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August 02, 1968 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-08-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Dover Makes Available Unusual Record Set
Perpetuating Presidents' Voices, Noted Debate

0—Friday, August 2, 1968

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS



Recorded Presidentialyoices, the
actual: voices. of men • whO lead
political,' movements or laredonii-
nate in the„sCi,eneeS and literature,
Will remain • Precious. It is fortu-
nate, for this generation that this
is possible, and it is a matter for
great satisfaction to know that the
spoken words Of- Presidents Tru-
• man, _Eisenhower, Roosevelt, Ken-
nedy and Johnsen liave been re-
tained, that the speeches 'of Adlai
Stevenson are available on records.
Furthermore, the complete texts
of the famous Kennedy-Nixon de-
bates have been retained and re 7
corded and are available on rec-
ords to be played back for attain-
ment of a knowledge of what trans-
pired on the, political arena.
These unusual records are made
available by Dover Publications.
*
"Voices of History"—the voices
of -the: Presidents from FDR to
Johnson—can be heard on five re-
cordings just released by' Dover to
launch the Spoken Word, its brand-
new, record line:- 7
These 'recordings Of inaugural
addresses other crucial talks —
capture moments in which history
was made. FDR'S'first inaugural
address, Warning a- depression-rid-
den nation against panic. . . . JFK's
speeches on the • Cuban missile
crisis, when atomic war 'seemed
near. . .• Johnson's first address
as President to Congress(when he
first proposed his. civil rights re-
forms ... these and other speeches
bring to life the: high points of the
modern American: Presidency.
They also bring to life the Presi-
dents themselves, providing—as a

Walter

Jack

Lenution Matthau
The Odd Couple

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written text cannot —7 insights to pendence under laws of reason and
these men as individuals; as poli- of justice. On the -•;secend side of
ticians, as spokeStnen for 'their this recording, Stevenson discusses
country during times of crisis, as American Vietnamese 'policy with
public figure's reacting in public Thomas Barman, senior diplomatic
correspondent :of the British 'Broad-
to'they 3ublic:
"Voices of History' ' will eventu.: casting Corporation. This last in-
ally include three more records of terview with . `Ambassador Steven-
addresses by Theodore Roosevelt son was recorded by"-the BBC at
and William Howard Taft; Wood.: the American Embassy in London
row Wilson and Warren G. Hard- juA before his death. The= dialogue
ing; Calvin _ Coolidge and Herbert covers Stevenson's 'views • toward
Hoover. It will be the only series negotiations for peace, the .role of
currently in print to offer speeches the United Nations -in - the:conflict,
by.. all the Presidents from 1901 on and his . attitude toward . military
aural confrontation with some force. The record is:
Adlai Stevenson: The foreign
60 years of history that presents
policy of the United States,
the voices of this era's most im-
March 2, 1961; American Viet-
portant group of leaders.
namese policy, discussion with
h e company stresses that
Thomas Barnian, BBC cor-
speeches, inCiuded "Voices of
respondent, July 14;.1965.
History" are all complete ad-
dresses. Nothing is abridged or
Dover Publications acquired the
cut, there is no needless corri- Spoken_ Word, Inc., in 1966 as a
mentary. E v,e r y President
wholly owned subsidiary.; Dover=
represented by at' least twenty which also . issues classical and
minutes of unbroken talk—a major language records, paperback and
speech delivered at `a crucial point clothbound books—has since re-
.an his career. The records have edited the records, re-designed the
been made from live, on-the-spot jackets, and prepared new and
recordings; and, in keeping with lengthy liner notes.
the Dover policy of issuing quality
The Kennedy-Nixon debates of
recordings at the loweSt possible 1960 set a precedent in American
1 prices, they are priced "at only politics. For the first time in his-
$2.95 apiece. Now available in tory, the - Democratic and Republi-
mono only:
ean Presidential candidates argued
Franklin Delano' Roosevelt: In- campaign issues face to face over
' augural addresses Of March 4, nationwide TV. .Their historic
1933., Jan. 20, 1937.
confrontations played a crucial
Franklin Delano ROosevelt; In- role in determining the outcome of
augural addresses of Jan.. 20, the year's election race; 85;000,000
1941; Jan. 20, 1945.
people watched the four debates,
Harry S. Truman; Inaugural ad- three of which were. "won" by
dress of January .20, 1949.
Kennedy. • One Roper poll reported
Dwight David Eisenhower: In- that 3,400,000 votes were decided
1 augural addresses of Jan. 20, by the series, and Kennedy won
1953; Jan. 20,. 1957; Farewell over , Nixon, by less than 119,000
broadcast-of Jan. 17; 1961.
tallies.
-John Fitzgerald Kennedy; In-
The original "live" Kennedy-
augural address of Jan. 20,
Nixon
debates can be heard in full
1961; three Cuban: Missile
speecheS, Oct. 22; 1962; Nov.. 2, (complete* with:voides of the mod-
erators, newsmen who took part)
1962; Nov. 20, 1962.
Lyndon Baines Johnson: Oath- on four recordings re-released by
taking, Nov. 22, 1963; address Spoken Word. - --
Prepared from on-the-spot re-
to Congress, Nov. 27, 1963;
Thanksgiving Day message, cordings; these records bring to
life all the drama and the tension
Nov. 28, 1963.
The Spoken Word also has issued of those four historic evenings back
as part of its "Voices of History" in 1960—Sept: 26; Oct. 7, Oct. 13,
series, two addresses by the late and Oct. 21. They recreate - the
Adlai •E. Stevenson on American highlights '- of the Kennedy-Nixon
foreign policy. The first of these, campaign better than any book or
delivered almost . immediately after memoir.
the formation' of the Peace Corps,
The records also offer voters
is an eloquent and detailed state- timely opportunities -to compare
ment of Stevenson's deeply felt be- the issues and the candidates of
lief that the larger nations of the 1960 with those of 1968.
world must help the smaller _ones
achieve a true and lasting inde-

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MEADOICEROOK

JAN
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WITH.

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James Levine, Conducting

In a Concert Perforrnance of

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JOSEPH E LEVINE
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MIKE. NICHOLS

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IT IS WRITTEN THAT 490 TIMES YOU CAN SIN AND BE
THIS MOTION PICTURE IS ABOUT THE 491".
JANUS FILMS...

NEW YORK—More than 49,000
1 Jewish men, women- and children
received resettlement and related
assistance from United Hias Serv-
ice last year, inclUding 6,242 mi-
grants and refugeeS 'who were
helped to find new homes in West-
ern countries. _
Gaynor L ,Jaeobson; executive
vice president of the worldwide
migration agency, „stated in the or-
ganization's annual report that as
a result 'of the 'Six-Day' War al-
most 25,000 JeWs fled Tunisia,
Morocco, Libya; Egypt, Lebanon
and other Arab countries...
Jacobson noted that 1,356 ref-
ugees and migrants were as-
sisted by United Inas to resettle
'the United States last year.
Assisted, immigration to Canada,
comprised principally of French-
speaking Moroccan Jews,
amounted to 989, compared with
44'7 the'.previofis -year, an in-
crease of ..120- per cent. ,Latin
America received 164 migrants,
mainly refugees from Arab
countries, an increase of 16 per
cent.• • . • •
The National Origins Quota Sys-
tem which -has governed the U.S.
immigration policy for the past 44
years is no longer the law of the
land, he said. "A new and more
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