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June 28, 1968 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

30—Friday, June 28, 1968

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Youth News

Teens to Spend Sununer in Israel

%;:k: :. •

.

The largest group of campers since Histadrut inaugurated its
summer program for teenagers, seven years ago will be leaving
for Israel in July. They will join an equal number of Israeli teens
at Kibbutz Gesher Haziv and Hakfar Hayarok for a program of
fun, sightseeing and educational activities. Participants above are
(from left) front row: David Canvasser, Marc Diamond, Richard
Ambinder, William Smith, Howard Eisenberg, Eric Shapiro and
Bonnie Seifer; second row: Dianne Goldberg, Steve Matz, Toni
Dizik, Bradford Walters, Matthew Kline, Jeff Rosner, Neil Levin
Larry Shulman and Donna Kost; third row: Debra Epel, Karen
Maltzer, Ilene Gotlieb, Janet Gotlieb, Robert Kahn, Gary Zeltzer,
Rosanna Honig, Pattie Muroff, Ethel Eisenberg, Gail Silver, Tova
Gornbein, Brenda Benson and Laura Roby; and fourth row: Abbey
Alpern, Joanne Schulman, Marilyn Fridman, Daniel Schottenfels,
Eric Hoffman, Dena Epel, Debra Chandler and Andrea Sachs. Not
shown are Julie Ann Brown, Michael Lesansky, Deborah Scott,
David Weberman, Sylvia Asa, Robert Gosman, Linda Hoffman,
Mickey Malamud, Nettie Reiter, David Schmier, Sandra Singer,
Michael Suhd and Martha Ullman.

Windsor Lass Wins
"Miss DIT" Crown

Brenda Oventhal, an 18-year-old
Windsor girl won the title of "Miss
DIT" (Detroit Institute of Tech-
nology), recently.
Brenda is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Oventhal of 1357
Dufferin, Windso -
Chosen f r o ni
eight contestants
judged on the
basis of popular-
ity and beauty,
the young fresh-
man was crown-
ed by last year's
queen at the col-
lege's spring fes-
tival prom.
Brenda, w h o
Brenda
will carry the
title until next year, is a graduate
of Kennedy Collegiate High School
in Windsor and attends Shaar Has-
homayim Synagogue.

Youfh Singing, Games in Dover Paperbacks

In Britain, ancient traditions
like the rituals of Border warfare
are kept alive in an unexpected
form—in children's singing games
like "We Are the Rovers." In this
game children line up on two sides
and re-enact one of the Medieval
battles in which English forces
defended their garrisons against
invading troops from Wales.
The words, tunes, and directions
for playing eight of these tradi-
tional games are provided by
Alice B. Gomme in one of the most
charming children's • books ever
printed, "Children's Singing
Games With the Tunes to Which
They Are Sung." Originally pub-
lished in 1894 in a limited edition
of 110 copies, this beautifully de-
signed work is now available from
Dover in paperback. Mrs. Gomme,
an important folklorist whose
"Traditional Games of England,
Scotland, and Ireland" is also
available from Dover in two

Temple Tutors Aid
Inner-City Youth

Birmingham Temple Youth will
join their elders this summer in
a Head Start tutorial program. -
Members of Birmingham Temple
have sponsored a program for in-
ner-city children for the past three
years — not only helping them
with schoolwork, but taking them
on trips and supplying them with
warm clothing for winter.
This Kennedy School Project has
grown from a small program to
the virtual adoption of an entire
school.
In May, members sponsored
a weekend at the Detroit Recre-
ation Camp for 96 fifth and sixth
graders. Sunday school boys and
girls contributed to the project,
as did a fraternity at Eastern
State College.
Temple members and Kennedy
teachers accompanied the chil-
dren, who spent their days with
arts and crafts, nature hunts, a
small boat regatta and story hours.
Interested volunteers — students
age 15 to 17 — may call Mrs. Don-
ald Black, chairman, 543-6957.
Membership in the temple is not
required.

volumes, has also provided inter-
esting background information on
the games — "Poor Mary Sits a-
Weeping," "When I Was a Young
Girl," and others. The numerous
drawings, border designs, and
full-page plates that decorate the
book are by Winifred Sthith.
Eighteen more traditional folk
games from England and America
—Virginia Reels "Draw a Bucket
of Water" "Old Roger" etc.—are
found in "Singing Games and
Playparty Gam6s" compiled by
Richard Chase, "Dover paperback
reprint.

Rick Epstein Top Senior at Berkley High School

Achievement ("The Little Wayne
Oakland Bank") and the Amateur
Radio Club. He is business man-
ager of the Berkley "Insider," has
a basketball letter and is vice
president of the biology club and
the Berkley Student Research
Project.
Rick was a member of the Unit-
ed Nations team named the best
at the University of Detroit mock
UN, was a winner of the UN As-
sociation National Test, holds a
Michigan High School Debate Key
and was one of three to receive
the Detroit Classical Association
(Latin) award. Rick graduated
summa cum laude.

Jack (Rick) Epstein, son of Mr.
and Mrs. David Epstein of Talbot
Ave., Huntington Woods, received
the Distinguished Achievement
Cup at the recent honors assem-
bly at Berkley High School, and
his classmates rose to give the
graduating senior an ovation.
Besides this award, the school's
highest, Rick was named a Mass-
achusetts Institute of Technology
scholar and re-
ceived National
Merit, Michigan
State University,
Alvin Bentley,
State of Michigan
Competitive and
National Honor
Society scholar-
ships and the So-
cial Studies De-
partment Cup.
Rick serves as
Rick
president of the
United Nations Study Group, Ju-
nior Classical League, Junior

MUSIC BY

SAM BARNETT

AND HIS ORCHESTRA

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PHOTOGRAPHY

GARSON ZELTZER

Bnai David Youth to Help Write Tora
Scroll During Special Ceremonies

547-4805

Leaders of the Bnai David
youth groups and honor students
in the Bnai David High School
program will participate in the
unique 'Siyum Hasefer" cere-
monies to be held at the syna-
gogue 2 p.m. June 7, Melville J.
Richman, chairman of the pro-
gram, announced.
Siyum Hasefer means the com-
pletion of writing a Tora scroll.
The writing of a personal Tora
scroll is a special mitzva, Rabbi
Hayim Donin, spiritual leader of
the congregation, explained. One
is enabled to participate by writ-
ing at least one letter into the
Tora. When a new Tora is pres-
ented it is customary to leave the
last few words or last few lines
incomplete and during the Siyum
Hasefer to honor individuals with
the opportunity to fill in a letter.
This is done under the guidance

of a scribe who directs the indi-
vidual in how to do it properly.
The contribution of a new sefer
Tora to the congregation in mem-
ory of Daniel and Fannie Litsky
will provide the opportunity. In
addition to members of the Litsky
family and leading members of
the congregation participants will
be those young people of the con-
gregation who have been partic-
ularly outstanding either in their
Hebrew studies or in their service
to the congregation.
The community is invited.

They Made
The Grade

JACK

Anti-Israel Move
Defeated by ILO

GENEVA (JTA)—The Interna-
tional Labor Organization adopted
a resolution on human rights after
a week of heated debate during
which the Arab delegates support-
ed by the Soviet bloc and several
so-called n o n - aligned countriel
tried in vain to force inclusion of
anti-Israel amendments. The ILO
resolution took note of a human
rights proclamation by the recent
International Conference on Hu-
man Rights in Teheran. Iran, but
rejected Arab amendments which
would have mentioned an anti-
Israel resolution at Teheran which
accused Israel of violating human
rights in occupied Arab terri-
tories. In addition to the Commu-
nist bloc, the Arab amendment
was supported by Yugoslavia, In-
dia, Pakistan, Ghana and Ethiopia.
The Arabs also failed to have spe-
cific mention of Palestinian Arab
refugees included in the ILO para-
graph which stated that displaced
refugees all over the world are
the concern of the international
community.
The ILO resolution on human
rights denounced discriminatory
practices, the denial of freedom of
association and all other infringe-
ments on human rights. It called
on member states to take immedi-
ate steps to eliminate injustices
and authorized the director-gen-
eral of the ILO to report at the
next conference the steps taken
by member states to eliminate vio-
lations of human rights.

CINDY KAUFMAN, 5280 W.
Outer Dr., president of Gottlieb
BBG, has been accepted as a par-
ticipant in the 1968 Summer Pro-
gram in Israel of the Bnai Brith
Youth Organization. Cindy is go-
ing into the 11th grade at Liggett
School. Preceding the flight to Is-
rael, those selected for the program
will participate in orientation ses-
sions at Camp Bnai Brith, Star-
light, Pa. Cindy is a niece of Rabbi
Jay Kaufman, executive vice presi-
dent of the Supreme Lodge, Bnai
Brith.

* *

Herbert Eidelman chairman of
the youth commission of Cong.
Bnai Moshe announces the follow-
ing scholarships awarded to youth
members: Barbara Silberschein,
Debbie Kelman and Linda Beitner,
Ramah Study Program in Israel;
David Reed, Camp Ramah, Cana-
da; and Marilyn Stern and Jackie
Brown, Camp USY.
*
*
MIRIAM K A H A N, a June
graduate, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Abe Kahan, former Detroit-
ers now of Los Angeles, Calif., will
be entering San Fernando Valley
State College in the fall.
g.: *
MARC E. OLESHANSKY, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Oleshansky
of Glastonbury Ave., was elected
mayor of Tyler City at the annual
American Legion Wolverine Boys
State.

First World War I Casualty
Ronald L. Q. Henriques was the
first English Jew to be killed dur-
ing World War I.

WEDDINGS — BAR MITZVAS
SPECIAL OCCASIONS

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