention Figure

Zionists and whites as "oppres-
sors" of Arabs and blacks.
Carmichael denounced the Uni-
ted States and Israel saying he's
ready to "take up arms and die
if necessary to help the Arabs
free Palestine."
The one-time leader of the Stu-
d e n t Non- Violent Coordinating
Committee drew applause for his
assertion that "We intend to make
it clear we will help the Arabs
in any way we can, not only with
material but with our lives. Ther
are many of us who are getting
prepared and we intend to fight
imperialism. We will fight for
Egypt"
The week-long convention Is
closed to the public although the
Anti-Defamation League of Bnai
Brith has been keeping close watch
on the proceedings. Security at
the dinner was reported very tight,

Lead the way with

As chairman of the rules com-
mittee, Lt. Gov. Sam Shapiro
of Illinois was among the key
figures at the Democratic con-
vention.

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