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April 19, 1968 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

Community Relations Unit Program
to Ban Inequality, Injustice, Poverty

NEW YORK (JTA)—Nine major
national Jewish agencies and 81
community relations agencies af-
filiated with the National Commun-
ity Relations Advisory Council,
called for a comprehensive federal
program to "banish inequality, in-
justice and poverty" from this land
and said that they and their mem-
bership were prepared "willingly
to assume whatever share may fall
upon us" of the economic costs en-
tailed.
They called upon President John-
son to propose this comprehensive
program and on Congress to en-
act it.
A resolution adopted by the ex-
ecutive committee of NCRAC April
17 and transmitted to President
Johnson affirmed that this country
"That the resources to provide all
our people with the essentials of
a decent, dignified human life,
while meeting our obligations
abroad."
It said that "failure to use those
resources to banish inequality, in-
justice and poverty is as immoral
as it is indefensible. There can be
no higher priority for the nation."
The resolution expressed readiness
to assume a share of the costs in-
volved and urged member organiz-
ations and their constituents "to
make known to their legislators
and other officials of government
their like commitment."
The program urged on the Presi-
dent and Congress would provide,
the resolution stated, a decent job
for all who are employable or can
be made so by retraining; - income
sufficient to provide all others
with essentials of civilized living;
decent dwellings for all; medical
care for all; education to the limits
of each person's capacity, and the
elimination of all forms of discrim-

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ination and segregation from the
life of our society.
The resolution noted that the as-
sassination of Dr. Martin Luther
Kng, Jr., and the emotions aroused
by it, attested to the urgency of de-
cisive action. It warned that such
action must be initiated now lest
the nation "be precipitated into an
irreversibly destructive course to-
ward internecine strife that could
sunder our national unity and de-
base the character of our social
order."
It denounced rioting, pillaging
and looting but warned that the al-
ternative to violence must not be
"blind repression."
Concern was expressed for the
Jewish merchants who were among
the victims of the disorders that
_followed the King assassination.
Community relations councils in
cities where disorders occurred
were urged to participate in devel-
oping special approaches for coun-
seling and for practical assistance
to these victims.

Jews Return to Hebron
to Rebuild Community

(Direct JTA Teletype Wire
to The Jewish News)

TEL AVIV—Seventy Jews, most-
ly from religious settlements, re-
turned to the ancient town of
Hebron Wednesday to re-establish
the Jewish community which
ceased to exist here after the Arab
riots of 1936. The new arrivals
were greeted by Labor Minister
Yigal Allon, who promised them
assistance for a transitory period
until they can integrate themselves
into the town's economy.
Members of the group, which
includes artisans, p r ofessionals
and Yeshiva students, said they
hoped to rebuild the Jewish sec-
tion of Hebron.
This town, which lies almost due
south of Jerusalem, was occupied
by Jordan during the 1948 war and
recaptured by Israel forces during
last June's Six-Day war. To re-
ligious Jews, it is one of the four
holy cities of Israel. Nearby is the
Cave of Machpela, the burialplace
of the Hebrew Patriarchs. Jews
have lived here for centuries. But
the Jewish community was at-
tacked by Arabs in 1925 and again
in 1929 when a rabbi and a number
of Yeshiva students were mas-
sacred The last Jews left in 1936
to avoid a similar massacre.

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Traditional Seder Follows
Israeli Troops to All Fronts

TEL AVIV (JTA) — Massive
preparations assured a traditional
seder feast for Israeli Army units
stationed on far-fhng fronts from
the Golan Heights of Syria to the
shores of the Suez Canal and the
Red Sea.
The task was a major one be-
cause Israeli troops had never
been so widely dispersed outside
of Israel's territory since Israel
was established 20 years ago. But
the quartermaster's corps, under
the direction of the chief chaplin.
had "Operation Passover" well in
band. Troops were assured of
adequate supplies of matzot, sac-
ramental wine, haroset and all of
the ritual appurtenances of a
seder in addition to an ample
meal wherever they were stationed.
Seder services were conducted by
chanlins and cantors assigned to
each unit.
For civilians, the holiday was
marked by a steep rise in the
prices of food and flowers. All
hametz (leavened foods) of the
state of Israel was sold to Arab
villagers for a symbolic price. in
accordance with Jewish tradition.
For thousands of Israelis, Pass-
over was a holiday on wheels. and
the army set up information
centers for those traveling south
and into occupied territories.
Tourists arrived in record num-
bers.
Thousands of Israelis from all
parts of the country joined the
traditional Passover pilgrimage
to Jerusalem despite an unsea-
sonable heat wave that sent the
thermometer soaring into the
90s. Special trains brought hun-
dreds of pilgrims to the capital
where they were greeted by the
chief rabbis of Israel's major
cities and towns.
The traditional procession to the
top of Mt. Zion was made, as in
past years, but with an important
difference. Instead of halting at
what was the beginning of no-
man's land up to last June, the
throngs proceded into the old city
and visited the West Wall where
special prayers were recited.
The first seder to be held in the
Sinai Desert since the Israelites
left Egypt 3,280 years ago was
attended by thousands of soldiers
and civilians Friday night. The
seder, at which Rabbi Shlomo
Goren, chief chaplain of Israel's
armed forces, officiated, featured
a choir of 200 soldiers. Special
guests were a group of 200 chil-
dren who recited the traditional
Four Questions in unison.
Arab Christians, outnumbered by
pilgrims fro m abroad, observed
Easter Sunday in Jerusalem and
Jaffa. The Israel government was
represented at church services in
the capital by S. Toledano, the
prime minister's adviser on Arab
affairs. Streets in East Jerusalem
and in Jaffa were festively dec-
orated by the respective munici-
palities.
The Israeli Army, meanwhile,
held a seder on Mt. Scopus attend-
ed by Brigadier Narkiss, com-
mander of the central front. A
special seder for wounded soldiers
was held at Hadassah Hospital.
Tourists had a second seder at
Hamlin House.

18 Friday, April 19, 1968

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS



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AJCongress to Open
50th Year With Dinner

NEW YORK — The American
Jewish Congress will inaugurate its
50th anniversary year at a golden
jubilee dinner Sunday evening at
the New York Hilton Hotel.
Max Doft, a close associate of
the founder and long-time leader
of AJCongress, Rabbi Stephen S.
Wise, will be guest of honor.
Judge Justine Wise Polier of the
New York Family Court, honorary
president of the organization's
national women's division, heads
the 50th anniversary committee of
the Congress.

Crews of the forestry and land-
scaping division of the Detroit
Department of Parks and Recrea-
tion last year repaired 5,778 dis-
tressed trees in Detroit,

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